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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1964 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VIOLENT ARGUMENT:
Moscow, Peking Appear Locked in Feud

By WILLIAM L. RYAN,
Associated Press Special Correspondent
Five distinct violent arguments
separate Moscow and Peking to-
day, and Communists seem to be
losing hope of keeping their world
edifice from cracking apart.
Desperate attempts by Com-
munist leaders to produce a truce
run into obstacles raised by ideo-
logical, territorial, economic, mili-
tary and national interest clashes
dividing the two countries.
Any one of these arguments
would be enough to abrade their
relations. The existence of all at
one time appears to make the di-
vision unbridgeable. The final
break seems to be getting nearer.
Basically Peking fights what
pro-Chinese Communists have

come to call "Khrushchevism," in
dubious tribute to Soviet Premier
Nikita Khrushchev. Not to be out-
done, Moscow has paid a similar
left-handed compliment to Chinese
leader Mao Tze-Tung by inventing
a new sin: "Maotzetungism."
Palmiro Togliatti, chief of the
Italian Communist Party which is
the most influential outside the
bloc, has been begging Moscow to
"avoid the method of summary
excommunication" which he says
was a mistake when Stalin ex-
pelled Yugoslavia in 1948. Togliat-
ti told his central committee re-
cently that however annoying it
might be, the Moscow-Peking de-
bate should go on, because in any
final break "repercussions to our

Kl Seeks More
Education Research.

entire movement could be very
serious."
In Moscow, at a Lenin anniver-
sary meeting, Soviet Party Secre-
tary Y. V. Andropov said it was
nonsense to contend that Moscow
was "striving" to expel China from
the Red Camp. It is not "striving,"
perhaps, but this remark indicat-
ed Moscow might feel forced even-
tually to take the step.
Maotzetungism
Andropov, in the same speech,
unveiled "Maotzetungism" as a sin,
while accusing Mao of trying tol
seize Communism's world leader-
ship.
"In the struggle for hegemony,"
said Andropov, "the Chinese lead-
ers are increasingly and openly
replacing Leninism with Maotze-
tungism, maintaining that Mao-
tzetungism is the chief element
while Leninism is secondary ..,
Chinese propaganda openly main-
tains that Mao tze-Tung's ideas
are a higher incarnation of Marx-
ism-Leninism."
What are Moscow and Peking
fighting about? These, in brief, are
the principal arguments:
-Ideological:
This has two aspects. One con-
cerns world Communist policy, the
other the internal development of
Communist countries.
Sells World Revolution
Peking says Khrushchev sc*';
world revolution down the river
for lack of aggressive support to
violent uprisings against establi,-
ed regimes, especially in under-
developed countries. Khrushchev
is pictured as cringing before
United States nuclear might and
the possibility of general ar.
The Chinese also resent Fhrush-

chev's criticisms of their inters al
development. Khrushchev scoffs
at China's attempt at a "great1
leap forward" to Commumsm by
the route of people's com u-!x-
and hasty industrialization.
On the other hand, the .nise
call Khrushchev the worst of de-
viationists for claiming that the
USSR is classless and thjs no
longer needs a dictator-kp of the
proletariat.
-Territorial:
The Chinese are on the verge
of branding Khrushchev colonial-j
ist. They have spoken poimedly of
"unequal treaties" imposed on
China by both Tsarist and Soviet
governments. They indicate cleaf y
a revived interest in Chinese
claims on Asian territo'ies now
Soviet or Soviet-controlled.
Economic:
The Chinese long ago complain-
ed that Moscow was more gen-
erous in aid to anti-Communist
regimes-like India and Egypt-
than to China.
Military :
Clearly the Chinese have been.
enraged over lack of Soviet eni-
thusiasm for Peking's development
of nuclear weapons. The Russians'
have withheld help for Chinese
development of nuclear weapons.
-Clash of national interests:
This stems from Chinese anbi-
tions in Asia, primarily. Moscow
recently accused Peking of trying
to read the USSR out of Asia.
At a meeting in Indonesia con-
sidering a new Asian-African con-
ference, the Chinese oppo adi an
invitation to the USSR, on
grounds that it is not a.s Asian
nation despite vast Siberian and
Central Asian territor es.

Reinstate
Newspaper
By RITA DERSHOWITZ
Collegiate Press Service
NEW YORK-The Arrow, stu-
dent newspaper of Hunter Col-
lege, will split into two separate,
single-campus papers next fall as
part of the agreement which
brought it back to the stands May
4 after a one week suspension.
The paper has operated on a
bi-campus basis since its forma-
tion, but it has become increas-
ingly difficult to coordinate news
coverage and staffs at both the
Bronx and Park Avenue branches
of the school. The proposed split
was one of the issues causing in-
ternal dissension within the paper
which led to the temporary sus-
pension.

GRADUATION
TIME GIFTS
Grundig AM-FM transistor radio
aspecial $39.95
BELL % TR Stereo top recorder
T hat makes tape copies
all by itself
Jensen speakers *KLH portables
EICO, Dyna Hi-Fi kits
World Famous Grundig
Tape recorder for under $100
All available at HI Ft STUDIO
1319 S. University Ave.
1 Block from Washtenaw
Look for HI Fl on awning-
NO 8-7942
READ THE
GENERATION
SUMMER ISSUE

<*

Mr

WASHINGTON -

America'sl

most important business-educa-
tion-spends a dangerously low
percentage of its available reve-
nue on research compared with
the research allocations of indus-
try.'
This was the message United
States Commissionerof Educa-
tion Francis Keppel brought to a
meeting of' educators last night,;
the Washington Post reports.
He told them that in an era
when "most U.S. industries spend;
.ip to 10 per cent of their reve-
nues on research--$18 billion a
ear-less than one-tenth of one
?er cent of all funds expended
for education is spent on research
Learning Research
And this figure is "an improve-
rnent on the past."
Keppel, speaking at the Nation-
al Education Association's Con-
gress on Instruction, said that
learning research is "under-val-
ued, under-financed and under a
cloud."
Too much of the research which
has been done has been done by
second raters who have focused
:n "miniature, obscure and non-
controversial issues, projects sel-
dom worth the serious attention
of administrators of teachers," he
asserted.
More and More
Education development has en-
tered on providing more of what
already exists, "more classrooms,
more courses, more visual aids,
more techers, most of whom are'
not using what we already know
as the result of research."
For this reason, Keppel said
good research has been adopted
in a "painfully slow" fashion.
He. cited the "classic example"

of a span of 60 years between
the establishment of the first pub-
lic kindergarten in America in 1873
and its general adoption by pub-
lic school systems.
The average lag between medi-
cal research and its application is
about two years, he said. "In
education the process often takes
30 years or more."
"Educational research is now
making significant new begin-
nings," Keppel said, "but they can
succeed only with the concerted
interest and effort of educators."~

GRADUATION GIFTS
Seeour
Graduation Window"
A Complete Selection
of Gifts will be on Display
for Your Convenience.
MUSIC CENTER fne
304 Thayer 1304 S. University

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for
Ann Arbor's Most Complete
Selection of Gifts
for
Mother on Her Day

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COME TO THE FAIR!
THE TOURIST IS WELCOME!
WE
SERVE
YOU!
Hundreds of families have registered their
extra rooms with us. These people are the
gracious New Yorkers with private homes
who want to say "Welcome to New York."
There are rooms available for every
puyrse-y
Stay a week, a month or plan your'

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A NEW HEIGHT IN LIVING!
HURON TOWERS
2200 Fuller Road

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pool, sun-
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conditioned. Furnished or unfurnished. Courtesy bus to
campus. Located near North Campus with a beautiful.
view of the Huron River and of surrounding Ann Arbor.

summer in New York-
THE STUDENT IS WELCOME
MAY WE HELP YOU?
VISITORS' TEMPORARY RENTAL SERVICE

GIFTS OF QUALITY

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Model Suites Open
Daily 9-6 P.M.
Sun. 12-6. P.M.

Rental from $115
Phone 663-0800

220 W. 42 St.
PE 6-1953

New York City
Rm. 1914

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-all under $4.00 -
FOR MOTHER'S DAY

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meet Mrs.
Schaefer,
PHTwfe
PHT, as you may know,
stands for Putting Hubby
Through. And that's pre-
cisely what Beverly
Schaefer is helping to do
-put her hubby through
Hofstra University,
Hempstead, N. Y. She's a
part-time Tupperware
dealer, demonstrating and
selling those fine plastic
food containers at home
parties. It's profitable. It's
enjoyable. It's easy.
Whether you're a PHT
wife yourself or a stu-
dent, ask your campus
Financial Aid Director
about it, and call your lo-
cal Tupperware distribu-
tor, listed in the Yellow
Pages under Plastics or
Housewares. Or send in
this coupon-... -
,~ * ._ %- C3, by
Good ouse png PARE
U - ARATE PAEN

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ELEGANT ENTERTAINMENT
High style Hallmark Playing
Cards come in decorator designs
and colors with lacquered edges,
deluxe plastic finish, luxury size.
Double deck in gift case, $2.95.

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COMI
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and theF
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion,
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and SermonF
Breakfast at Canterbury House
1 1:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Proer anddcommentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12: 10 P.M. Holy Communion.

TOKEN OF THOUGHTFULNESS
For a gift that keeps on giving, select a Hallmark
Thoughtfulness Album from two styles -expand-.
ing gusset file or book style. Each contains an
assortment of Hallmark cards, $3.95 gift-boxed.

7c)

C H UR CrH

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SMART SET
Elegant green initial on snowy
white, 3-ply facial tissue. 50
Hallmark luncheon napkins.
$1.25; 50 beverage napkins, $1.00;
50 coasters, $1.00 ; 24 book
matches, $1.00; 25 towels, $1.00.

FASHIONABLE AND FRAGRANT
New Hallmark Sachet Notes, delicately scented
with Arpege fragrance by Lanvin. 10 Notes in
an attractive gift box with matching sachet, $1.00.
Perfect for party prizes, shower gifts, thank-you's.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Woshtenow Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Patricio Pickett
Stoneburner.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Woshtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
SUNDAY
Services at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Stndav's
Sermon: "We Commend You to God," by
the Pastor.
Gamma Delta cost supper-Sunday evening at
6:00 (no program).
Wednesday, May 13 - Mid-week devotions.
Sermonette by the Vicar.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenow
The Rev. Donald Postern-a
Sponsored b the Christian Reformed Chutche
at Michigan.
Mvorning Worship-10700 am.

8 'tr

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2/56

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WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
668-6881
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Camp is Minister- Eugene Ronsom
Associate Campus Minister-Jeon Robe
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-
"That the Next Generation May Know,"
Dr. Rupert will be speaking.
Communion on May 13, 7:00 a.m. followed by
breakfast-out by 8 a.m.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West t iherty Street
Rolph 8. Piper, David Brocklein,
Fred Holtfreter. Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and II :00 am.
Holy Commnion - Second Sunday of every
month.
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Nurserv facilities during worship services and
church school
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave,
Rev Ernest K loiidt Pastor
Rev. A. C Bizer. Associate Pastor
9:33 a m. German Worship Service in Chapel.
9:30 and 10.45 a.m Worship Service.
9:30 and 1045 am. Church School.
E7:.00 p m Student Guild.

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A Multitude of Gift Ideas for Mother in One Gift
U-m- -

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
i All Wnch-nn Av

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