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March 31, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY s

Seniors Take Big Step

Con-Con Delegates Speak
On Educational Problems

U

Don't Miss:*

-Daily-Peter Gottschalk
SENIOR NIGHT-Senior women begin their march from the
Iagto the League for Senior Night activities Wednesday. After
dinner the seniors saw a preview of Junior Girls Play. Following
tradition, married women blew out candles, engaged women
sucked lemons, those going steady received corks to keep plugging
and unattached seniors pitched pennies.
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
OSIJ Council Acts T o Strip
Acacia Chapter of Recognition

By BARBARA LAZARUS
A major problem facing the con-
stitutional convention's Committee
on Education was which of the1
many educational concerns would
achieve constitutional status andE
which would have legislative con-a
trol, Alvin Bentley (R-Owosso),
chairman of the committee, said
recently.
Speaking before the 14th An-
nual Conference for School Board
Members and School Officials
Tuesday, Bentley explained the
p r o b 1 e m s and responsibilities
which surrounded the writing of
the educational article.
Outlines Procedures
Steven Nisbet (R-Fremont),
Con-Con chairman, outlined the
procedures in committee selection,
and Leslie W. Richard (R-Negau-
nee), Con-Con representative, de-
scribed the new recommended se-
lection of state superintendent of
education.
Bentley said that long-range
educational developments went in-
to the constitution while short-
range problems such as school aid
formulas, annexation, and school
districts went to the Legislature.
These changing policies could be
better altered by legislative action
when they are needed. '
The committee also found that
all financial questions, including'
those educational in nature, were
under the Jurisdiction of the Fi-
nance and Taxation Committee,
Bentley said.
Aware of Rulings
A close relationship between
the two committees kept the edu-
cation committee aware of rulings
such as earmarking of state sales
tax, the rate of assessments and
the alloting of funds.
it

Richards told how the commit-
tee decided to expand the State
Board of Education from four
to eight members and to place
the position of state superintend-
ent of education on an appoint-
ment plan.
Russian Student
To Deliver Talk
Serge Lebedev, a Russian ex-
change student, will give a talk
at 2 p.m. today in Dining Rm. 2
of South Quad.

i'

SHE'S NOT EXACTLY' A GEISHO-HE'S NOT EXACTLY YANKEE-

But They Make Hilarious
Time For You! A

Most Honorable Student:
Here is our extreme pleasure
to offer story of laughter . . .
Not Kabuki - Not Kooky - , X
Just witty, modern fun.
DIAL NO 5-6290

PNADECUT
RO,
IHNEBSRIN
BOERER
* Gilbert & Sullivan's
PATIENCE or BUNTHORNt'S BRIDE
April 3-6

Ai

By H. NEIL BERKSON
COLUMBUS -The Council on
Student Affairs at Ohio State
University has voted to withdraw
recognition from Acacia fraternity
as a student organization.
"The reason for the withdrawal
of recognition was the refusal of
the representatives of the Acacia
Alumni Association to comply with
the requirements of a university
audit or to apply- for an exemp-
tion from the audit which could
have been granted if certain con-
ditions were met," OSU Dean of
Men Mylin H. Ross said.
OSU regulations require that
a student organization have its
books audited once a year. Acacia's
books had not been audited since
December, 1960.
In February of last year Acacia
declared that it no longer had any
assets and that it was turning its
finances over to its alumni asso-
ciation. Subsequent attempts by
the dean of men's office to woriK
with Acacia met with a lack of
cooperation on the part of the
alumni group.
John T. Bonner Jr., executive
dean of student relations, com-
mented that the withdrawal of
recognition will mean, among
other things, "the organization will
not be permitted to use any uni-
versity facilities; the organization
must withdraw, from the Council
of Fraternity Presidents; the
League To Show
Bridal Fashions;
"Wediquette," an annual show-
ing of bridal fashions, will be pre-
sented at 2 p.m. today in the
League Ballroom. This year the
program will show campus and
summer wear in addition to wed-
ding fashions.
Refreshments are also on the
agenda.

