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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1962 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S1IHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 3

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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(Continued from Page 4)
1550-1660, Tues., April 17, 1:30 to 4:30
pm.; English and American Literature,
1660-1790, Sat., April 21, iia.m to 12
;.;1790-1870, Tues., Apri 24, 1:30 to
4:30 p.m.; and 1870-1950, Sat., April 28,
9 a.m. to 12 m. The Tuesday examina-
tions will be given in Room 165, Busi-
ness Administration Bldg.; the Satur-
day examinations will be given in
Room 1408, Mason Hall.
School of Music Honors Program: Ap-
plications now are being received for
the first semester, 1962-63. Forms are
available in the School of Music Of-
fice, Lane Hall. Deadline for receipt of
applications and supporting statements
by "the Honors Council: Wed., April 18.
AUTOMOBILE REGULATIONS
-SPRING RECESS
The student automobile regulations
will be lifted at 5:00 P.M. Fri., April 6,
and will be resumed again at 8:00 A.M.
┬░on Mon., April 16. Office of the Dean
of Men.
The University of Michigan Marching
Band will participate in the Michigras
Parade on Fri., April 27. Uniform will
be black shoes, black socks, dark trous-
ers and Band Jacket. Music and instru-
ments will be checked out a Harris Hall
on Thurs., April 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. All
men are asked to register with Mr.
Cavender at Harris Hall by April 20, so
that a marching formation may be
established and a proper distribution
of parts for music be determined.
Open registration for the next series
of Reading Improvement classes will be
held on Thurs., April 5 at 1610 Wash-
tenaw (corner of Hill). The course is
non-tuition, non-academic. (Content:
speed reading, comprehension, study
techniques, test making techniques,
vocabulary, spelling.)
Events Tuesday
Seninar on the United Nations Un-
versity: tenth session. "Physical Plan-
ning and Development of the United
Nations University." Sponsored by Asso-
cation for Committment to World
Responsibility." Discussants: Theodore
Larsen, Prof. of Architecture; William
Johnson, Asso. Prof. of Architecture.
7:30 p.m., 3516 Student Activities Bldg.,
Tues., April 3.
Mathematics Colloquium: Dr. Paul
Cohn, Yale University, will speak on
"Quadratic extensions of skew fields"
on Tues., April 3, at 4 p.m. In Rm. 3209
Angell Hall. Refreshments at 3:30 p.m
in 3212 Angell Hall.
Challenge: Prof. Richard Meier, school
of natural resources, and Michael Oli-
nick, '63, Michigan Daily, will lead a
seminar on "The Future of The Uni-
versity of Michigan" at 7:30 p.m. Tues.,
April 3, in the Honors Lounge of the
Undergraduate Library.
Evenis Wednesday
? Degree Recital: Ruth Biggerstaff,
pianist, will present a recital on Wed.,
April 4, 8:30 p.m., Lane Hall Aud. in
partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the degree Master of Music. Miss
Biggerstaff will perform the composi-
tions of Beethoven, David Bates, Robert
Palmer, and Schumann. Open to the
public.
History Lecture: Prof. Harold J.
Grimm, Chairman of the Department
of History, Ohio State University, will
lecture on "The Reformation and So-
cial Revolution," Wed., April 4, 4:15
p.m. in And. C, Angell Hall.
Lecture: Dr. Joseph Melnick, Baylor
University, will speak on "Virus Sensi-
tivity of Mammalian Cells" on Wed.,
April 4 at 4:00 p.m. in the 5th level
amphitheatre, Medical Science Bldg.
Sociology Colloquium: "Some Psycho-
logical Studies of American High Fer-
tility" will be discussed by Don Bogue,
University of Chicago, on Wed., April
4 at 4:15 p.m. in And. A.
Seminar in Mathematics Statistics:
Prof. Henry Konijn, University of Syd-
ney and Yale University, will speak on
"Some Problems of Identification," at
4 p.m. on Wed., April 4 in 3201 Angell
Hall. Note the change from the usual
day of the week.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau'
of Appointments-Seniors & grads please
call Ext. 3544 for interview appoint-
ments with the following:
WED., APRIL 4-
Boy Scouts of America, Chicago, Ill.
--(a.m. only)-Men; degree any field
for positions as District Scout Execu-
tives. Feb., June & Aug. grads. Loca-
tions: Throughout U.S.
National Cash Register Co., Dayton, .
-Men in Bus. Ad. or Liberal Arts
(esp. Math) for Mgmt. Trng. in one of
the following areas of Electronic Data
Processig: (1) Computer Sales, (2) Pro-
grammer, (3) Systems Analyst, (4) Site
Rep.

Abraham & Straus, Brooklyn, N.Y.-
Men & Women; degree any field for po-
sitions as Executive Trainee, leading to
immediate positions in Buying, Opera-
tions, Sales, Mgmt., Res., Control, Fi-
nance, etc. Also summer work in Selling
Div. for college juniors. Interview in
store only for summer work.
THURS., APRIL 5-
Aeronautical Chart & Information
Center, St. Louis, Mo-Men & Women
interested in Catography as a career. 6
hrs. of math required with various com-
binations of other sciences includ.,
physics, geology, geog., engrg.
* * *
Please call General Div., Bureau of
Appts., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for further
information.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule at 128-H West
Engrg.
APRIL 5-6--
Bell Telephone Labs, Murray Hill, N.J.
-PhD: ChE & Met. R. & D.
APRIL 5-
Electric Autolite Co., All Div. - BS:
EE & ME. Both Men & Women. U.S.
citizens and foreign students who want
to return to their native land. Summer
Employment: Jrs. In above fields. Group
Meeting at 4:20 in Rm. 144, W.E. Please
sign special group meeting schedule.
Des., Dev. & Elec. Rotating Equipment.
Northern Ind. Public Service, Com-
pany wide-Northern one-third of Ind.
-BS: EE & ME. June & Aug. grads.
Des., & Prod.
APRIL 6-
Wakneer Co., Architectural Metals
Div., Niles, Mich.-BS: CE, ME & Met.
June & Aug. grads. Des., R. & D., Prod.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Time, Inc., Chicago, Ill. - Recent &
June grads for Subscription Service Div.
Men for mgmt. trng. prog. Positions in
fields of Methods Engrg., Computer
Prog., Acc't., Statistics, Data Process-
ing & Subscription Entry Operations.
WOMEN for supervisor Trng. Prog. &
Computer Programmer Trng. Prog.
Atlantic Refining Co., Philadelphia,
Pa.-Evaluation Engnr. for R. & D.
Dept. BS In Chem. Engrg.
Interstate Commerce Commission, Bu-
reau of Transport Econ. & Stat., Wash-
ington, D.C.-Position in Research Sect.
requiring combination of econ. or bus-
iness trng. together with indust. engrg.
bkgd. General nature of work involved
lies in area of econ. & quantitative
analysis of transportation operations
subject to Commission regulation.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time yobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made inthe Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Building, during the following hours:
Monday thru Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon
and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should call Bob Hodges at NO
3-1531, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MEN
1-With programming ability plus fast,
accurate keypunch skills.
2-Full-time, experienced keypunch
operators.
2-Couple-personable woman to han-
dle rentals, etc. Husband may have
NO PATIENT IS HOPELESS:
teMenninu
approach 10
From all over America, mental pa-
tients have pinned their iast hopes
on the Menninger Clinic. In fact, it is
often considered the psychiatric
capitai of the world. In this week's
Saturday Evening Post, you'll meet
the remarkable Menninger brothers.
Learn why they teel there is hope
even for psychotics. And read case
histories of some of their patients.
The Saturday Evening
APST
APRL 7 ISSUE NOW ON SALE

