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April 30, 1964 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-30

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PAGE EIGHT

THE, MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PARADOX?:
U.S. Considers Red Trade

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By JAMES MARLOW
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON -Two stories
which came out on the same day}
may seem ironic to American allies
and the communist world but
make sense to the Lyndon B.^
Johnson administration.
This one yesterday: : 3<
Undersecretary of State George
Ball told United States allies that
selling locomotives to Cuba (the
French are reported considering
it) "would have an even greater
impact" in support of Fidel Castro,
than the recent sale of British
buses.
And this one yesterday:
The United States is seriouslyf
considering the sale of synthetic
rubber plants to Communist Ro-
mania authoritative sources re- -
ported J. WILLIAM FULB
Why would it be wrong-from
the American view-for an ally to The U.S. wants to str
sell Castro locomotives but per-
haps all right for the U.S. to sell tro economically and
a synthetic rubber plant to Ro- him or force change
mania since both countries are munismin Cuba. How
linked to Russia? Cott shutting off all
To mix the picture up some him, particularly in. i
more: The allies have sold many might help him survi
things to Communist countries And, the thinking
and this country has given assist- harder up he is, the
ance to Yugoslavia sold wheat to drain he will be on Rr
Russia and had good tariff rela- is now estimated to be]
tions with Poland. - at the rate of about
a day.
Ball said in a speecd
41 " fU Collegesoke, Va., that the I
would help the Cuba
T because its main expo
o Solve Issue carried to port almost
rail and her railroad
. (Continued from Page 2) "presently in a critic
disrepair."
college success for the many He explained that w
schools. is not a military thi
"They can use some additional United States it is a
education but who would suffer menace to Latin Ameri
in competition against better pre- ing to subvert goverr
pared white students.". set off terror campaig
Speaking of -Southern institu- But Romania is c!
tions formerly restricted to whites, leading example of a
Dennis said, "Indications are that nation trying to loos
they will continue to provide only with Moscow and is bi
limited opportunities for Negroes."
He cited three main reasons for
this situation:
Formerly white institutions are
financially beyond the reach of
most Negro students;'
Negro youth from segregated
schools, which are often infer-.x
for to white schools, will not be as
well prepared at white applicants,
Many Negro students and par-
ents will wish to avoid the ten
sions and social limitations of an
overwhelmingly white milieu."j
Negro students also have prob-
lems with Northern and Weestern
schools which have "long since
taken on all the trappings of non-
discrimination," Dennis said.
Contributing to these problems,
enntis explained, are: high tub-
tion; lack of available scholar-
ships,, ineffective elementary and
secondary guidance and counsel-
ing and "standard testing mater-
"als which do not represent cul-
tural differences.
"At present the Negro is large-
ly outside the mainstream of
American education, and particu
larly of American higher educa-
tion.
STU
IV
I 's PI..8,.
g
I~a ' yA/L y y ( }
M1iI I~'M"V~

ing trade with other Western na-
tions.
An ally might ask: "If Castro
can't get help from any of the
Western nations and therefore
must rely more and more on Mos-
cow then wouldn't his ties with
Russia be strengthened instead of
weakened?
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
has acknowledged that the United
States threats different Commun-
ist countries differently, and he
gave three reasons. to encourage
the individual Communist nations
toward more independence and
internal freedom; to try to work
out relations or agreements with
various Communist states to re-
duce the danger of war; and to
make the expansion of Commun-
ism too costly to be worthwhile,
which is what this country hopes
in the case of its boycott on Cuba.
But-the American attempt to
get its allies and friends to boy-
cott Casro is far from successful.
The French have sold him about
$10 million in trucks, the British
about $11 million in buses. Yugo-
slavia, Spain and Morocco have
dealt with him.
Last month Sen. J. William Ful-
bright (D-Ark), chairman of the
Senate's foreign relations com-
mittee, said the U.S. economic
policy-toward Cuba is a failure.
"I am not arguing against the
desirability of a boycott but
against its feasibility. It is simply
not within our power to compel
our allies to cut off trade with
Cuba unless we are prepared to
take drastic sanctions against
them."
The United States hasn't shown
any willingness to invoke drastic
sanctions. It has tried mild ones.
Meanwhile, the Western nations,
seeing their chance to make a
buck, do more and more trading
with Communism. In 1961, the
last year for which complete fig-
t ures are available, the Communist
s bloc imported $5 billion worth of
- goods from the West.

