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March 09, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY

FEVAL CULTURE:
I'hrupp Views Role of Jews
4> ~ mmmanm mnm

By LOUISE LIND
of. Sylvia L. Thrupp, the Alice
man Palmer Professor of the,
Dry department, described the
of the Jews in the Middle
i Wednesday night.
er lecture, "The Jews as an
ient in Medieval Urban Cul-
," was the second in the se-
"An Inquiry into the Jew in
tern Civilization" currently
g sponsored by the Hillel
ndation.
>eaking of Medieval society as
here marginal area of civiliza-
" she broke the period down
three stages for discussion:
early Middle Ages from the
through the 11th centuries,
flowering of Medieval society
he 12th and 13th centuries,
the deterioration of the so-
by the *last quarter of the
Considerable Migration
wuring the first period, Europe
ived considerable migration of
s from Islam and the East,"
. Thrupp said. "Ultimately,
y of these came to hold ad-
.strative ' posts in the Royal
stee and were under the pro-
on of -emperors and kings."
tie second period, increased
sh migration wrought far
ter numbers from Spain and
East, Prof. Thrupp explained.
tetaining their administrative
ons, the Jewish groups found
aselves in a special situation
shared by other alien groups
edieval towns," she continued.
Need Full Protection
'hey had full protection and
government under the sover-
and, not being specialized in

PROF. SYLVIA THRUPP
. ..role of Jews

any trade, were able to have di-
rect contacts with officials and to
cross-cut the social lines of all
townsgroups.
"To say that the Jews were in
the town, but not of it is absurd!"
she asserted. "They were not citi-
zens,, but did have integral roles
to play."
Italian towns were particularly
friendly to Jewish groups, Prof.
Thrupp said. "The spirit in the
Italian towns was one of great re-
ligious tolerance. The mosaic of
religious beliefs in Italy lent itself
to many intellectual discussions
and clubs for this purpose."

"Jewish people in this period
were widely dispersed in little
towns all over Europe. In Italy
they were most prominent in medi-
cine; in Germany, law. The one or
two exceptionally rich Jews are
those about whom we know the
most; as traders, they dealt in the
typical miscellaneous commodi-
ties bought and sold by Medieval
tradesmen; as investors, they
bought property and loaned money
at an established rate of inter-
est."
"Jews were only allowed to hold
property within the town, since
that land in feudal tenure was;
connected with the Church and
the Europeans did not deem it
proper for Jews to have such an!
intimate connection with the
Church."
The last period designated by
Prof. Thrupp was one of finan-
cial desperation.An arrest of the
economic supply forced many out
of work and threw kings and
bankers into crisis.
Financial Upheaval
"By the 15th century, the peo-
Sple were getting used to this fi-
nancialupheaval, but thehkings
felt compelled to make war, hop-
ing to profit from the spoils and
to rally the people," Prof. Thrupp
said.
'aThe Church tightened its con-
trolshand thesmerchantsreinforc-
ed the Guilds in an attempt to
form a monopoly.
"The natural result were xeno-
phobic riots staged by the peas-
ants," she said. "These were the
background for the expulsions
which may be directly attributed
to the difficulties of the people
of the time who had no intellec-
tual opposition to their acts of
physical force."
YD's Support
SNCC Drive
The Young Democratic Club
passed a resolution at its meeting
last night to support the Southern
Student Freedom fund raising
campaign.
The Fund, under the auspices
of the National Student Associa-
tion, is conducting a series of fund
raising campaigns on college cam-
puses all over the country for the
benefit of the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee.
The campus fund drive is being
sponsored by Voice Political Party.
The Student Nonviolent Coordi-
nating Committee is in need of
funds to continue its civil rights
activities in the South. These ac-
tivities include voter registration,
legal aid and bail funds for jailed
students.

