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April 28, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-28

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TUESDAY; APRIL 28, 1964

PAGE SI.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. ....'...:Y

RAGE SiX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1964 I

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
for next yr. as a Panel Member of Mad.
Mag., Campus Marketing Program. The
girl selected as panel member will be
sent portfolio containing 3-6 assign-
ments to complete-distributing samples

or conducting surveys-No selling. Use-
ful training for fashioning, marketing,
merchandising, soc., careers. Applica-
tions available at Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments.
3200 ,SAB, Ext. 3544.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
Camp Nahelu, Ortonville, Mich.-Mr.
Michaels will interview male & female
counselors on Wed., April 29 from 1 p.m.

,ยข

on for coed camp. Seeking sailing coun-
selors and riding counselor (man or
woman) and female archery counselor;
also a nurse.
ANNOUNCEMENT:
N.Y. State Division of Employment
seeking Employment Interviewers for
its professional staff, N.Y. City. Grad-
uating seniors or recent grads interested
in career in personnel, men or women,
please call Bureau of Appointments,
Ext. 3544 to sign up for Civil Service
Exam., to be held on campus.

'Slow Response' Causes
Golf Practice Revision

NBA Champions 'Best fEver'

00MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
YOU CAN READ 150-200 PAGES AN HDUR using the ACCELERATED READING
method. You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000
words a minute. And retention is excellent. 6Aany students comprehend at over 2,000 words
a minute. This is not a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You con apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial, as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
No machines or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READING method.
In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment in
reading rapidly.
A SUMMER CLASS in ACCELERATED READING will be held in Ann Arbor near the
U of M campus on Tuesday evenings beginning on June 23. It's very advantageous to be able
to read a book in one sitting and see it as a whole..
Be our, guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
method on THURSDAY, April 30 at 7:30 P.M. and on WEDNESDAY, May 6 at 7:30 P.M.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the MICHIGAN STUDENT UNION. (Check bulletin
board for room location.)
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING, Inc.

By BOB CARNEY
A break' in the Big Ten schedule,
this past weekend gave coach Bert
Katzenmeyer's golf squad a chance
to hold their annual intra-squad
tournament. The results?
"We've got a long way to go,"
said Katzenmeyer yesterday. "The
weather was nice, but it was a
rough day golf-wise."
In what was nearly a repeat of
last week's last-place finish at
Ohio State, junior Pete Passink
took first place with' scores of
77-76-74, followed by Gary M-ouw
and Bill Newton who were tied
for second and Frosty and Jim
Evashevski knotted at fourth
place.
"Pete did a fine job," said
Katzenmeyer, "but most of the
scores were too high to tell any-
thing."
Tom Clark, who3 led the Wol-
verine linksmen with 73 at Colum-
bus on the 17th, was described
as "wayback in the field" by
Katzenmeyer.
"The whole team has just been
hitting too many bad shots. We've
got good potential, but we're very
slow in responding this year."
Earlier in the season Katzen-
meyer cited putting as the team's
major weakness. Yesterday he had
no particulars.

"What's one man's weakness is
another's strength. As far as put-
ting goes, we've been sporadic.
As a team, we need work in all
departments."
The fact that the present prob-
lems have affected the whole
team are shown in Katzenmeyer's
decision to leave the line-up as is.
"No, I won't make any line-up
changes," he said, "but our prac-
tice routine will be changed con-
siderably. I expect to increase the
intensity of the present setup, and
make it more regular. That means
more time on the 'practice tee and
less on the course."
Katzenmeyer's n e w methods
will get their first test this week-
end when the Wolverines travel
to Lansing for a pentangular
meet. Also in the meet will be
North western, Wisconsin, Indiana
and Michigan State.
Extend Series .Pay
NEW YORK P-) - The major
league baseball players have voted
by an overwhelming 478-58 margin
to cut in the fifth-place teams
on the World Series' player pool.
Previously only the first four
teams had shared the Series cash.

BOSTON (P) - Now that the<
Boston Celtics have won an un-
precedented sixth straight Na-
t i o n a l Basketball Association
championship, what do they do
for an encore?
Easy, says owner Walter Brown.
Make it seven in a row.
The wonder of the 1964 Celtics
is that they turned supposed
weaknesses-loss of Bob Cousy
old age-into strengths.
The Celtics made history Sun-
day night by defeating San Fran-
cisco 105-99 and wrapping up the
final series. Never before had a
professional team won more than
five consecutive playoff titles.
Wilt Chamberlain dominated
the individual columns, as he had
during the regular season. Cham-
berlain led in total points, 416,
per-game average, 34.7, field goal
percentage, .543, and rebounds,
502 throughout the playoffs.
Sam Jones topped Boston scor-
ers with' a 23.2 average.
"I think this is the best team
we've ever had," Brown said Mon-
day.
"The thing that tickles me is
that everyone said we wouldn't be
nearly as good without Cousy
and then we wind up with a bet-
ter team.
"Now with Frank Ramsey and
Jim Loscutoff retiring, they'll
probably say the same thing next
year. But I think our club will be
just as good.

f
,,.