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3654 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
THURSDAY, APRIL 30
Day Calendar
Conference on History--Registration,
Michigan Union, 8:15 a.m.
Landscape Design study Course 3,
Series II-Mich. Union, 8:30 a.m.
Mich. Scholars in College Teaching
Conference - Registration, Rackham
Bldg., 9:30 a.rn.
Mental Health Research Institute
Seminar-John R. Platt, Prof. of Phys-
ics, Univ. of Chicago, "How We See
Straight Lines": Main Conference Room,
Mental Health Research Institute, 2:15
p.m.
Law School Dinner-Honoring 50th
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, April 30, 7:30 p.n.,
Room 528D, SAB.
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Mid-week worship, April
30, 12:10-12:40 p.m., Douglas Memorial
Chapel.
Inter-Cooperative Council, Co-op
housing applications for the summer
session are now being accepted. Ap-
ply Room 2546 SAB or phone 668-6872,
9-12 or 2-5.
Le Cercle Francais: Le Haratin, le 30
Avril, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Dis-
cussion hour, May 1, 7:30 p.m., Mich-
igan Union (3rd Floor).
* * *
Physical Therapy Club, Informal cof-
fee to discuss coming year's events,
April 30, 7:30 p.m., University Hospi-
tal Lobby.;

Anniversary of Founding of American
Judicature Society: Mich. Union, 6:30.
p.m.
Regional Fire Training School-Civil
Defense and Disaster Training Center,
7 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Visconti's "Rocco and
His Brothers" (one performance only):
Architecture Aud., 7 p.m.
May Festival-The Philadelphia Or-
chestra, Eugene Ormandy, conductor;
Joan Sutherland, soprano: Hill Aud.,
8:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar-E. Ro-
gak, Dept. of Mith, will speak on topic
to be announced, Room 246 W. Engrg.,
4 p.m.
Biological Chem. Colloquium - Dr.
Howard Gest, Comnittee on Molecular
Biology, Washington Univ., St. Louis,'
Mo., "Formatidn of Molecular Hydro-
gen by Microorganisms; Significance for
Regulation of Anaerobic Energy Metab-
oiism": 7:45 pam. In M7412 Med. Sci-
ence Bldg.
Chemistry Colloquia-Michael Sprit-
zer, "Polarography ofthe Pyridinium
Ion," and Lee Traynor, 'tAldol Con-
densation of Deoxybenzoin with p-ni-
thobenzaldehyde": Room 1300 at 8
p.m. Chemistry Bldg.
Univ. Lecture-Dr. Sigfrid J. Schneid-
er, Inst. of Landeskunde, Bad Godes-
berg, West Germany, "Land Use and
Planning in Central Europe": at 4 p.m.
in 1040 Natural Resources Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for Tiong Suy
Yu, Electrical Engrg.; thesis: "Ferro-
electric Tape Recording and Reproduc-
ing Processes," 166 Frieze Bldg., at 12
noon. Chairman, G. E. Peterson.
Doctoral Examination for Mary Eve-
lyn Durden Teal, Music; thesis: "Mu-
sical Activities in Detroit from 1701
through 1870," 106 Lane Hall, at 2
p.m. Chairman, A. P. Britton.
Doctoral Examination for Russell Nor-
man Campbell, Linguistics; thesis:
"Noun Substitutes in Modern Thai,"

