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March 29, 1962 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY-

Range of Gowns Awaits Bride

ruffles and other fine details.
Jackets, boleros, aprons and petti-
coats of imported lace highlight
these fabrics.
A beautiful wedding gown need
not be something which can never
be worn again. Gowns with remov-
able trains or jackets can be worn
as cocktail or party dresses after
the big occasion. Some gowns are
even made so that the lower tier
can be cut off, leaving a street
length cocktail dress.
The train helps complete the
plan and lines of the gown. A very
simple gown may have a beautiful
flowing train of lace. A dress with
a sculptured skirt may have a
train which compliments and
completes the curves of the skirt.
Flounced, Scalloped
Other trains are flounced or
scalloped. Still others fall in regal
draped pleats. An apron-like train
may be worn over a slim sheath
skirt.

White patent leather pumps are
becoming somewhat of a wedding
classic. However, the traditionally
elegant white satin pump is still
very popular.
The veil is traditionally made of
fine organza attached to a jeweled
tiara or a satin pillbox. However,
the bride may choose to wear a
Spanish mantilla or perhaps a
dainty kerchief which matches an
equally dainty dress.
Although the street length dress
for bridesmaids is very popular
this spring, no one can deny that
the floor length dress is both beau-
tiful. and dramatic. There are nu-
merous styles and materials from
which to choose so that the brides-
maid's dress may carry out the
plan suggested by the bride's
gown.
These styles and others will be
displayed to prospective brides and
other interested women in Wedi-
quette to be held 2 p.m. Saturday
in the League Ballroom.

Bulkies Keep
V-Neckline,
Add Collar
The bulky sweater look for
spring will not abandon the v-
shaped necklines, but they will be
more in evidence than ever, prob-
ably enhanced by a little collar
or a scarf.
The bulkiness of the sweaters is
growing softer, lighter and fluffier.
Mohair, the fluffiest of yarns and
loose knitting on huge needles ac-
count for this look.
Mohair, in fact, is becoming
nearly synonymous with bulky
'knit. It is available to the knitter
as well as those looking for ready-
to-wear sweaters in a multitude of
colors. The mohair yarns are usu-
ally more expensive than the
regular worsteds, however.
Even the classic sweater set is
making an emphatic appearance
this spring. There is a new look
to the pullover, however; it is
without sleeves. This little pull-
over can be stretched through
many seasons, from warm to cool.
Adding 'more color to the sea-
son's fashion scene are sweaters
with prints ranging from floral
designs to colorful paisley. These
sweaters are, knit of light, syn-
thetic fabrics, washable and ideal
for coordination in bright spring
outfits.
Sweaters are longer too, drop-
ping anywhere from the hips to
the knees.
The Idea

RUSH FOR GOLD!

-Daily--Jerome Starr
NEW DESIGN-New colors and styles mark the 1962 fashion in
skirts which will be lower waisted and brightly hued.' Pleated
skirts are expected to be quite popular this year.
Skirt DesignsFeature
New ~Style, Clr

The Big Hit
in
Florida
1299

By KATHRYN VOGT
Introducing an exciting array of
bright colors and new styles,

The idea. Be as soft, curvy and spring skirt fashions promise to
as alluring as possible to the op- set new trends in 1962.
posite sex. As Oscar Wilde once Newest on the fashion scene are
pointed out, styles change but the the hip-hugging skirts, designed
designs of women remain the same. after Western levis. Hip-huggers

CONVERSATION-MAKING FASHION
Shimmering gold to light your way along the spring fashion route, to show-off under the noonday
stint Standing tail on alim-stack heels, pointing an elegant pecd toe, As seen in Vogue.
9:00 to 5:30 -open Monday Nite - On State Street

are so-named because they are'
worn low, paired with extra-long
blouses. They will be fashioned in
a variety of styles - p1eated,
straight, and A-line. Some will
sport "suspenders" as added dec-
oration.
Wrap-around skirts , will win
new popularity this year, both in
the knee-tickler and regular
lengths. A new wrap-around fea-
ture is the addition of pleats,
which will make the skirt adjust-
able to any size.
Stitched-down Pleats
Skirts with stitched-down pleats
will again make the fashion scene,
in bright tarpon plaids. The
straight and modified A-line skirts
will also be very much in style.
Knee-tickler kilties and regular
length kilts, fashioned in wool,
madras, and tarpon cloth, will be
worn this year.
For the active miss, specially-
designed skirts will be available.
Bowling skirts -,short and color-
ful are in" this year. ashare
culottes' - skirts that are half-
skirt and half-pants..
Skirt Lengths
Skirt lengths haven't chanced
drastically since last year. If any-
thing, they are shorter, but the
trend seems to be to keep hem-
lines just below the knee. Knee-.
ticklers are gaining popularity,
particularly in casual, playtime
skirts.
Skirts for spring will show off
their attractive lines in a gay
rainbow of color. Citrus orange,
lemon and' lime will highlight
many outfits. An Americana theme
-red, white and blue - will be
featured in skirts, blouses, and
suits.
Many fabric-color combinations
will be seen-denim blue, madras,
tarpon plaids, and patterns of
calico.
Fabrics will' range from casual
denims to delicate silks. Honsack-
ing, madras, cotton cord, and
easy-to-care-for dacron and cot-
ton combinations are other mater-
ials from which this spring's
bright and attractive skirts will be
styled.

Kennedy Sets
High Fashion
Jackie Contrasts
With Quiet Mamie
By BARBARA LAZARUS
The Kennedy Administration
brought America a new frontier
policy which has influenced the
area of high fashions as well as
politics.
Herspreference for French de-
signs, flashing colors, and simple,
but elegant styles, greatly eon-
trasts with the subdued tastes of
Mamie Eisenhower.
Mamie preferred matronly, rath-
er undistinguished clothes. Since
her fashions did not rank with
the avante garde class, she was
dubbed the "next door neighbor"
type. Fashion designers virtually
ignored her as an extremely po-
tent force in the fashion market.
"Good Old American"
Mamie did command an affec-
tionate following among the aver-
age, middle class housewife. Her
"good old American" tastes, and
her refusal continuously to buy
expensive new clothing further en-
deared her to the public.
Mamie liked full skirts,' Peter
Pan collars, and large dangle
bracelets. Her hair with its out-;
moded bangs started a national
revolution which set back hair
styles some twenty years.
When Mamie wore her pink,
rhinestone-studded inauguration
gown, the American public's fa-
vorite color was pink. The grand-
mother image of the first lady was
perpetuated fully in her tastes.
IShe lacked any desire to be a-
ing,, youthful, or sophisticated.
"Jackie Look"
Jackie Kennedy represents one
of the latest high fashion first la-
dies in many years. The "Jackie
Look" with its under-stated ele-
gance ,unfitted silhouette, and
great simplicity swept across young
and old America.
Fashion experts'looked upon her
as the great potential booster of
clothing ever to influence Ameri-
can women.
Her campaign trail was even
scarred with many fashion battles.
Pat Nixon falsely accused her of
spending over $30,000 a year on a
mixture of French and domestic
designs. The newspapers called her
"too chic" and criticized her con-
troversial bouffant hair style.
Brings New Awareness
Jackie has brought the United
States a new awareness for cloth-
ing. Her preference for French or-
iginals and good United States
copies of French designs, and her
interest in the designs of Norman
Norell bring many exciting new'
fashions to light.
Her favorite style of a sleeveless,
collarless, and beltless ;sheath
comes in a wide variety of colors
and fabrics. Her youth, good taste,
and natural flair for the right
clothes at the right time, has made
many American women more
aware than ever of the need for
original fashion ideas. Pillbox hats,
"slash bangs," and casual wool
suiits or dresses capture her good
looks and good taste.
Jackie's clothes are daring and
colorful, and she spends both time
and money having a well-balanced
wardrobe. She wears clothes like a
fashion model and is not afraid to
try the exotic or extreme. This ex-
citing quality has caused many av-
erage "plain Janes" to deny that
she is any sort of representative
image of America.
Though some of her fashions
have toned down slightly after her
first year in the White House, she
still remains one of the best
dressed and most exciting women
in American fashions.

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Carefully and charmingly casual ...
Our carefullyflared button-down shirt
with vibrant India Madras Bermuda
Shorts. n
j" This is just one of the numerous out--
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