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April 26, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-26

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y, 4PRIL26,1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAI

Crises of Leadership Confront

K rushchev, Mao

I

USSR Army
Hits Politics
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
Premier Nikita- S. Khrushchev
and hissupporters, involved in a
complex, many-sided policy de-
bate, may be contemplating with
dread the possibility that a new
United States-Soviet confronta-
tion over Cuba could bring Moscow
an impossible choice.
The U.S.-Cuban quarrel over
American reconnaissance flights,
comes at an awkward time for the
Kremlin.
Bedeviled by 'unrelenting nag-
ging from the Communist Chinese,
the Soviet Party is going to
lengths to justify in the eyes of
Communists at home and abroad'
not only its foreign policies but
even its strictly domestic policies.

A spate of dialectical discussions
in the Soviet press is accompanied
by an odd obligato: a lively dis-
cussion about military affairs,
leaving the reader wondering
whether certain elements of the
high military brass are unhappy
about aspects of Khrushchev's
program.
Questions
All this raises many intriguing
questions:
-Why has an elaborate defense
of" Soviet internal economic and
Communist Party policies been
necessary in- the Soviet press?
-Are the world Communists
split and the Chinese attacks be-
ginning to erode some of the con-
fidence of Khrushchev's support-
ers?
-Why is so much being printed
about the role of the Soviet Com-
munist Party and its control in-
side the armed forces?
-Why did Defense Minister
Rodion Y. Malinovsky a career
military man, see fit in a recent

Michigan 'Plan C'

article to make clear that Khrush-
chev during World War II was
essentially a political officer?
We Liked Him
Malinovsky wrote'that "we mili-
tary commanders" were encourag-
ed by Khrushchev's work in "poli-
tical administrations and staffs
at the front the political organs
of units and party and Komsomol
(Young Communist) organizations
of units." Was this to put Khrush-
chev in his place as a man whose
basic experience was that of poli-,
tical commissar rather than mili-
tary strategist?
The present political chief of
the armed forces, a nonmilitary
party man named A. A Yepishev,
also had .a recent article in which
he paid tribute to Khrushchev for
creating a "new type" of armed
forces.
Khrushchev, trying to build up
the Soviet internal economy, in-
sists on a policy of heavy reliance
on nuclear-missile defenses. This
suggests less emphasis on massive
conventional forces, and it is
known some generals have been
unhappy about this policy.
One Man
The party press pays much at-
tention these days to the notion
of "one-man command" in the
armed forces. At the same time
it insists that the Communist
Party retain strict control. Is, this
to mollify officers who, once
again, are balking at too much
civilian interference?
All these questions are raised
against the backdrop of new clouds
over theCaribbean-possibly omi-
nous clouds for Khrushchev.
The .Soviet government news-
paper Izvestia, considered a direct
reflection of Khrushchev, carried
a long protest .Friday against the
U.S. overflights. At first glance
it might have seemed a bellicose
protest.
But laced throughout Izvestia's
discussion was a tone of pleading,
as if an appeal to remember the
Caribbean crisis of N1962, when
the world trembled on the brink
of war.

China Faces
Ruler Gaps
By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER
Associated Press Diplopiatic- Writer
WASHINGTON - Communist
China faces at least two major
crises of leadership in the next
10 or 15 years as its aging rulers
relinquish power to younger
men according to United States
intelligence studies on once-secret
Chinese military .documents.
U.S. officials believe the changes
that wil come about in these crises
may profoundly alter Red China's
attitude toward the outside world,
including, the United State-s.
Two other points which stand
out in the intelligence reports are:
-Red China under the leader-
ship of Mao Tse-Tung is follow-
ing a strategy of stalemate toward
the U.S. while it concentrates on
promoting revolutionary move-
ments in underdeveloped countries;
particularly in Africa.
Like a Mat
One of the Chinese military
documents states that "When the
opportunity is ripe, the wave of
revolution will roll up the con-
tinent of Africa ike a mat."
-The Chinese Reds are devot-
ing considerable resources to a
program for developing atomic
weapons, though one of their mili-