other job or be semi-retired for
simple maintenance work. Must be
handy. No children. Title of job:
Resident Manager.
FEMALE
1-With programming ability plus fast,
accurate keypunch skills.
2-Couple-personable womanyto han-
dle rentals, etc. Husband may have
other job or be semi-retired for
simple maintenance work. Must be
handy. No children. Title of Job:
Resident Manager.
Agenda Student Government Council
April 4, 1962, 7:15 p.m., Council Room
Constituents' Time 9:00 p.m.
Minutes of the previous meeting.
Officer reports: President, Letters;
Executive Vice-President, Interim Ac -
tion; Administrative Vice-President,
Treasurer, Announcements.
Standings Committees.
Ad Hoc Committees and Related
Boards: Report on Study of the Hare
System.
Special Business (8:30 p.m.): Hearing
on Recommendation from Committee
on Membership in Student Organiza-
tions on Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma
Nu.
Old Business.
New Business.
Constituents' and Members' Time.
Announcements.
Adjournment.

To Present
Film Viewing
Negro Life
The Human Relations Board will
show the film "Walk in My Shoes"
at 7:00, 8:15 and 9:30 tonight at
Alice Lloyd Hall.
The film is the story of the life
of Negroes in the United States
and depicts the conditions under
which Negroes are forced to live in
this country.
The Bell and Howell Company
presented the film on television
last fall.
Wednesday night the movie will
be shown at 7:30 p.m. in the West
Quadrangle dining room.
There will be another showing
of "Walk in My Shoes" 7:30 p.m.
Thursday in the Multipurpose
Room of the UGLI.
Previous to this the movie was
shown on campus Sunday after-
noon, also in the Multi-purpose
room of the UGLI.

SOLAR FURNACE-Judges evaluate a heating unit built by James Graves of
Frost Junior High School, Jackson, which operates by reflecting the sun's rays

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A three-inch bubble chamber and a chemistry exhibit entitled "Organic
Isomerism" received top awards at the Fourth Annual Southeastern Michigan
Science Fair, which was held Friday through Sunday at the Intramural Building.
Leonard S. Joeris, Jr., a junior at Ann Arbor High School, who built the
bubble chamber, and Mary Helen Sherburne, a junior at St. Thomas High
School, who designed the chemistry display, will receive expense-paid trips to
the National Science Fair in Seattle, May 2-5, $25 in cash and Argus Cameras.
A total of 106 students from junior high schools and 63 senior high school
students entered their exhibits in the Fair, a non-profit event sponsored by the
Ann Arbor Exchange Club, the Ann Arbor News, and the University.
Judges Examine Exhibits
Sixty-five judges evaluated the displays and awarded prizes in six senior
high school divisions and a general science category at the junior level.
In the senior division, projects were arranged in biology, chemistry, earth
sciences, engineering, physics and mathematics categories.
An awards luncheon was held for the participants at which Dr. Winston E.
Kock, director of research for Bendix Corp, addressed the students.
Junior Award Winners
First-place boy winner in the junior division was Douglas Harrington of
Forsythe Junior High School, who entered a display on "How Density of Old
and New Snow is Affected by Wind Speed and Temperature."
Frances Hooper of Tappan Junior High School was the top girl winner in
the junior division with her exhibit on "Where Animals Can Live in Mid-Winter."
Both received science books and $25 in cash.

CIRCULATORY SYSTEM-Katie Heywood of
Tappan Jr. High School built this model show-
ing the veins and arteries of a man as they
flow to and from the heart.

TODAY'
Challenge Seminar
Prof. Richard Meier
Michael Olinick
The Future of The
'University of Michigan
7:30
Honors Lounge, UGLI

COME TO THE FAIR-A total of 169 junior and senior high school students from 19 schools in five Michigan counties prepared
projects for the Fourth Annual Southeastern Michigan Science Fair which was held Friday through Sunday in the IntramuralaBuilding.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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V...

STORY-Judith Bleier
PHOTOS-Edward Lang$ TESLA COIL-Dan Wilder, right, of Forsythe Junior High School is aided by a
gs friend in demonstrating his Tesla Coil, a replica of the high frequency tuned
transformer developed originally by Nikola Tesla.

> UMU IV M * DRY CLEANING
jOMERW*LAUNDRY-FLUF-DRY and FOLD

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