100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1962 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THNE MICIGAN T JAIIT

'FISCAL OBLIVION':
Republicans Attack Swainson's Tax Program

E TRIM ..

Oppenheimer Says
U.S. Wastes Talent

ARCADE BARBERS
Nickels Arcade
Ann Arbor, Michigan

r 11OCO'

'Ii

;,,, ,,,..s._. ,.....
Jl tq )a .
1 .
_,
, ..' ,.
e'
,,r_
.i r
..t " "
' i .
- - '

Our.

(Continued from Page 1)
the $518 million annually which
everyone in Michigan must pay
toward the federal tax bill. There
were no references to exemptions."
House Taxation Committee
Chairman Rollo Conlin (R-Tip-
ton) and House Ways and Means
Committee Chairman Arnell E.
Engstrom (R-Traverse City) chal-
lenged the legality of the food and
drug exemption, saying that a
1946 1'constitutional amendment
froze the tax base - and only a
referendum could change it.
Conlin rapped the exemptions,
SPECIAL
CAMPUS PRICES
Post 20 wks. $1.79 Q; 35 wks.
$3.15 Ql; yr. $4.00 El
Ladies Home Journal 5 mos.
$1.25 LI; 8 mos. $2.00 El;
yr. $2.50 El
Holiday 5 mos. $1.50 Q-;
8 mos. $2.40 [; yr. $3.60 Q
Life 20 wks. $1.99 ;
yr. $4.00 E; 2 yrs. $7.00 Q
Time 27 wks. $1.97 Q;
yr. $3.87 Q; 2 yrs. $7.00
Sports Illustrated yr. $4.00 Q;
2 yrs. $7.50 El
Fortune yr. $7.50fl
Arch. Forum yr. $3.25 Ql
Newsweek 34 wks. $2.50 fl
yr. $3.00
ON ABOVE PUBLICATIONS
SEND NO MONEY NOW
PUBLISHER WILL BILL YOU
Atlantic 8 mos. $3.00Ql
Hi Fidelity 8 moas. $2.00 El
Jack and Jill yr. $3.55 E;
2 yrs. $6.95 El
Look yr. $4.00 El
Nation yr. $6.00 Q
Playboy yr. $5.00 El
New Republic yr. $5.00 El
New Yorker 8 mos. $3.00 El
Readers' Digest 1f mos. $1.87 Q
Saturday Review yr. $4.00 El
2 yrs. $7.00 El
Scientific American yr. $6.00 El
U.S. News & World Report
39 wks. $3.67 [}
Reporter 10 mos. $3.27 Q
STUDENT
PERIODICAL
AGENCY
BOX 1161,, ANN ARBOR
For Rates on Other
Magazines, Call
NO 2-3061
Days and Evenings

saying they would "throw the;
school aid formula out of line."
Two per cent of sales tax receipts
go to schools.
And even Lt. Gov. T. John.
Lesinski agreed that this would
affect school taxes and result in
"far-reaching difficulties for local'
units."
Sen. Carleton Morris (R-Kal-
amazoo) belabored the governor
for "relieving the business taxes
and dumping the whole load on
the individual taxpayer."
Rep. Gail Handy (R-Eau Claire)
said that Gov. Swainson had pro-
posed increased taxes on the in-
dividual "because he has no
powerful lobbyists. He can't fight
back." /
'Last Straw'
Speaker Pro-Tem Wilfred G.
Bassett (R-Jackson) warned that
the income tax rate would "go up

I JUNIORS, SENIORS & GRADUATE STUDENTS

and up. This additional dip into
the families income will be the
last straw."
Senate GOP Caucus Leader
Frank Beadle (R-St. Clair) said
the governor shunned the problem
of the intangibles tax on stocks,
bonds and dividends. "That's no-
thing but an income tax, and this
new levy would result in double
taxation."
Gov. Swainson told the law-
makers that "ve shall have fiscal
reform in Michigan. It is inevit-
able. The forces which forecast
this inevitability are three:
"1) A continuing healthy ad-
herence to basic democratic prin-
ciples and the demand for the
equitable taxation that these prin-
ciples entail.
"2) The emerging drive for eco-
nomic productivity that will be

ON-CAMPUS
UC INTERVIEWS

satisfied with nothing less than
full employment of all of Micnl-
gan's resources.
"3) The inherent desire of all
of us to achieve a higher standard
of living-our enrichment of civil-
ization will progress only as far as
we devote resources to it."
Praises Recovery
Handy termed those statements
inconsistent with the rest of the
message. He said the governor put
all the blame for Michigan's ills
on fiscal problems but, at the same
time, praised the state's recent
economic recovery.
He approved of Swainson's pro-
posed tax relief in other areas but
said an income tax would just
undo all that good work.
Speaker Pears felt that the sen-
timent in the lower house had
reversed from that of three years
ago, when the House approved an
income tax, but Sen. Harry R.
Litowich (R-Benton Harbor)ysaid
that the Senate was unpredictaole.
"Some Republicans could go either
way."
Predict Extent
Of Hay Fever
A means for predicting the se-
verity of the hay fever season has
now been. developed by three Uni-
versity meteorologists.
Using pollen counts, weather re-
ports, probability theory, and a
computer, James R., Harrington
and Professors Edward S. Epstein
and A. Nelson Dingle of the en-
gineering mechanics department
told a New York meeting of the
American Meteorological Society
that a fair prediction could be
made.
Although this method can deter-
mine severity, a number of other
factors-such as the worst day of
the season-remain unpredictable,
they noted.

