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March 28, 1962 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESD.

' Tankers Seek NCAA

j

e PRO PLAY-OFF ROUNDUP:
Montreal Advances

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This Is the first'
two articles analyzing Michi-
an's chances in hthe NCAA swim-
ing championships which begin
hirsday afternoon in Columbus.
oday's article deals with the free-
yle events and diving, tomorrow's
Be specialty events.)
By BILL BULLARD

T

Even without Indiana, Big Ten
swimmers will dominate the NCAA
meet which runs Thursday through
Saturday in Columbus.
Michigan Has Chance
The Big Ten champion Hoosiers
are notcallowed to compete in the
NCAA championships because of
football recruiting violations. But
either Michigan or Ohio State,
second and third place finishers
in the Big Ten, should uphold the
reputation of the conference by
winning the team championship.
The fourth place Big Ten team,
Michigan State, also has a chance
for first place in the-NCAA meet,
and Minnesota, fifth in the Big
Ten, should at least finish in the
top ten.
Southern California, 1960 cham-
pion and runner-up to Michigan!
in 1961, is powerful enough again'
to topple a Big Ten team and win
the championship for itself.
Since 1937 when team cham-
pionships, were first officially
awarded at the. NCAA meet, the
only non-Big Ten teams to come
in first place have been Yale (four
times) and Southern California.
All the other championships have
been captured by Michigan and
Ohio State. Each team has won
ten times.
Freestyle Will Be Tough
The 50- and 100-yd. freestyle
races are expected to be among
the most competitive of all the
events. Ray Padovan of Southern
Illinois, the NCAA recordholder in
the 100 at :47.8, will be facing two
swimmers who have already turn-
ed in faster times than his record.
Yale sophomore Mike Austin has
been timed at/:47.0 and Minne-
sota's Steve Jackman did :47.4 in
winning the Big Ten 100-yard
championship.
Four others-Robert Kaufmann
of Harvard, Mike Wood and Jeff
Mattson of Michigan State, and
John Plain of Ohio State-have
done :49.0 or better. Michigan's
only hope of reaching the finals in
this event lies with, Jim Kerr who
swam a time of :49.1 twice at the
Big Ten meet.
Jackman and former Michigan
sprinter Frank Legacki hold the
NCAA 50-yard freestyle record of
:21.4. However, Jackman swam a
:21.1 in the preliminaries of the
Big Ten meet and Austin's best
time is :21.2. Edwin Spencer of
North Carolina State (:21.7), Rob-
ert Kaufmann of Harvard (:21.9)
and Kerr (:21.9) are also threats
in the 50.
Murray Rose of Southern Cali-

fornia holds the NCAA records in
the 220-, 440-, and 1500-yard free-
style events. The record times of
the 1960 Olympic 400-meter free-
style champion from Australia
would be fast enough to take the
individual titles again this season
if he could duplicate his last sea-
son's performances.
Rose's record time of 2:00.6 in
the 220 stands the best chance of
being bettered. Big Ten champion
Mike Wood of Michgan State
(2:01.3), Jim Spreitzer of Illinois
(2:01.9), and captain Bill Darnton
(2:02.2) are closest to the mark.
'M' USC Vie
Michigan and Southern Califor-
nia have most of the candidates
for the finals of the 440-yard free-
style. Rose's record is 4:17.9 and
his teammates Dennis Rounsavelle
(4:27.7), and John House (4:28.1),
and Brian Foss (4:30.0) could

break into the finals. Darnton
(4:25.7), Roy Burry (4:26.0), John
Dumont (4:32.4), and Warren Uh-
ler (4:33.7) are powerful Wolverine
hopefuls.
Aubrey Burer of Southern Meth-
odist seems a good bet to reach
the finals as he has been clocked
at 4:22.7.
Some other possible finalists are
Richard Blick of North Central
(4:31.4), Dick Brackett of Mich-
igan State (4:32.7), Orrin Nord-
strom of Ohio State (4:32.8), and
Lynwood Straw of Yale (4:33.0).
Rose Favorite
Rose's record of 17:21.8 in the
1500-yard freestyle seems safe
from anyone but ' possibly Rose
himself. Southern Cal has other
potential finalists in Foss (17:42.0)
and Rounsavelle (17:43.9). Michi-
gan can count on Burry (17:43.5)
and Uhler (18:03.5) to make a
strong bid for the finals. Southern