2219 Angell Hall, at 3:45 p.m. Chairman,
W. J. Gedney.
Doctoral Examination for Paul Byron
Hays, Aeronautical & Astronautical En-
grg.; thesis: "A Study of Some Prob-
lems in the Kinetic Theory of Rarefied
Gasas in an External Force Field," 1072
E. Engrg. Bldg., at 1 p.m. Chairman,
V. C. Liu.
Doctoral Examination for Tiong Suy
Yu, Electrical Engrg.; thesis: "Ferro-
electric Tape Recording and Reproduc-
ing Processes," 166 Frieze Bldg., at ,3
p.m. Chairman, G. E. Peterson.
General Noties,
Parking Notice: Effective immediate-
ly, Lots W-4 and W-8 in the 400
block of Thompson St. will' be closed
permanently for construction pur-
poses.
Parking facilities, for students using
this lot, are available at the U. of M.
Coliseum.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center Who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs- Clifford R. Miller, Ext. 3358, Inter-
national Center.
Vanraj Bhatia, Music Dept., Univ. of
Delhi, India, April 26-30.
Anwarul Islam, Lecturer in History,
Pakistan, April 28-May 3.
Cwan Sik Ko, Lecturer in Interna-
tional Law, Univ. of Indonesia, Diar-
karta, Indonesia, April 27-30.
Srdjan Vrcan (accompanied by Mrs.
Vrcan), Asst. Prof., Faculty of Law, Uni-
versity of Split, Split, Yugoslavia, April
27-May 10.
V. Raghavan, Prof. of Sanskrit, Chair-
man of the Dept. of Sanskrit, Madras
Univ., Madras, India, April 30-May 3.'
A. A. Gutmann, . Technical Recruit-
ment Representative, Compania Shell
de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, May
3-5.

Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau
of Appnintments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3544 for appoint-
ments with the following:
MAY 7 & 8-
U.S. Coast Guard Washington, D.C,-
Men, U.S. citizens only. Men who are
interested in Officer Candidate Sch.
Degree in any major field of study.
Students may apply during sr. year.
Will train for general duty officers. You
are invited to call for an appt. should
you be interested.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.,
_ Dallas, Texas-Seeking College Repre-
sentatives to sell an insurance prog. to
the college seniors & graduates, Loca-
tion: Ann Arbor. College degree pref.
Successful employment pref. Age 21-
31. Male.
Swift & Co., Chicago, II,- Many &
various openings including: Adv., In-
dust. Sales, Econ. Res, for Agri. Chemi-
cals,.Beginning Programmer, Mktg. An-
alyst. Systems & Procedures -Trainee,
Chemists, Project Engrir., etc.
Congregation B'nai Emunah, Skokie,
I1.-Seeking Youth Director- or Ad-
visor. Responsible for discussing, plan-
ning & implementing prog. activities
for youth groups, ages 10-17 yrs. Will
supv. advisors & teen leaders. Will con-
sider a person on either full-time or
part-time basis. Male or female grad
student. Exper. in group technique work
& religious Hebrew schooling Judaica.
U.S. Naval Air Station, Alameda,
Calif.-Openings for Industrial Engi-
neers. Prefer students graduating in
June '64 or recently graduated engi-
neers. A diversified prog. offering ex-
ceptional oppor. for the Indiist. Engnr.
Tyco Laboratories, Inc., Waltham,
Mass; - Openings for personnel who
majored in Physics, Chem., Metallurgy
or EE who have following qualifica-
tions: 1) applied res-oriented scientist
with at least 5 yrs. exper. in design &
dev. of adv. semiconductor devices. 2)
research-oriented vmaterials scientist

f

BOX or HANGER
'STORAGE
Leave your winter gar-
ments in storage. We
will return them next

PICK UP YOUR

MICHIGAN ENSIAN
[ODAY - FRIDAY

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1000 t 2000 WORDS A.MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
YOU CAN READ 150-200 PAGES AN HOUR using the ACCELERATED READING
method. You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000
words a minute. And retention is excellent. Many students comprehend at over 2,000 words
a minute. This is not a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATE READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial, as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
No machines or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READING method.
In this way the reader avoids developing rany dependence upon external equipment in
reading rapidly.
A SUMMER CLASS in ACCELERATED READING will be held in Ann Arbor near the
U of M campus on Tuesday evenings beginning on June 23. It's very advantageous to be able
to read a book in one sitting and see it as a whole.
Be dur guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
rnethod on THURSDAY, April 30 at 7:30 P.M. and on WEDNESDAY, May 6 at 7:30 P.M.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the MICHIGAN STUDENT UNION. (Check bulletin
board for room location.)
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING, Inc.

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at
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PO ETRY READING
Sponsored by Generation Magazine
TRIM BISSELL and
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FRIDAY, MAY 1,8 P.M.
At the Wesley Foundation
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