By MICHAEL JULIAR
America is a wasteful society
in general and is not making full
use of her scientific talents, Dr.
J. Robert Oppenheimer, a nuclear
physicist, told a news conference
at the University recently.
"We are wasting many of our
scientists in administrative and
committee jobs. Many geniuses are
left to languish," he said.
Former director of the Los
Alamos scientific laboratory i hat
played the key role in develop-
ing the atomic bomb, Oppenheim-
er is now the director of the In-
stitute of Advanced Study at
Princeton University.
More Scientists
Oppenheimer stressed the need
for more scientists. "Science is one
field in which I believe in over-
production. Sciencegrows like aA
organism and is not built like a
bridge."
Predicting the greatest advance
in science in the immediate years
ahead would be in fundamental
biology, he pointed to the struc-
tural ahd kinetic aspects of the
field, such as reproduction and
metabolism.
Oppenheimer also predicted that
physicists would know about the
elements of matter much better
by the end of the decade. In ad-
dition, nuclear engines would
probably be used not only for
naval craft, but for rocket pro-
pulsion, he said.
Phoenix Project.
The University's Phoenix project
impresses -him because of its
soundness and vitality." It has the
"sense, balance, and frugality that
private enterprises possess more
so than government scientific en-
terprises," he commented.
Describing disarmament as a
matter of concern, Oppenheimer
cited the worth of saving a life'
and approved the government pro-
gram of civil defense.

J. OPPENHEIMER
.. . sees scientific waste

VALENTINES

FEB. 28-MARCH 1
" Indicates Permanent and Summer Positions Available In These Fields:
CHEM. Ch.E. M.E. E.E. TECH. ECON.
BUS. ADM. ACCTG. ECON. IND. MGMT./ADMIN.

will really
grab you

VISIT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE NOW
TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT'

OVER 500
CONTEMPORARY VALENTINES
to choose from

If personal interview is inconvenient, write to college Relations Division
:SUN O1L COMPANY
1608 Walnut Street Philadelphia 3, Penna.

cat

CHE STER ROBERTS
312 S. State 1203 S. University

"It is insurance against a cra
world. I am disturbed by thc
who denounce it and by those w
want to extend it as an emergen
measure," he said.
He added that any great di
of certainty or dogmatism abo
the coming age bothers him.
Oppenheimer, answering a que
tion on students pursuing the fiE
of science as a life study, said th
"students don't need lecturers I
cause they can use books, but th
do need teachers. They must ha
a sense of freedom. There a
many different roles that a scie
tists can take up."
Scientist TaIM
On Symmetr
Dr. J. Robert Oppenhein
traced the "Symmetries of Matte
from snow crystals to atomic pa
ticles for a capacity' audience
the Rackham lecture hall z
cently.
A nuclear physicist and direc'
of the Institute for Advanc
Study at Princeton University, C
penheimer gave the second annl
Dewey F. Fagerburg memorial le
ture.
The idea of symmetry is th
things are not as different as th
could be.
He cited the regularity of
snow crystal or the petals of
flower as common examples
symmetry.
In the new idea of dynami,
symmetry is' a problem of mot
he said. The problem is unalter
by a set of transformations. T
usefulness of the idea of symmet
may lie in the invariance of
motion.
"We are dealing with a woi
in which things are not stab
they appear 'and disappear.
this chaos the knowledge of syr
metry is valuable," he continu(
He outlined for the audier
the symmetry in basic atomic pa
ides discovered this century, c
serving that symmetry describ~
a large part of the story of atorr
processes.
"But we are like the pioneers
the quantum theory-very f
from a synthesis.
"The excitement and thedep
of what we are "doing is sober,
by the realization that this ti.
man may understand it."

SU ET

dal

As soon

as the weather gets better

you'll be able to bike instead of walk;

and the place.

To Buy Your Bike

} it Who
0 What's your
favorite-
kind of date?

is the greatest living American?

Is

1~7

w

BEAVER'S BIKE & HARDWARE
605 CHURCH
Beaver's is also the place to get your bike repaired.

a

.:

I

O Do you smoke
an occasional pipe
as well as cigarettes?

Q

UAR RY nc

320 South- State -221.5 West Stadium Blvd.

3..
y

d

'U-

L ,.

C dance

3 houseparty

1 walk& talk

C3 a few brews with friends

0 Yes

1 No

It's the rich-flavor
leaf among L&M's
choice tobaccos
that gives you
MORE BODY in

Ni

Jim

a~ ooyvaoa sSMJw !4131
saNXI la
TAFrir

lo-.--

HERE'S HOW 1029 STUDENTS
AT 100 COLLEGES VOTED!
A 9t'.''"'""'' H® .SOS
%W'~~W~OD

I

%OZ**SPU014 411M
smojq ma; e_

WORLD FAMOUS COSMETICS - COMPLETE PHOTO DEPARTMENT

I

I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan