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February 09, 1962 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

sN THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRID

AY, FEBRI

RN TOWARD PEACE':
tudents To Confront Officials

Composers To Perform
At Festival of Premieres

..

By FRED RUSSELL KRAMER
An ad hoc University committee
et yesterday and completed plans
send two busloads of University
idents to Washington next
eekend, where they- will join
)00 other students in the "Turn
owards Peace" movement, an
fort to. promote disarmament.
The students will present to
mngressmen and other public of-
cials a program of initiatives
signed to limit the arms race
reduction of tension.
Financial Support
Richard Flacks, Grad, spokes-
an for the committee, says that
iancial support has been re-
ived from Prof. Kenneth Bould-
g of the economics department
id other members of the faculty.
The trip is sponsored by the
olitical Issues Club and has been
,lendered by Student Govern-
ent Council.
The group will hold a final
eeting at 4 p.m. Wed. in Rm.
D of the Michigan Union. Cost
r the trip, including sleeping
commodations, will be $15."
The buses will leave at 6 p.m.
hurs. In front of the Michigan
pion.
Confrontation
In Washington, members of the
oup will speak with Senators,
:ngressmen, cabinet memoers
id other key government officials
discuss disarmament issues.
uring this period, other students
sroup lans
Winter Retreat

will picket various governmental
agencies, embassies and the White
House and the Soviet embassy.
On Saturday dispersed picketing
wil continue until late in the
afternoon. Then the more than
5,000 students will meet on Con-
stitution Ave. and march silently
down the street towards George
Washington University Auditor-
ium where they will hear speeches
from key leaders in the peace
movement.
Speakers will include Emil
Mazey, Norman Thomas, Prof. Leo
Szilard of the University of Chi-
cago, Sen. Hubert Humphrey (D-
Minn).

Among the movement's spon-
sors is Mrs. Franklin D. Roose-
velt, Prof. Hans Morgenthau of
the University of Chicago, Prof.
David Riesman of Harvard Uni-
versity, Prof. Henry Steele Com-
mager of Amherst College, Pro-
fessors Mark Van Doren and Eric
Bentley of Columbia University,
Norman Cousins, Edmund Wilson
and Harold Taylor.
In addition, petitions are being
circulated by members of Voice
political party and other groups.
The petitions; which will be sent
to President John F. Kennedy, ask
support of the program's initia-
tives.

SGC, Evaluates Its Goals
At Two-Day Conference

Fourteen members of Student
Government Council are study-
ing basic Council problems at a
retreat yesterday and today at
Fresh Air Camp.
Designed to aid the Council in
its deliberation, the two-day re-
treat will consist of group meet-
film by' the Group Dynmaics cen-
ings, two man sessions, and a
Research, entitled "Invisible Com-
ter of the Institute for Social
mittees."
The group meeting will discuss
three questions, "What is the pur-
pose of Student Government
Council?" "Is the Council fulfill-
ing this purpose adequately?" and
"What is the proper purpose for
a student government?"
Subsidiary questions to be con-
sidered are the purposes of jobs
of Council members and their re-
lation to the student community,
and the means for doing this job.
The Council will also evaluate
this work in relation to these
goals.
The means of compromise for
achieving effective legislation will
be considered.
The meetings will not adhere
closely to these topics, but will be
open for discussion of related
questions and problems. This tech-
nique is modeled after a summer
conference in student leadership

held in Bethel, Me., which four
Council members attended.s
The two-person meetings will
allow individual Council members
to go over the issues raised in the
group meetings in greater depth.
"Invisible Committees" analy-
ses committee meetings to explore
problems and pressures of its
members and how to overcome'
them.]
Thief Removes
$1800 Mural
A tapestry valued at $1,800 was
stolen during intersession from the
Michigan Union.
The 9' x 12' tapestry had been
hung from a rod on the wall just
north of the double doors in the
Union's main lobby.
Police could offer no clues as
to the identity of the thief, the
whereabouts of the tapestry or
how it was removed.
Union General Manager Frank-
lin Kuenzel said the mural appar-
ently was stolen "about 10 days
ago," although there may have
been a lapse of perhaps one or
two days between the theft and
the discovery by a janitor of the
tapestry's disappearance. I

By MALINDA BERRY
Thirty-seven contemporary com-
posers will perform ONCE each in
a series of six concerts sponsored
by, the Dramatic Arts Center en-
titled "ONCE: A Festival of Mu-
sical Premieres."
A number of the presentations
will be American or world pre-
mieres. The conceft is organized
by a group of composers in this
area and will include concerts by
internationally acclaimed com-
posers and performers of con-
temporary music, along with con-
certs produced by local profes-
sional musicians.
On Avant-Garde
The avant-garde element of the
music world will be represented
by such "far-out" selections as
an experimental dramatic film
with electronic sound-tract, which
will be the special feature of one
of the concerts.
The concerts will cover two
weekends with six performances,
Feb. 9, 10, 11 and Feb. 16, 17, 18
at the First Unitarian Church.
On the Feb. 18 concert, the
ONCE festival concludes with a
special concert of electronic music.
"Composition for Synthesizer" by
Milton Babbitt was designed for
realization on the Electronic Mu-
sic Synthesizer at Columbia Uni-
versity and is the first musical
product of that instrument.
Other music, no less modern in
composition but on more tradi-
tional instruments includes, "So-
nata for Piano" by Gregory Kos-
teck, and "Sonatine for Flute and
Piano" by Pierre Boulez.
Paul Jacobs, pianist, will play for
the third concert of the series
works by Bennett, Boulez, Rey-
nolds, Schoenberg and Stock-
hausen.
Premiere 'Bestiary'
The ONCE Chamber Orchestra
conducted by Wayne Dunlap, will
premiere "Bestiary I: Eingang" by
George Cacippo, and "Patterns" by
Bruce Wise, and will direct the
rarely performed "Hyperprism" by
Edgard Varese. Also featured will
be the guest composer Morton
Feldman, who will conduct a
chamber ensemble in his own com-
position, "Durations." -
The fifth program will bring
the Dorian Woodwind Quintet
playing worqs by the American

i

The Office of Religious Affairs
sponsoring a Winter Retreat on
tterson Lake. The bus leaves
night at 7:30 p.m. and will re-
rn on Sunday.
The weekend will feature fresh
, "to ventilate musty ideas and
ile dreams, and to revive tired
dies"; folk singing and dancing;
.d "time: to read a book to throw
snowball, to talk, to be alone."
The highlight of the weekend
11 be Prof. Victor H. Miesel, pre-
nting and discussing contem-
rary art and how it relates to
lues, reality and life.

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