name of the organization will not
appear in any university publica-
tions and the organization will not
be permitted to claim any con-
nection with OSU."
* * *
SEATTLE--Two University of
Washington professors have agreed
to sign the state's loyalty oath
now that the-United States Su-
preme Court has dismissed their
appeal of the constitutionality of
the loyalty oath law.
Prof. Howard L. Nostrand, direc-
tor of romance languages, and
Max Savelle, associate professor
of history, backed by the American
Civil Liberties Union, first brought
their case before the State Su-
preme Court in 1955.
The court ruled that the part
of the law defining subversive
groups was unconstitutional, but
declared the rest of the law valid.
Attorney Francis Hoague, who
prepared the professors' appeal,
said that "presumably, the univer-
sity (Washington) will now in-
augurate a program of oaths."
Set .Deadline
For Contest
Students wishing to enter the
Bain-Swiggett poetry competition
must submit their entries by Mon-
day to the Hopwood Rm., 1006 An-
gell Hall,
The prize was donated by Glen
Levin Swiggett of Washington,
D.C. The award of $40 is given
each year for the best poem in
traditional form written by a Uni-
versity student, graduate, or un-
dergraduate.
Poems may be of any length,
although no more than three
poems may be entered in the com-
petition by one contestant in any
given year.

CO ME/

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/ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

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SAB BATHI,

SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning Prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
Rev. Eugene Ransom.
TUESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 P.M. Daily Evening Prayer.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses at 8:00,19:30, 11:00, 12:00
and 12:30
Daily Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and 12:00
During Lent on Friday there will be a Mass at
5:10 p.m.
LENTEN DEVOTIONS
Wednesday, 7:30
Friday, The Stations of the Cross and Benedic-
tion at 7:15
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow
NO 2-3580
Services:
9:00 and 10:30 James 1. McCord, President'
Princeton Theological Seminary.
11:50 Jack Borckardt
CAMPUS CENTER
10:30 A.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Acts,"
Campus Center.
6:30 P.M. Quest and Question at Campus
Center.
MONDAY
9:00 P.M. Coffee and Concern, 217 S. Ob-
servatory.
WEDNESDAY
4:15 P.M. Noise of Solemn Assemblies. Protes-
tant Foundation, 536 Thompson.-
THURSDAY
12:10 P.M. Chapel Service. Douglas Chapel.
608 E. William.
4:15 P.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Ro-
mans." 217 S. Observatory.
FRIDAY
6:15 Grad group dinner and program

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
April 1, 1962
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. MorningWorhip.
Series: What Jesus Taught, "About Pray-
er." Sermon by Dr. Rupert. Broadcast at
11:15 on station WOIA.
6:45 Meet in Wesley Lounge to go to the St.
Andrews Episcopal Church.
TUESDAY
8:00-11:00 Open (House, Jean Robe's apart-
ment'.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room.
5:15 p.m. Holy Communion, Chapel.
THURSDAY
7:15 p.m. Marriage Class, Green Room.
FRIDAY
5:30 p.m. Wesley Grads, Supper, Pine Room

;
1

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder. Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8.7622
SUNDAY
9:30 A.M. Worship Service and Communion
9:45 A.M. Bible Study
11:00 A.M. Worship Service
7:00 P.M. "The Passion According to St.
John" by J. S. Bach Presented by the
Chapel Choir and Orchestra. '
WEDNESDAY
7:15 P.M. Lenten Vespers
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with Holy
Communion, sermon by the pastor, "Pray-
er That Is Acceptable."
Sunday at 9:45 and 10:15: Bible classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program, "Religion in
Contemporary Literature," Mr. Charles
Minneman, Director of Religious Affairs at
EMU, Speaker.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Lenten Vespers, the
Rev. Vernold Aurich, Guest Preacher.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sermon Topic:
"My Name is Simon"
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40. Dr. Preston
Slosson.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Monday
thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. except
Sundays and Holidays. Monday evening
7:00 to 9:00.

i

--

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill St.
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Anthony and June Bing, House Directors
NO 2-9890
SUNDAY MORNING
10:00 A.M. Sunday School, Adult Discussion,
Worship Fellowship.
11:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship
TUESDAY, APRIL 2
5:45 P.M. Student Discussion-Supper; Peace
Corps Training for Thailand.

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Y
r

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister

t

SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class, Baptist Campus
Center
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
6:45 p.m. A.B.S.F.

962,
ives"
Roy

I

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave,
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow ot Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, April 1,
will be: "Changing Religious Perspec
The sermon will be delivered by Dr
Wood Sellars.
Adult Discussion Group of 10:00

ti

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