100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 27, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M. NTAL PATIENT FACILITIES:
Sociologist Discusses Halfway House

Professors
Cite Merits

By ROBERT SELWA
University of Pittsburgh sociol-,
ogist prof. David Landy outlined
the five main ' problems facing
halfway houses and other transi-
tional facilities for mental patients
in a social work colloquium yes-
terday.
The first problem is the right
length of stay for a patient, Prof.
Landy said.
The second problem is the cru-
cial one of the numerous patients
who, aft r returning to society,
YAF's To Decide
On Disarmament
Young Americans for Freedom
willmake a policy statement on
disarmament at a meeting at 7:30
p.m. tonight in the Michigan Un-
ion.

later have to be readmitted
mental hospitals, he continued.
The third is the selection
facilities, he said.,

to
of

Negative Criteria
"Up to now, selection has been
based on negative criteria-whom
houses do not want, such as al-
coholics and homosexuals, rather
than whom they do want.
"If transitional facilities are to
be effective, they will have to es-
tablish positive criteria. They will
have to act on the basis of whom
will do well," he commented.
The fourth problem is the cost
of maintaining the facilities, and
the fifth problem, the extent of
the need of the facilities.
"Some attempt should be made
to assess the need - otherwise,
how do we know how many to
establish?" Prof. Landy asked.
Prof. Landy noted halfway

houses are beneficial not only be-
cause they cushion the "shock"
of transition for the mental pa-
tient, but also because they blend
in with the community and give
him a place in it.
The halfway houses also give
continuity to mental treatment,
he added.
He described them as being dif-"
ferest from hospitals in four ways:
they are open systems, while hos-
pitals are closed; they are lay-
oriented while hospitals are )ro-
fessional-oriented; they provide an
independence-generating environ-
ment, while hospitals make pa-
tients feel dependent; and they
emphasize a non-patient role.
Prof. Landy, author of numer-
ous magazaine articles including
"The Problems of Seeking Help in
Our Society," was a researcher at
Harvard University before going to
Pittsburgh.
Morningside
Begins Corps
SIOUX CITY-Morningside Col-
lege has launched its own "Peace
Corps in Reverse" program.
Under the plan, 17 African stu-
dents are now receiving training
free of charge. r
An accelerated schedule will
graduate participants with bache-
lors' degrees in three years, and
the cost is borne by branches of
the Methodist Church.
Lawyers Appeal
Wingeart's Case
Attorneys for Jerald L. Wingeart,
former University student, in pris-
on for assaulting a blind girl and
robbing her escort last summer,
have begun an appeal to the Mich-
igan Supreme Court.

Of Projects
By MARK ALLYN
Prof. Robert Schnitzer, director
of the University Professional The-
atre Program, said he has "im-
pressive reports" of the value of
cultural exchanges.
Prof. Schnitzer claims that ex-
changes of performing artists have
"proven effectiveness" in improv-
ing relations.
He was speaking in regard to
the new cultural exchange to
which the United States and the
Soviet Union have agreed. The ex-
change involves the Benny Good-
man orchestra, the New York City
ballet, the Leningrad Philharmon-
ic, the Ukranian Dance Ensemble
and Bolshoi Theatre Ballet.
The 33-page agreement listed
exchanges in science, technology,
agriculture, construction, trade,
medicine, public health and sports
as well as the arts.
Joint Film
A joint film'involving producer
Lester Cowan and the largest So-
viet film studio was projected in
an agreement and announced by
Cowan.
Based on Edmund Wilson's
"Meeting at a Far Meridian," ap-
proximately one-fourth of the film
will be shot in the United States.
Filming is to begin early next year.
Prof. Schnitzer was "deeply im-
pressed" with Russian audiences
saying that "the Russian audi-

III

iI )

PROF. ROBERT SCHNITZER
. ..discusses culture
ences are very knowledgeable." He
attributed the success of Ameri-
can performers to "the people's
sincere desire to know more about
us and to the high artistry of the
American performers.
Positive Effect
Prof. William Ballis of the poli-
tical science department felt that
such an exchange would have a
positive effect on Soviet-United
States relations, adding that the
drama, music and ballet in the So-
viet Union are on ,a "very high
lexel." He warned, however, that
"Soviet films are instruments of
propoganda," saying that "pro-
ducers of art are ultimately re-
sponsible to the organs of the
Communist Party."
Prof. Claribel Baird of the
speech department agreed with
Ballis's view of Soviet culture.
However, propaganda infiltration
was "not true of the films I've
seen," Prof. Baird said.
Voice To Join
In Fund Drive
Voice political party will sell
educational materials about the
Southern civil rights movement in
the Fishbowl today and tomor-
row.
Included among the literature
will be a pamphlet written by for-
mer Daily editor Thomas Hayden,
'61, entitled "Revolution in Mis-
sissippi." This pamphlet, distrib-
uted by the Students for a Demo-
cratic Society, deals with the im-
portance of incidents which took
place in McComb, Mississippi
Voice will send the money re-
ceived from the sale of this lit-
erature to the Southern Student
Freedom Fund.

ctI

1.}

s

Use Our Convenient
Mician AdOGram

LINES,
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
,70
.85
1.00

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
3.45
4.20
4.95,

Just Fill In The
Following Form and
Send to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
420 MAYNARD
ANN ARBOR, MICH.

i

Phone NO 2-4786
1 :00 to 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.

sU
* r
DATES
TO RUN I
*r r
* NAME PHONE
* r
ADDRESS
Figure 5 overage words to aline.
- -
E I
*,U

11

i

Get rid of those mid-term blues at the
MNT E CIARL BAL L
this Saturday . . . from 9 P.M.-1 A.M.

I
1
1

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan