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April 30, 1964 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1964

fympie Swimming Future
ooks Good for Americans

IN OLYMPIC GAMES:

I, -,

M'Moves into Title Race

U.S. Should Rule Track Meet

(4,i

NEW YORK (M)--Don't worry
about the Russians, Americans
again will dominate the swimming
pool in the 1964 Olympic Games
at Tokyo, a leading U.S. swim-
ming authority promised earlier
this week.
"The Russians are coming fast
and they will be good in certain
discipline events, such as the
breaststroke and backstroke," said
Max Ritter of Jenkintown, Pa.
"But they will be hard-pressed to
win a single medal. We should
win plenty."
Ritter is president of the Inter-
national Swimming Federation, or
the FINA, and treasurer of the
U.S. Olympic Committee. He is
regarded as one of the world's
most knowledgeable men in the
water sport.
Russians Hold Marks
His appraisal eased some of the.
alarm felt in some U.S. swim-'
ming circles when the latest list
of recognized world records cred-
ited the Russians with four of
the 10 made since the first of the
year. Only one American was in-
cluded-individual medley special-
ist Donna de Varona of Santa
Clara, Calif.
The Russians never have won an
Olympic swimming title although
they are strong in most other
Olympic events.
A Russian breaststroker, Geor-
gi Propopenko, was credited with
SCORES
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Bowling Green 3, Ohio State 2
Indiana Central 6, Miami (Ohio) 1
Georgia tech 4, Tennessee 3

world records in the 100 and 220
meters and the medley relay.
"I know Propopenko - he is
one of the Soviet's best swim-
mers," Ritter said, "but we should
not take too much stock in his
records. One was made at Baku,
the other at Blackpool in Eng-
land.
Salt Water Advantage
"Both are salt water pools.
Swimmers have more buoyancy in
salt water and their times are
faster. Some of us have been try-
ing to get salt water perform-
ances eliminated.
"If the Americans swam in salt
water, they would murder the rec-
ords."
The swimming authority said
the American team, made up
largely of teen-agers of 14 and 15
years, should be the strongest ever
sent to the Games and should
improve on the 1960 record at
Rome. There, American men won
six of the 10 championships, four
silver medals and three bronze.
The women won five of the nine
titles and had three seconds.
Start Swimmers Young
"Recently our swimmers broke
almost exery existing American
record," Ritter said. "Our program
is almost unbeatable. We start
our swimmers at six years old. By
the time they're 14, or 15 they've
reached a peak.
"Our strength will lie in our
depth. We have swimmers - great
swimmers - nobody has ever
heard of. Our established kids will
have trouble winning places on the
team-the boys and girls coming
up are so strong.
"The Russians, who are proud
and who work hard, are im-
proving, but we're too far ahead."

COLUMBUS, Ohio (P) - Al-
though the challengers are creep-z
ing up, the United States should
win handily in the track-field
phase of the 1964 Olympic Games
in Tokyo.
So said Larry Snyder, Ohio
State's silver-haired coach, who
tutored the American cinder con-
tingent to victory in the 1960
games at Rome, as he talked ear-
lier in the week on track topics.
"We've never been beaten in
track and field," Snyder said, "and
I'm sure we can stay in front
for some time. Other nations are
getting better, mostly as a result'
of learning our training and tech-
niques.
"Scores of foreign athletes are

attending American colleges and
will compete for their home lands
in the Olympics. Some of them
are certain medal winners, and
they got their know-how here.
Clinics by our coaches in foreign
countries have helped the other
nations, too."
"But the U.S. is filled with tal-
ent in the sprints and hurdles and
some of the field events, and
should win handily," Snyder said.
Snyder also predicted that the
relatively new U.S. Track and
Field Federation would replace the
Amateur Athletic Union in the not
too distant future as this coun-
try's ruling organization in inter-
national athletics.

"The Federation has 670,901
athletes and 27,353 coaches un-
der its control in the high schools
and colleges," Snyder said. "It al-
so has indoor and outdoor track
facilities valued at $178.6 million
and its members spend $31 mil-
lion annually on equipment and
travel
"The AAU doesn't have a single
track or coach. It just has con-
trol."
A probable three-medal U.S.
sweep in the 110- and 440-meter
hurdles, shot and discus at Tokyo
was envisioned by Snyder, but he
sees little hope for American
points in the hammer, javelin,
triple jump, steeplechase, mara-
thon or walking events.
He tagged Bob Hayes of Florida
A & M, Adolph Plummer and
Ulis Williams of Arizona State,
Willie May of Indiana, Henry Carr
of Detroit, Hayes Jones of Eastern
Michigan, Rex Cawley of South-
ern California and Elzie Higgen-
bottom of Wisconsin as the big
hopes in the shorter events.
Tom O'Hara of Chicago Loyola
was picked as the No. 1 threat at
1500 meters, and Snyder said Bob
Schule of Miami (Ohio) Univer-
sity, could be well up in the 5000
or 10,000-meter runs where the
United States usually is blanked.

By JIM LASOVAGE
After a disappointing non-con-
ference season record, the Wolver-
ine diamondmen opened the Big
Ten season with three consecu-
tive victories last weekend.
Now, with a 3-0 conference rec-
ord, the Wolverines are tied for
the Big Ten lead with Purdue.
After dropping Notre Dame 2-0
in the first game of a four-game
road series, Michigan went on to
shut out Wisconsin 6-0 in the Big
Ten opener, and followed this with
a double victory over Northwest-
ern, 7-1, 8-1. The Blue then lost
a 9-3 decision to the same Notre
Dame team on Tuesday.
Get Good Pitching
On the road trip, Michigan re-
ceived four fine pitching perform-
ances from four different pitch-
ers, Bill Wahl, Marlin PembEcon,
Clyde Barnhart, and Paul Schuldt
each went the distance, as Mich-
igan's opponents gathered a total
of two runs on 17 hits in four
games.
The Wolverine nine did not fare
so well in Tuesday's rematch with
Notre Dame, as the Irish dropped
Michigan 9-3. Shortstop Rich
Gronski of Notre Dame was the
big gun in killing the home town
favorites with four hits, four runs,
and four '-uns batted in. Two of
his safeties were round-trippers.
The pitching did not hold up, as

P.

Coach Moby Benedict was able to
get only two innings from starter
Carl Welch. He was blasted for
five runs on six hits before he
retired his six batters. Jim Bobel
followed him on the mound, and
fared somewhat better, lasting five
frames. He left the game in favor
of pinch hitter Al Bara, who sin-
gled for him in the seventh inning.
The Irish managed to tag Bobel
for three runs on three hits.

Wayne Slusher came in to
throw the last two innings for
Michigan. He allowed only one
hit, but that was a home run by
Gronski for Notre Dame's last run.
Benedict commented that the
hitters didn't come through in
the clutch, and this can be seen
by the fact that Michigan left
nine men stranded on the base
paths.
In the Big Ten this year, ac-
cording to the coaches, Just about
anybody could win. The best
chances were given to Indiana,
P u r d u e, Minnesota, Michigan
State and Ohio State, the teams
which piled up the best spring
records.
Purdue 'Wins
However, Minnesota lost to
Purdue in the Big Ten opener,
Ohio State and Indiana split a
doubleheader, and Michigan State
divided a twin bill with Wiscon-
sin. This left only Michigan and
Purdue with unmarred conference
marks.
The schedule for Friday has
Purdue at Michigan at Ferry Field
at 3:30 p.m. Other games are
Illinois at Michigan State, Iowa
at Minnesota, Northwestern at
Ohio State, and Wisconsin at In-
diana.
Big Ten Doubleheaders
On Saturday, Big Ten action
will be at its fullest, with five
doubleheaders on tap. Illinois will
be the guest of Michigan. The
first game will start at 1:30 p.m.
at Ferry Field.
Other Big Ten pairings for Sat-
urday are: Iowa at Minnesota,
Northwestern- at .Indiana, Purdue
at Michigan State, and Wisconsin
at Ohio State.
Following are the Michigan in-
dividual statistics and team totals
complete .through Tuesday's loss.
Tate Leads..
BATTING

RON TATE

SPORTS SHORTS:
Urges RacingFanis To Politic

BOB HAYES

TOM O'HARA

I I

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Cleveland 5 3 .625 -
Minnesota 7 5 .583 -
Detroit 7 5 .583 -
Chicago 5 4 .556 3j
Baltimore 6 5 .545 r.z
New York 4 4 .500 1
x-Washington 6 7 .462 1
Boston 5 7 .417 2
x-LosAngeles 5 7 .417 2
Kansas City 3 6 .333 2Y2
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 4, Boston 2
Detroit 5, Kansas City 4 (10 inn)
Chicago at New York (rain)
Clevelandat Minnesota (wet)
Los Angeles 5, Washington 0 (4 inn)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at New York
Detroit at Kansas City
Cleveland at Minnesota
Only games scheduled,

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Houston
Los Angeles
Chicago
New York
YESTERI

W L Pct.
8 2 .800
8 3 .727
8 5 .615
8 6 .571
7 6 .538
6 6 .500
6 9 .400
6 9 .400
4 7 .364
2 10 .167
RESULTS

GB
1/
2
2%
3
4f
4Y2
4Y
7

DAY'S

San Francisco 4, Chicago 0
Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0
Los Angeles 7, Houston 2
St. Louis 4, New York 3 (11 inn)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Chicago
Los Angeies at Houston (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
New York at St. Louis (n)

By The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A horse
racing official suggested last night
racing fans could become a force
to give the sport a better break
in the political arena.
"The answer to racing's politi-
cal problems is for racing to be-
come politically important itself,"
Neil J. Curry told a National Turf
Writers Association dinner.
Curry, president of the National
Association of State Racing Com-
missioners, said racing feared en-
tering politics because officials feel
there aren't enough votes among
those actively engaged in the sport
to make any difference in any
election.
He also said that if track of-.
ficials support partisan politicians
and they lose, those in racing feel
they would be punished by the
winners.
Racing has a far more potent
politicalweapon, he told the writ-
ers.
"Our political resources are the
millions of Americans who love
the sport, who get to tracks when-
ever they can and who avidly read
the magic words coming from your
typewriters-the racing public,"
he said.
MIDAS MEANS IT!1

Those wno would tax racing to
extinction could be made to feel
the power at the polls of the army
of racing fans."
VMI Coach Resigns
LEXINGTON, Va. Louis F.
(Weenie) Miller, Virginia, Military;
Institute's basketball coach who
guided the Keydets to their first
Southern Conference crown in his-
tory the past season, will resign at
the end of the academic year.
Maj. Gen. George R. E. Shell,
VMI superintendent, announced
Miller's resignation yesterday and
said Gary D. McPherson would
move up -from assistant to head
coach.
Miller, a native of Richmond,
has been VMI's head basketball
coach for six years. He resigned
to enter private business.
A native of Richmond and a
1947 graduate of the University of
Richmond, Miller was head bask-
etball coach at Hampden-Sydney
and at neighboring Washington
and Lee before taking over at
VMI in 1958.
His record at VMI was 41-84
and in winning the conference
championship the past season he
chalked up a 12-12 record, the
Keydets' first non-losing season
since 1941

Williams, NCAA and National
AAU 440-yard dash champion, has
been hampered by leg injuries all
season. He suffered a new injury
last weekend at the Drake Re-
lays.
ASU trainer Art Dickinson said
the new injury appears far more
serious than first believed. He
said the injury is to the long mus-
cle at the fraont of Williams'
right thigh.
* *
Fail To Cash Tickets
ALBANY, N.Y. - Race track
patrons in New York state failed
to cash $497,554 in winning pari-
mutuel tickets last year, the State
Tax Department reported yester-
day.
When the tickets were not re-
deemed by April 1, the tracks
turned over the money to the de-
partment and it went into the
state's general fund.
The department said the total
was $65,954 more than the 1962
racing season.
* * *
Long Recovers
LOS ANGELES - Shot-putter
Dallas Long learned last night
that an injury suffered when 200
pounds of weights, fell on his
foot will not prevent him from
defending his world record.

Tate, of
Sizemore, c-of
Gilhooley, of-2b
Simonds, lb
Meyers, of
Laslo, 2b
Bara, of
Skaff, 3bj
Campbell, ss
Adams, c
DiNunzio, of

18'
20
20.
19
18
13;
20
20
9
,1

70
74
69
61
66
31
65
70
19
1

15
9
5
11
12
4
10
15
2
1.

G AB R H RBIPct.
17 50 6 16 11 .320

20
19
17
15
15
7
14
15
2
0

PITCHERS' BATTING

Dunston
Slusher
Pemberton
Bobel
Barnhart
Wahl
Schuldt
Welch
Totals
Opponents

3 6
5 4
5 5
7 13
5 12
5 6
4 6
3 5

2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.

2
1
0
0
0

o0
0
0
0
0

.333
.250
.200
.154
.000
.000
.00
.23 0
426w

"If they are given the story, it Williams Out for Season
seems to me that every political TEMPE, Ariz. - Arizona State
figure who favors a sound policy quartermiler Ulis Williams may
on racing can count on important be cut for the rest of the collegi-
backing in his contests. ate season with a leg inju-y.

4 .286
5 .256
12 .246
12 .246
7 .227
7 .225
6 .215
6 .214
4 .105
0 .000

20 633 93 146 75
Totals 20 623 98 168 85

}Sr FC 'C.} ,rer"+,r :.rrti , ; vYr .". vc +e ...,} } ijr .Y" r'"':'R .
r,.. b: sti h 'lfs'iA'i' ' {' 1.. {.':. Y.tt"} 1:1M .'H.:lr. sa" u' i:+?'. " .; . 6

CHECK IN
ALI.
- .
nd
See a FRESH

4 t
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§ Button-Down with Trim Tapered Body, It Makes a
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NO 5-7228 WO 2-1605

PITCHING TOTALS
G W L IP H ERA
Wahl 5 2 0 25% 16 1.07
Schuldt 5 2 0 18y3 9 1.96
Pemberton 5 1 0 16% 22 2.16
Barnhart 5 2 3 36 36% 2.21
Dunston 3 2 0 14 15 5.79
Bobel 4 0 3 24/3 29 5.87
Slusher 4 0 2 11 17 9.82
Welch 3 0 3 14 24 11.57
Totals 20 9 11 160 168 4.20
Opponents 20 11 9 166% 146 3.36

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