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April 29, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGANDAILY

PAGE SIX TIH~ MJCHIE~AN DAILY

'" r"INLIOIAI., fir,

Irish Blast Wolverine Nine, 9-3

By GIL SAMBERG
And the rains came . . . but
about an hour too late.
Even before the drops came the
Wolverines were swamped, how-
ever, as Notre Dame took an easy
9-3 decision here yesterday.
The Irish severed a four game
Michigan winning streak and put
its season's record at 9-11.
Starter Carl Welch's ERA be-
gan to soar soon after he came
to the mound. Almost immediate-
ly came a single file procession of
Irish baserunners, starting with
two singles up the middle, a sacri-
fice bunt, and a wild pitch. Then
followed a single to deep short, a
solid double between Earl Meyers
and Ron Tate in left and center,
and a line single into left. Fin-
ally a double play squelched the
fire. In the end there were four
runs and five hits on the score-
board.
When sophomore Welch finally
left the game in the third he was
responsible for five runs and six,
hits, although his curves broke
sharply.
Bobel Comes In
Reliever Jim Bobel worked the
next five innings and allowed three.,

runs, all in the seventh. After
Irish pitcher Frank Karazim sin-
gled, and second baseman Al Kris-
towski walked, Rich Goni'ki clout-
ed a 355-foot opposite field home
run just out of right fielder Bob
Gilhooley's reach.
Gonski, the Notre Dame short-
stop who hit .358 last year, add-
ed the winner's only other run
in the ninth on another homer,
this time to straightaway left. He
finished the game with four RBI's,
four runs scored, and four hits.
Although they were drubbed,
the. Wolverines almost came up
with the defensive play of the
game. With Gonski up in the
seventh (just before he hit his
first four bagger) catcher Ted
Sizemore caught Irish pitcher Kar-
azim just a little too far off of
second base and. made a quick
but h'w throw-down. Base umpire
Jack Solomon, in trying to steer
clear of the ball, ducked right
into it and became part of the
play, almost getting an assist, as
second baseman Tom Laslo nearly
made the putout when the ball
caromed off of the man in blue's
back.
Weak Offense
As for the Michigan nine, they
were blanked on all offensive de-
partments by the strong pitching
of Karazim until the seventh in-
ning. Then his shut-out, no-hit-
ter was broken as Earl Meyers
slammed a liner to third which
Tom Blythe knocked down but
could not complete the play on.
Then sophomore Chard Simonds
slashed a solid triple down the
right field line. George Skaff fol-
lowed with a sacrifice fly to left,
which was slightly misjudged and
almost dropped by John Musto,
nd Simonds crossed the plate for
the second tally.
When Tom Laslo lined a single
solidly up the middle and Al
Bara, batting for Bobel, dropped
in a Texas leaguer, Notre Dame
Coach Jake Clyne, gave reliever
Levin O'Neill the nod and Kara-
zim went in for a shower.
Long Out
Bob Gilhooley greeted the right
hander with a long fly which the

Irish left fielder caught about 15
feet from the fence. Third base-
man Blythe ended the threat by
turning an apparent base hit into
a force out at the hot corner.
Michigan scored again in the
ninth when Laslo singled again,
this time between third and short.
After Pete Adams struck out bat-
ting for Wayne Slusher, who had
relieved in the eighth, Bob Gil-
hooley lined a single. Ted Size-
more sent Laslo home on a dou-
ble to left center, but the game
ended when Dave Campbell bounc-
ed out, short to first.
The combined Michigan pitch-
ing for the game chalked up eight
strikeouts while allowing only
three walks. Notre Dame hurlers
struck out four and walked three.
All of the runs scored wero earn-
ed
The key to yesterday's loss was
weak pitching. Welch was bombed
from the start. Bobel was effec-
tive for all but one inning in
which he too was shellacked.
Slusher gave up one hit during
his two inning stint, but it was
a home run. Moby Benedict's com-'
ment; on his pitching was brief
and to the point. "Some days you
leased yesterday showed a net
get it and some days you don't."

Irish Eyes Smile
MICHIGAN AB R H RBI
Giihooley if 5 0 1 0
Sizemore c 5 0 1 1
Campbell ss 4 0 0 0
Tateof 3 0 1 0
Meyers If 3 1 1 0
Simonds lb 3 1 1 1
Skaffab 2 0 0 1
Laslo 2b 4 1 2 0
Welch p 0 0 0 0
Bobe p 2 00 0
a-Bata 1 0 1 0
Siusher p 0 0 0 0
b-Adams 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 8 3
NOTRE DAME AB R H RBI
Kristowski 2b 4 2 1 0
Gonski ss 5 4 4 4
Counseilrf 3 0 0 0
Fitzmaurice cf 4 1 1 2
Blythe 3b 4 1 1 0
Schrader lb. 4 0 1 2
Musto if 4 0 1 0
Sauget c 3 0 0 0
Karazim p 3 1 1 0
O'Neill p 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 9 10 8
a-Singled for Bobel in 7th.
b-Struck out for Slusher in 9th.
NOTRE DAME 401 000 301-9
MICHIGAN 000 000 201-3
E-Simonds. LOB-Notre Dame 3,
Michigan 9. SAC-Counsell. HR -
Gonski 2, 2B-Blythe. SAC-Skaff.
3B-Simonds. 2B-Sizemore. DP -
Laslo - Campbell - Simonds, Meyers-
Sizemore-Skaff.
PITCHING SUMMARIES
IP R H ER BB SO
Karazim 6Y324 3 32
O'Neill 21/3~ 1 4. 1 0 2
Welch 2 5 6 5 0 1
Bobel 5 3 3 3 3 5
Slusher 2 1 1 1 0 2

-Daily-Michael Sattinger -Daily--Frank W
THE SAB BASEMENT stands empty while students and floats are CONFUSED FRUGUE OGLERS combined with gravity yield
rushed off to the Michigras parade. a flattened tire.

Battered Ballplayers
Nurse Injured Bodies

NEW YORK (AP) - The bad
humor man is frowning on the
baseball stars. A collection of ills
ranging from creaking arms, sore
leg muscles and aching backs to
ulcers is making life miserable for
the athletes.
Add up the salaries of the play-
ers on the sidelines and it ap-
proaches $750,000.
Sandy Koufax is the big one, of
course. The Los Angeles Dodgers'
World Series ace has a strained
muscle in his left forearm. No-
body is sure just when he will be
able to resume earning his $70,000
salary. He is doing a little running

JIM BOBEL

Soviets Jeopardize
U.S. Cage Monopoiy

MOSCOW (p)-Is U.S. Olympic
basketball supremacy threatened
at last?
It could be. An American squad
with five members of the 1964
Olympic team lost three straight
to the Soviet national team here,
despite some fine college players,
seven men over 6-6 and four
teammates - from the AAU cham-
pionship club.
"We should have risen to the
challenge here-there's. no alibi,"
said Cliff Buck of the AAU, head
of the team.
He said his team "hasn't played
good ball." And he said the Rus-
sians are much better than they
were three years ago when an
American team won eight straight.
But, he said, "I feel we can win
the championship at the Tokyo
Olympics." He said the Americans
will have a stronger team at Tok-
yo, with more depth and more
experience of playing together.
Lack Teamwork
Buck said in a telephone inter-
view from Kiev that one of the
problems has been that the U.S.
team has not.played together long
enough.

However, four of the 12 men on
the U.S. squad are teammates on
the Akron, Ohio, club that won
the AAU championship this year.
They are Larry Brown, 5-10,
Dick Davies, 6-1, Pete McCaffrey,
6-7, and Lloyd Sharrar, 6-10.
Davies and Sharrar are 28.
Brown, Davies and McCaffrey
are members of the 1964 Olmypic
team.
Jerry Shipp of Bartlesville,
Okla., also 28 and 6-6, and Jim
Barnes, 23 and 6-8, are the other
two Olympic team members on
the club.
The Soviet national team whip-
ped the Americans 82=65, 79-60
and 62-59. The Americans beat a
Leningrad local team Sunday, 74-
65 for their first win in Russia.
Yesterday a Lativan team topped
the U.S. squad 75-61.
Buck said his team was in a
slump after the long basketball
season at home.
Suffer Letdown
"There was a letdown for these
boys after they had reached their
peak for the Olympic trials,"
which ended April 4, he said.