RODION Y. MALINOVSKY
World 'News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
BINH CHANH, Viet Nam --
Striking with a vigor praised by
their United States advisers, Viet-
namese 'troops routed the Com-
munists' veteran 514th battalion
yesterday.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Ariz) picged up
eight more Republican convention
delegates yesterday in his cam-
paign to win the GOP presidential
nomination.
DAMASCUS - Syrian Premier
Gen. Amin Hafez yesterday an-
nounced a provisional constitution
proclaiming Syria a sovereign
"peoples' democratic socialist re-
public." The 82-article provisional
constitution abolished martial law
which has been in force since
March 1963.

tary leaders estimated in January
1961 that if they got into a big
war three to five years from then
they would still have to rely on
conventional weapons. Meanwhile
leaders take the position, accord-
ing to one of the previously se-
cret documents, that "Although
the material atomic bomb is im-
portant, the spiritual atomic bomb
is more important"-apparently a
statement of faith in their own
Communist world view.
Also, the documents make clear
that the Red Chinese leaders be-
lieve they cannot be defeated by
long range nuclear weapons-such
as U.S missiles-and if they were
invaded they would rely on their
vast military manpower. One es-
timate is that in April 1961 there
were supposed to be 200 million
armed and organized militiamen.
Studies by U.S.
These conclusions and estimates
about Red Chinese policy and
strength are set forth in research
studies prepared for the State
Department's Bureau of Intel-
ligence and Research and based
on military papers dealing with
both military and political issues
which were circulated in Red
China in 1961.
Intestimony released recently.
Thomas L. Hughes, State Depart-
ment intelligence chief, told a
House Appropriations Subcommit-
tee that "the new materials gave
us a look at the dark side of the
moon in Communist China."
The Red Chinese secret papers

love andmarriage-coll ege yle
The bridge from student tomarried student is along and very narrow
oneslaced with parental opposition, financial burdens and immatu-
rity. Yet, thousands of young men and women cross it every year.
How well do they make the transition from carefree, fun-loving
"dates" to responsible husbands, wives:..and often parents?
A recent nationwide study by Redbook magazine brings to light
some of the strains, the dangers and the possible benefits of col-
lege marriages. It's must reading for every undergrad l
MAY REDBOOk
THE MAGAZINE FOR YOUNG ADULTS / On sale at your newsstand now

Once Again - The Famous TCE
EUROPEAN STUDENT TOURS
(Some tours include an exciting visit to Israel)
The fabulous, long-established Tours that include
manyunique features: live several days with a
French family -- special opportunities to make
friends, abroad, special cultural events, evening
entertainment, meet students from all over the world.
Travel by Deluxe Motor Coach.
t-
SUMMER e 53 Days in Europe $705." ALL
1963 INCLUSIVE
Transatlantic Transportation Available
Travel Arrangements Made For Independent SPECIL
-Groups On Request At Reasonable Prices ?OP IDY
UNnJVEAN
TRAVEL & CULTURAL EXCHANGE, INC. Dept. C AVAI fsIs
501 Fifth Ave. N. Y. 17, N. Y. * OX 7-4129
Which one reminds you of Mother?
SCALE CHAMPAGNEB UCKET
ENAMELED A£
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SEWING MACHINE TELEPHONE
Any one will rememnber you to her

THIS IS 'PLAN C,? passed by the state House of Representatives.
yesterday. The plan, which establishes districts for the state
Senate if the state Supreme Court fails to do so in the new
future, is similar to one drawn up by Gov. George Romney and
has been endorsed by him. However, it is substantially different
from the plan passed by the Senate in a surprise move Wednes-
day night. (Districts 1 and 12-19 are included in the area near
Detroit.)

Come in and See our Wide Selection of
for Mother's Day and Graduation Day.

arcade jewelry shop
16 Nickels Arcade

PROFILE ON LABOR
presents
LEONARD WOODCOCK
Vice-President United Auto Workers
speaking on
THE FUTURE
OF ORGANIZED LABOR:
ACCENT ON YOUTH

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Monday, April

27

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