Methodists Burer has done a
17:55.8 to rate a favorite's role for By The Associated Press
the finals. MONTERAL - Frustrated for
Michigan State's freestyle relay: two periods by the acrobatics of
team broke the listed NCAA record goalie Glenn Hall, the Montreal

by winning the Big Ten event in
3:14.5. Minnesota (3:17.7) and
Michigan (3:18.0) finished second
and third and should place high
in the NCAA finals.
Conference Divers Tops
Dick Kimball, diving coach, said
"Most of the diving competition
will be from the Big Ten." Two
divers who won their conference
championships arnd who might
break the Big Ten monopoly on
the diving are John Deinnger of
Washington and Andrews of
Princeton, Kimball said. Purdue's
John Vogel, Ohio State's Juan Bo-
tella and Lou Vitucci, and Michi-
gan's Ron Jaco and Pete Cox are
the best from the Big Ten.

DEFENDING BIG TEN CHAMPS:

Netmen Prepare for Season

I it -4.t -.4. ,&'

Canidiens broke open for two goals
-by Dickie Moore and Jean Beli-
veau-last night to defeat the Chi-
cago Black Hawks, 2-1 and take a
1-0 lead in their best-of-7 semi-
final Stanley Clup playoff series.
The Hawks, who dethroned the
Canadiens last year after Montreal
had won the cup five years in a
row, were held completely in check
until Stan Mikata drilled the puck
past Jacques Plante at 18:06 of
the final period.
Ex-Michigan star Red Berenson
played in the game for the Cana-
diens, but did not score or make
an assist.
* * *
TORONTO-The Toronto Maple
Leafs whipped the New York
Rangers, 4-2 last night in the
opener of their best-of-seven game
semifinal series for the Stanley
Cup.
Two goals while New York had
an extra player and the superb
goal-tending of Johnny Bower
made the difference for the Leafs,
who finished second in the reg-
ular National Hockey League sea-
son, 21 points ahead of fourth
place New York.
Dave Keon, Red Kelly, Tim Hor-
ton, and George Armstrong scored
for the Leafs, who had won seven
straight games without a loss
against the Rangers at Toronto.
Horton's goal, at 14:42 of the sec-
ond period, was the eventual win-
ner-boosting Toronto's lead to 3-
1.
* * *
DETROIT-Jerry West rescued
the Los Angeles Lakers in the fin-
al quarter last night as they de-
feated the Detroit Pistons 111-106
and took a 3-0 command in their
best of 7 National Basketball As-
sociation Western Division finals.

The Lakers led from the opening
quarter, but five times in the final
period the Pistons crawled within
four points. Detroit's last chance
came with 3:30 to go when it pull-
ed 104-100 behind.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA-The Philadel-
phia Warriors; getting outside
shooting from rookie substitute
York Larese and a strong perform-
ance by Wilt Chamberlain, rallied
in the fourth quarter to defeat
Boston, 113-106, .last night and
even their National Basketball As-
sociation Eastern Division final
playoff series at one game each.
The best-of-seven series now
moves to the Boston Garden to-
night.
Boston last a good opportunity
to close the gap when Sam Jones
missed two straight fouls and Bob
Cousy later missed two in a row
with less than threeminutes re-
maining.
Chamberlain, who was held to
33 points in Boston's opening vic-
tory over the Warriors last Satur-
day, scored 42 points last night,
16 of them coming in the fourth
quarter. Larese, who played for
Warriors' Coach Frank McGuire
at North Carolina, was sent in in
the fourth quarter to boost the
Warriors' outside shooting. He
came through with eight key
points.