Mickey pulled a left hamstring
muscle in Sunday's game with
Baltimore. He expects to be back
in action today.
Roger Maris, who gets $62,000
a year, also has a pulled muscle
that will keep him out of the
Yankee line-up for another week
and Tony Kubek, the regular
shortstop, hasn't played this sea-
son because of a bad back.
More Aches and Pains
Two Yankee pitchers, Ralph
and Bill Stafford, have not ap-
peared in a game either. Terry
has a sore back and Stafford a
tight right shoulder.
Orlando Cepeda's mysterious
right knee ailment will keep him
out of the San Francisco Giants'
batting order for two more weeks.
After flying to New York for ex-
amination, the first baseman is
returning to San Francisco for
treatment while the Giants are on
the road.
Pete Ward's chronic back ache
has been a severe blow to the Chi-
cago White Sox, who miss his bat.
Rains Steal
Possible Win
In Tennis
Michigan's tennis match yester-
day with Notre Dame in South
Bend, Ind., was rained out.
At the time that the matches
were called the Wolverines were
winning all of the singles matches.
Playing in the singles matches
were Harry Fauquier, Karl Hed-
rick, Hal Lowe, Brian Flood, Bill
Dixon and Jim Swift.
At present there are no plans to
reschedule the match at a later
date because of the crowded sched-
ules of both teams.
The meet was to be the Wol-
verines fourth outdoor match since
their southern swing during spring
vacation. They stand 3-3 for the
season.
The Wolverines will journey to
Evanston for a quadrangular meet
with the Northwestern Wildcats,
Minnesota and Purdue this week-
end.

Michigras To Hibernate
Until 1966 Reappearance.

-Daily-Frank Wing -Daily-James Keson
Students line up.......to see, among other booths, the winning "This Was The World That Was."

JOHNNY PODRES
to be in shape when the doctor
gives the sign.
Johnny Podres of the Dodgers,
another member of the world
champs' Big Four, is out for two
weeks. He came up with a sore
elbow while pitching an exhibi-
tion and then was hit on the el-
bow by Warren Spahn Saturday
in Milwaukee.
And Perranoski Too
Ron Perranoski, the Dodgers'
late-inning stopper, is nursing a
sore leg muscle and Tommy Davis,
the 1962 and 1963 batting cham-
pion of the National League, has
a jammed shoulder as the result
of a dive to a base in Milwaukee.
The highest priced star on the
injured list is Mickey Mantle, the
$100,000-a-year New York Yankee.

. :;

i

I

I

Major League Standings

-I

AMERICAN LEAGUE
.W L Pct
Cleveland 5 3 .625
Minnesota 7 5 .588
Chicago 5 4 .556
Detroit 6 5 .545
x-Washington 6 6 .500
Baltimore 5 5 .500
New York 4 4 .500
Boston 5 6 .455
Kansas City 3 5 .375
x-Los Angeles 4 7 .364
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago at New York (rain)
Minnesota 9, Cleveland 8'
Boston 6, Baltimore 4
Washington at Los Angeles (me)
Kansas City 5, Detroit 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at New York
Baltimore at Boston
Cleveland at Minnesota
Washington at Los Angeles (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
-
1/
1
1
2
- /2

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Chicago
Los Angeles
New York

8
7
7
7
7
6
6
4
5
z

L
2
3
5
5
6
6
8
6
9
9

Pct.
.800
.700
.583
.583
.538
.500
.429
.400
.357
.182

GB
1
2
2
3
4
4
5
62

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco at Chicago (rain)
Los Angeles 3, Houston 1
Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 2
Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 5
St. Louis 8, New York 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Houston (n)
New York at St. Louis (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
San Francisco at Chicago
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)

-Daily-Frank Wing
AGGRESSIVE STUDENTS push aside previous tenants of the League
fountain to watch the Frugue contest.

-Daily-Jeffrey Bates
THE SYMBOL OF THIS year's Michigras was Michivision
with "Tubey."

'.

JUNE GRADUATES!
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Why Not Consider
IBM
ACCOUNTING MACHINE SALES

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