a A

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Group Seeks
Curriculum
Suggestions
The Literary College Steering
Committee began to formulate a
procedure enabling students to
submit curriculum suggestions to1
the Steering Committee at their
meeting yesterday.
Prof. William McKeachie, head
of the faculty curriculum commit-J
tee and of the psychology depart-
ment, has extended an invitation
to the Steering Committee to
bring curriculum suggestions be-
fore the faculty committee, Ruth
Galanter, '63, chairman of the
Steering Committee, said.
The steering committee is hop-
ing to get suggestions from any
literary college student. Students
with ideas will be asked to outline
course structure and content.
In addition to filling out a sug-1
gestion, form, students with con-J
crete ideas will have an oppor-
tunity to work with the Steering
Committee in formulating the1
proposal for that course before it;
is submitted to the curriculumJ
committee.1
Peace Group
Joins Voice
A group comprised of peopleJ
who participated in the Washing-1
ton Project and others interested
in the peace movement voted to
join Voice Political Party and to
work through the existing Voice
peace 'subcommittee at an orga-
nizational meeting last night.
The group elected William Der-
man, Grad, Carl Goldberg, '64, and
Richard Isaacs, '65, to a steering
committee which will head the
subcommittee. Marcella Arnow,
'63, was elected secretary.
At the meeting it was decidedJ
that those who wish to work with
the peace subcommittee but do
not wish to become dues paying
members of Voice would not be al-
lowed to vote on organizational'
matters.
The organizational meeting was
held to decide whether the ad hoc
group would form a campus chap-
ter of a national peace group or
work through an existing campus
organization. When it was decid-
ed that members of the group
would work with Voice on campus,.
they were told they could join a
national group on an individual
basis.
The new members of the peace
subcommittee will also work with
Voice on projects in other fields.
GOP OUtlines
New Platform
For Election
Ann Arbor Republicans adopted
their spring election platform
Wednesday night at a meeting
highlighted by Mayor Cecil .
Creal's keynote speech.
Mayor Creal called for support
of the five Republican city coun-
cil candidates, all incumbents,
citing their council experience and
activities.
The Republican platform states
that "government should act as
an agent of the people and should
assume only responsibilities that
private citizens cannot." It calls
for progressive development and
well-being of the city.
In the area of human rights,

the platform calls for equal pro-
tection of the law and civil rights,.
regardless of race, religion, or col-
or.
In areas of zoning, capital im-
provement, economic development,
city, planning, and taxes 'and re-
assessment, the platform com-
mends the council for its action
and encourages continuation of
current policies.
At the conclusion of the meet-
ing, the Republican .jouncil can-
didates spoke briefly. They pro-
posed to keep the budget within
the present tax structure and to
keep taxes at a minimum possible
level. Present city planning was
cited, as adequate, as was the
progress made by the city without
federal intervention.

By DONNA ROBINSON
Albert Einstein was more than a
scientific theorist; Prof. Cornelius
Lanczos of the Dublin Institute
for Advanced Studies, maintained
yesterday.
"He had certain insights into
the universe which are absolute-
ly final. He has opened doors
which will never be closed," he
said in the first of a series of
lectures on Einstein's place in the
history of physics.
Unmitigated Admiration
"If you mention the name Al-
bert Einstein anywhere in the
world the response will be one of
unmitigated admiration," Prof.
Lanczos said. But if you then ask
the layman what he knows about
Einstein, the nature and scope of
the achievements which have made
him one of the most respected
figures in modern history, the re-
sponse will be that he does not ex-
pect to gain the faintest under-
standing of Einstein's theories.The
layman knows that it has some-
thing to do with relativity, but no
more.
He does not understand that a
great deal of Einstein's thought
can be conveyed with a very min-
imum of technical terms, Prof.
Lanczos said. In fact, when Ein-
stein first began publishing his
work many scientists rejected it
because it was stated in such sim-
ple terms that they could not bring
themselves to believe it was really
serious scientific theorizing.
One of Einstein's first papers,
published in 1905 when he was
twenty-six, concerned his special
theory of relativity. This treatise
re-evaluated the customary ideas
of time and space. But it was still
not complete.
Theory of Relativity
In 1915 he published the work
which is universally recognized as
his greatest achievement-the gen-
eral theory of relativity. This
theory extended his general theory
to include matter as well as space
and time, and "fused the three in-
to a greater unity."
The theory of relativity is un-
doubtedly Einstein's greatest work.
"All of the others could have been
discovered by other scientists and
may be changed in time," Prof.

1ST LECTURE:
Lanczos Hails Einstein
As More Than Theorist

PROF. CORNELIUS LANCZOS
... on Einstein
Lanczos said. But nevertheless, the
great mass of work which he did
besides relativity has been of tre-
mendous value in the history of
physics.
For instance, his explanation of
the Br6wnian motion forced most
of those scientists who at the be-
ginning of the century still did
not believe the atomic theory of
matter to accept it.
JOIN:."
T H E
THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
STAFF r

1011111 col itI i
IE 'I 111 m 1111111 milli 1(! IIIl II( udlN( u h I f

,,1 °

GREAT
LOVERS
OF
HISTORY...
. Like a Small
Voice in the Wind,
Our Lovers and
Those of Yesteryear,
Often Hear
That
Plaintive Whisper .. .

......:...T~
Josephine elba-ed her way
into Napoleon's life. Her
previous husband had been
guillotined, whence comes
the term "Napoleon Slice."
He used the same slice in
golf which is why they call
a creek hazard a water-loo.
Henry VIFI and the Big VI.
Five of the six wives got be-
hind the Vill-ball because
Henry had a suspicious na-
turethat kept Boleyn over,
To be a queen was axeing a
lot in those days.
When good Queen Bess near-
ly muddled through a pud-
die, Sir Walter's sport coat
provided the first red carpet
treatment and gave BBC a
great idea for a dry cleaning
commercial.

"PILLOW TALK" PLAYMATES ARE AT IT AAMN 9
ROCK HUDSON
DORIS DAYh
2ToNy RANDALL,
) n L Aa Coto 4
EDIE ADAMS JACK OAI(IE-JACK KRUSCHEN'

..." ,,u millCIIi~u "
DIAL NO 5-6290
"COMEDY PRIZE

AGAIN
3rd BIG WEEK I
OF TH E SEASON !"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune

ITt1'1 lilY

... . .

31

'II

yr

OW:.

CAMPUS

DIAL
NO 8-6416

LOCK"TICKET SALES
CONTINUE TODAY

' To Offer
Scholarships
The University Committee on
Chinese Student Scholarships will
award $80, enough for a full year's
school expenses, to each of three
Formosan nursing students, Rob-
ert B. Klinger, committee chair-
man, said yesterday.
The students, now attending the
Taiwan Provincial Junior College
of Nursing, are the first to be se-
lected by the five-member faculty-
student committee.
Money for the scholarships
comes from the J. Raleigh Nelson
Scholarship Fund, the W. Carl,
Rufus Memorial Funds and the
Ann Arbor Western Kiwanis Club,
and will be used to provide annual
awards to selected Chinese stu-
dents "studying in China," Klinger
said.
Survey, Shows
'U' Ranks High
A recent survey in the Journal
of Engineering Education reported
that the University ranks among
the nation's top three producers
of both graduate and bachelor's
degree engineers.
The University was the only one
of the top five schools in each
degree categorythat ranked third
or better in each. The categories
were bachelor's, master's, and doc-
torate degrees.
In undergraduate education, the
College of Engineering granted
640 bachelor's degrees to engi-
neers in academic 1960-61. The
University of Illinois and Purdue
University exeeced this number
with 847 and 807, respectively.
Master's degrees were conferred
by the University on 338 full-time
engineering students, while the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology granted 505 master's de-
grees. In doctoral education the
University ranks third with 53
PhD's.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
DAME
JUDITH ANDERSON
(...oa p'I 1eteit 11s71h9 actre44 ... N.Y. HERALD-TRIBUNE

rammmmmmu mmmammmmmmmu
20% SPECIAL
ISTUDENT
. DISCOUNT
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playing her two
greatest roles

11

for

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'$4
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a climactic condensation of
Robinson Jeffers' vivid drama'
£E4 mactet
television's 1961 emmy award for

'-62

SOUNDS

FROM THE

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.1 R......~ best performance by an actress
HILL AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, MAC 298:3.0 P.M.

THE NATION'S GREATEST
COLLEGIATE VOCAL GROUPS
IN CONCERT

j

I

Hill Box Office Opens Monday, 1'to 4



Featuring
0 THE FRIARS

* THE ARBORS

!THE CUYAHOGA WAITERS OF CORNELL
* THE DQ'S OF AMHERST
* THE QUINTONES FROM WAYNE STATE
* THE TRINIDADS OF TRINITY COLLEGE

DIAL 2-6264
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MINKOVACS
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ORCH. $4.00, 1 st BAL. $3.50 and $3.00, 2nd BAL. $2.00 and $1.00

S.G.oCo cihemaIffquild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
QUEEN CHRISTINA George Stevens' SHANE

IL

SATURDAY, MARCH 17

Q" In a M

Q.'2 D KAili l AiIBTflPIIIM1/

I

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