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By JAN W114KELMAN C
Michigan's defending Big Ten
tennis champions are preparing
for the 1962 tennis season with
what appears to be another cham-
pionship-caliber squad.,
Coach Bill Murphy is missing
four men from the team which
rolled over second place Michigan
State in last year's conference
meet 72-55. Wayne Peacock, Bruce
MacDonald, and Bill Vogt have
graduated. Senior Scott Maentz
disqualified himself from inter-
collegiate tennis competition by
signing a professional football
contract.
Lose Three Titlists
Peacock, Vogt, and Maentz each
won an individual title at the
conference championships at East'
Lansing last year. Peacock was
number three singles champion;
Vogt was number five singles
champ; and Maentz outlasted Bob
Ewald of Indiana for the sixth
singles spot. MacDonald teamed
with Vogt for the number three'
doubles title.
Dubie Back
This year's team should not be
considerably hampered by the loss
of four conference champions

!
v

Exhibition Baseball
Detroit 6, Washington 4
New York (A) 3, New York (N) 2
Chicago (A) 3, Milwaukee 1
Baltimore 5, Kansas City 2
Los Angeles (A) 4, Boston 1
Cincinnati 6, Minnesota 3
Los Angeles (N) 6, Philadelphia 4
Chicago (N) 12, Cleveland 3
Houston 11, San Francisco 4
St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 7

_

THIS WEEK SPECIAL
PIZZA
Made by Pizza Specialist

mainly because of the acquisition
of two outstanding performers:
Gerry Dubie and Henry Fauquier.
Dubie competed for the Wolverines
as a sophomore and junior, but
was ineligible last season. Fau-
quier is a sophomore who has
moved up from last year's fresh-
man squad.
Dubie was captain-elect before
being disqualified from last year's
team. He was not able to compete
at all in 1961 for Michigan.
In 1959 Dubie was second singles
champion in the Big Ten as a
sophomore. Two years ago he
teamed with John Wiley to cap-
ture the first doubles title. He was
eliminated from the first singles
title that year by the eventual
winner, Denny Konicki of North-
western.
Fauquier To Play Singles
Murphy estimates that Fauquier
will be playing singles for Michi-
gan this season, but is not sure
as to which position he will occu-
py. Fauquier hails from Toronto,
Ontario, where he was junior boys
champion.
Besides Dubie and Fauquier,
Coach Murphy will have back last
year's number one singles cham-
pion Ray Senkowski, who will vie
with Dubie for the, as yet unde-
cided, number one spot on this
year's team. Last year Senkowski
also teamed up with Peacock to
take the number one doubles.
Tenney, Beach Return
Murphy will also have the serv-
ices of letter-winners Jim Tenney
and Tom Beach. Tenney was run-
ner-up at the number four singles
spot two years ago and was elim-
inated in the semi-finals last year
by Dick Hall of Michigan State
in second place singles.
Beach is a senior from Kalama-
zoo having many Big Ten victor-
ies under his belt. He played at
sixth singles last year until Maentz
eventually took over.
Seniors Paul Kissner and Alex
McCleary, juniors Dave Ackley and
Ron Kilgren, and sophomore Ron
Linclau are others most capable
of breaking into the starting
ranks, according to Murphy.
Mike Is Ineligible
Ken Mike, who played for the
Wolverines two years ago, is again
back at Michigan after a one year
stay at the University of Detroit;
however, he is not eligible to play
this year for Michigan .
The Wolverines are currently
gold bond
cleaners
515 E. William
Odorless
Cleaning
correctly
finished
Free minor
repoirs
Free Moth-
proofing

working indoors at the I-M build-
ing awaiting more seasonable
weather before moving outside.
They open the regular season
Wednesday, April 25, with a home
meet here against Ohio Wesleyan.
Six men will be travelling to
Florida during spring vacation
where the tennis team tradition-
ally hold spring workouts.
Coach Clare Reissen's North-
western Wildcats offer the greatest
challenge to the Wolverines' rec-
ord of six conference champion-
ships in seven years. Reissen re-
portedly has three sophomores of
outstanding ability, among them
Reissen's son Marty who teamed
with Senkowski four years ago on
the U.S. junior Davis Cup team.

New"Sailing Club Season
Begins at Mass'Meeting

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SPOKEN-MOOD MUSIC

By CAROLINE DOW
The Sailing Club, after a win-
ter of hibernation in ice-boat cock-
pits, starts its spring season at
7:45 p.m. today at its Mass Meet-
ing in the Union Ballroom.
"Sailors, prospective sailors and
lovely girls are welcome," Club
commodore Norman Rabe, '63E,
said. The meeting will introduce
prospective members to the club
facilities by a slide show and dis-
cussion with members.
The Sailing Club, formed in 1932
by a group of naval architects, with
three sailing dinghys, now has a
permanent dock, boathouse and
"head" on Base Line Lake and a
fleet of nine Jet 14's and one MIT
Dinghy.,
Car Pool
Transportation to and from the
lake is handled on a car pool basis
with members owning cars receiv-
ing remuneration from the club
treasury.
PARET FIGHT:
Goldstein
Exonerated
ALBANY, N.Y. (P)-The state
athletic commission upheld the
referee's judgment and the medi-
cal precautions yesterday in the
near fatal Paret-Griffith welter-
weight championship fight Satur-
day night in New York City.
The three - man commission,
which had been asked by Gov.
Rockefeller to report on the tragic
fight, told the governor:
"It is our opinion that all possi-
ble medical precaution had been
taken prior to the contest and
referee (Ruby) Goldstein acted in
good judgment in stopping the
fight when he did."
Rockefeller released the report
to the public with the sole com-
ment-"I and my staff are giving
full consideration to the report."
Benny (Kid) Paret, who was the
welterweight champion, was bat-
tered senseless at Madison Square
Garden by Emile Griffith. Paret
still is in a coma and doctors say
that even if he survives chances
are slim that he ever will regain
full control of his body because of
the brain damage he suffered.
The commissioners -Melvin L.
Krulewitch, James A. Farley, and
Raymond J. Lee-said that Paret
was in "excellent physical condi-
tion" for the contest and that the
reputation, integrity and ability of
referee.Goldstein "is above re-
proach."

Membership, now up to 150
members, is open to anyone in the
Ann Arbor area. Sailing lessons
are available on Saturday morn-
Gomnberg ins
Gomberg won last night's I-M
residence hall indoor track
championship last night over
Wenley, 26-3/5 to 20-3/5.
Strauss, Reeves, and Hayden
were third, fourth, and fifth.
Peter Selleck of Wenley set
a new record of :08.7 in the 60-
yard high hurdles, bettering
the old mark of :09.1.
Another record was estab-
lished by Dave Monroe in the
pole vault. His vault was 11'4".
ings free of charge. Prospective
members will be invited to the
Club to try the boats and meet
members on the first ice-free
weekend. This time will be an-
nounced by the Commodore at the
meeting.
The club offers opportunities to
pleasure sail, as well as race. Pleas-
ure sailors go' out in a boat to
hear the wind in the rigging, to
skim across the water, heel, come-
about and generally match their
skill with the unpredictable wind
and water of inland Base Line
Lake.
Racing Too
For racing sailors, those who test
their skill and rulebooks against
fellow sailors, there are Sunday
morning interclub races and in-
tercollegiate racing every weekend.
Intercollegiate racers go as a team
from Michigan to race at different
schools.
The intercollegiate racing season
opens with an invitational regatta
at Ohio State the second week in
April. The following weekend
Michigan holds its invitational,
the Carey-Price Memorial Regat-
ta, in which ten schools, from the
East and midwest, compete.
"For every kind of sailor, there
is a place in the Sailing Club,"
member H. J. Menard, '64, said.
"Operation
Correction"
Admission FREE
Tonight -8 P.M.
Multi-purpose Room UGLI
___________- - - ------- - ~- ~ -

SRUSSIA AND I JLAT
EASTERN EUROPE
56 days $1309.40
Trip includes Holland, Germany,
Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia,
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
Austria, Yugoslavia, Italy, France,
Switzerland, England."
56 days in Europe. Leave June 27
on Dutch Gov't. Student Sailing. Re-inthe
turn Sept. 10 by ship or Aug. 31 by
air.
Small group. Space limited. $1309.40
all-expense, Write for FREE details.
Other Europe trips from $980 for stu-
dents only. From $1,035 for all ages.
Conlin Travel Bureau, Int.
1329 South University Ave.
Ann Arbor NO5-9151
SPRING IS SPRUNG
THE GRASS IS RIS
YOUR CARES ARE FLUNG
--NOW WHY DON'T YOU
GET YOUR BIKES FIXED ???
- -
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to us before the Spring rush
BEAVER'S BIKE & HARDWARE
605 CHURCH ST. NO 5-6607
STUDENT OWNED AND OPERATED

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A RFLIGHT to EUROPE

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