0I

i,

SAM JONES WILT CHAMBERLAIN

"Don't forget that I'm the guy
who never wanted to see Cousy
grow old, and I still wish he nev-
er did. Even if Ramsey couldn't
play, you'd still want him around
your team for his spirit. And while
people thought we were crazy
drafting Loscutoff No. 1 out of col-
lege, we never regretted it."
Other Celtics undecided about

507 Fifth Avenue

New York 17, N.Y.

1

He's Sitting Pretty
Because He Signed Up To
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Next Fa ll
MAKE 25 Cents
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CALL JUDY-'
at 2-3241 X 32
SIGN UP NOW!.

This Week in Sports

TODAY
BASEBALL-Notre Dame at Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
TENNIS-Michigan at Notre Dame, South Bend, Ind.
FRIDAY /
BASEBALL-Purdue at Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
TENNIS-Quadrangular meet: Michigan, Minnesota, Purdue
and Northwestern at Evanston
SATURDAY

SWIMMING FEDERATION:
World Marks Approved;
Nine Nations Suspended

their playing futures are Clyde
Lovollette, Willie Naulls and John-
ny McCarthy.
The Boston team, whose 8-2
blitz through Cincinnati and the
Warriors was its fastest playoff
spurt since 1961, isbasically the
"seven old men of basketball" plus
Johnny Havlicek, the backcourt
spark plug wise beyond his years.
"This team has the most guts
of any," Tommy Heinsohn said.
"In fact, not having Cousy may
have been our biggest asset. His
retirement gave us added incen-
tive to meet the extra challenges.
"We weren't as explosive as
some of our past teams. But we
played better defense. And that
took a lot of desire.
"And the fact we are old pros
helped tremendously. We have
played together so long every-
body knows instinctively what his
teammate is going to do. This is
essential to good defense."
Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

BASEBALL-Illinois at Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
TENNIS-Conclusion of quadrangular meet at Evanston
TRACK-Michigan at Penn State, State College, Pa.
GOLF-Michigan, Northwestern, Wisconsin, Indiana
Michigan State at Lansing
FOOTBALL-Scrimmage at Ferry Field, 2:00 p.m.

TOKYO (/)-The International
Swimming Federationapprove&
10 world records, including one
by Donna de Varona of Santa
Clara, Calif., yesterday and bar-
red 45 swimmers of nine coun-
tries from the 1964 Olympic Games
at Tokyo.
The suspensions were based on
mers who competed in the Gamer,
of the New Emerging Forces at
Jakarta last November. None was

and

regardedras a serious Olympic
contender.
The 10 world records, five by
men and five by women, involved
performances made since the first
.f this year.
Miss De Varona, wno was 17
on Monday, was given official
'redit for her 5:16.5 clocking in
the 400-meter women's individual
medley, the best ever.
She was the only American in-
cluded in the latest list of world
record smashers. Five Russians,
four Britons and three Australians
had marks recognized, including
two relay events.
Australia's Dawn Fraser re-
ceived official sanction for her
remarkable 58.9 seconds in the
100 meters freestyle at Sydney
last Feb. 29. Two other Austral-
ians-Ian O'Brien, a breaststrok-
er, and Kevin Berry, a butterfly
specialist. also were included.
O'Brien swam the 110 ."ards
)reaststroke in 1:08.5, Berry did
the 200 meters butterly in 2:06.9.
Georgiv Propopenko of the So-
viet Union figured in three of the
world records. They included the
100 meters breaststroke, which he
did in 1:07.4; the 220 yards breast-
stroke, 2:31.4, and a part in the
44-yard medley relay.
The suspensions involved swim-
ed by Kotaro Abe, honorary sec-
retary of the international fed-
eration.
The banned swimmers, whose
suspensions are for one year, in-
clude 12 Japanese, eight Argen-
tines, one Bulgarian, seven Cam-
bodians, four Dutchmen, one Mex-
ican, one Dominican, two Sicilians
and nine from the United Arab
Republic.

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Houston
Chicago
Los Angeles
New York

W
7
7
7
6
6
6
6
4
2

L
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
6
9
8

Pct.
.778
.700
.636
.545
.545
.500
.462
.400
.308
.200

YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles 6, Houston 0
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Chicago
Los Angeles at Houston (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
New York at St. Louis (n)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Cleveland 5 2 .714
Detroit 6 4 .600
Baltimore 5 4 .556
Chicago 5 4 .556
Minnesota 6 5 .545
New York 4 4 .500
Washington 6 6 .500
Boston 4 6 .400
Los Angeles 4 7 .364
Kansas City 2 5 .286
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 6, Los Angeles 3
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Minnesota
Chicago at New York
Baltimore at Boston
Washington at Los Angeles (a)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)

GB
--
1 Y
2
2
21/
3-
5
GB
I
1
1
13/;
21/
3
3

1

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I

11

FINAL SABBATH SERVICE
OF SEMESTER
This Friday, May 1, at 7:00 P.M.
Zwerdling-Cohen Chapel, 1429 Hill St.

1' - '

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