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April 24, 1964 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

G4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ii

JI( ch 44"o
BY GARY WINER

Wolverine

Nine

Whitewash Notre

Dame, 2

Bring On the Show,
But Fans Must Go
Tradition is a great thing when it comes to saluting the flag or
cheering the President, but it becomes. absurd to use tradition as an
excuse for opposing any changes.
Why can't the University have women cheerleaders? "Tradition"
one might answer, but is that really a sufficient response? Does the
student body accept that as a final answer?
I don't know how too many others feel on this subject, but I'll
go on record right now as favoring female cheerleaders.
As it stands at present, the University is one of the few (if
not the only) co-educational schools in the nation that does not
use women for leading cheers at its football and basketball games.
I attended the NCAA basketball finals at Kansas City earlier this
year, and quite frankly, I was embarrassed because we were the only
school without real cheerleaders or a pep band present.
True, our official male cheerleaders were participating in the
NCAA gymnastics meet, and two volunteers substituted for them, but
women cheerleaders could have attended the games.
The fact that-we had no pep band present is most likely a result
of no one having the. desire to take a little extra time to organize
several members of the marching band.
I don't think that I really have to justify to anyone why
Michigan should have- women cheerleaders. Quite to the contrary,
I think someone should explain to me why we can't have them-
and an answer such as "tradition" holds no water, whatsoever.
Maybe I'm the only one on campus who feels this way, but if
anyone has an opinion on this matter, either pro or con, I'd appre-
ciate hearing from him. Let's once and for all find out just exactly
what the students feel about using women cheerleaders.
* *~ * -
Well, last night Toronto won the sixth game of the Stanley Cup
series and I hope the Red Wings lose the whole thing in the final
contest. As a matter of fact, I hope that every Detroit sports team
for at least the next year (my stay on campus) loses every game in
which it participates.
It's not that I hate Detroit sports teams, it's just that I don't like
the sports fans associated with them.
They think every Detroit team (which the exception of the
Pistons) is the greatest team in its respective league; that their
team cannot possibly lose a contest. (except if the referees are
against them); and that anyone who doesn't cheer for Detroit
is out of his mind.
With a Detroit fan, Milt Plum is great (best passer in tht league),,
Norm Ullman is fantastic (greatest of all time), and Jake Wood is
superb (definitely Hall of Fame material). A Detroit team is bound
to win a championship every year, at least that's what the fans say
prior to the beginning of the season.
When a Motor City team wins a game, the Detroiters shout in
my ears,.stamp on my feet, and block the entrance to my History 562
lecture.
Funny thing seems to be that when I ask a Detroit fan to place
a wager on a game, he meekly sneaks away, mumbling something
about Detroit teams still being the best in sports.
Every now and then I have to .see how my Cleveland Indians are
doing, although I usually attempt to limit the thought to just once
a week.
It seems that the Tribe bought pitcher Gene Conley from the
Red Sox yesterday, and promptly farmed him out to its Burlington
(N.C.) club because he has a a sore arm.
I have to really give the Indians' front office some credit for
that deal.-At least they're only wasting money these days. I remember
a time, not too long ago, when Cleveland traded unknown Norm Cash
for unknown Steve Demeter..
That's right, im still asking myself, "Who's Demeter?"

Special To The Daily
SOUTH BEND-The Michigan
Wolverines are going into the Big
Ten season this afternoon at Mad-
ison with a little momentum from
yesterday's 2-0 whitewash of No-
tre Dame.
Converted basketball player Paul
Schuldt, a 6'2", 170-pound jun-
ior righthander blanked the Irish
on just three scattered singles as
the Wolverines boosted their sea-
son record to 6-10, compared to
6-8 for Notre Dame..
Schuldt walked just three and
struck out one en route to his
second victory of the year and
the third time in 16 games that a
Michigan pitcher has gone the dis-
tance.
Rally in Fifth
The Wolverines picked up what
proved to be the only runs of the
game in the fifth when after one
was out, George Skaff drew the
only walk off Notre Dame pitching
of the. game. Bob Gilhooley slash-
ed a single to right and Chan
Simonds followed with a single,
scoring Skaff.

Pete Adams, who caught while
regular catcher Ted Sizemore re-
placed Earl Meyers. in left, hit
a liner off the shortstop's dove.
By the time Bob Kristowski had
recovered the ball, speedster Gil-
hooley had crossed the plate with
the second run. Adams was thrown
out, while Simonds aC ianced to
third, only to be stranded when
Schuldt grounded out.
The Wolverines mustered up

their entire offensive attack in
the fifth, as they didn't get an-
other man on base until the sev-
enth when Skaff was stranded
after hitting a single.
Erased Tate
The only other Michigan base-
runner was Ron Tate who got on
by virtue of an error in the sec-
ond, but was erased on a neat
short - to - second - to - first dou-
ble play.

Notre Dame could only put one
man past first base the. entire
game as the Wolverines came up
with two double plays to stave
off each threat by the Irish.
The only minor threat was in
the first inning when Rich Gonski
singled with one out, stole second,
and went to third on Schuldt's
wild pitch. But Gonski couldn't
score as the next two men popped
out to retire the side.

/

STANLEY CUP SERIES TIED:

Leafs Beat Wings in Overtime

The other two hits off the Tin-
ley Park, Ill., junior were scatter-
ed in the fourth and sixth, but
neither could advance past first.
Notre Dame had hopes of a
come-from-behind win In the
ninth when Kristowski' led off
with a walk. But he went no fur-
ther than first as the 'second,
third and fourth hitters all lifted
easy fly balls to end the game.
Cancel Co-Rec
TUBEY SAYS: "Because of
the overbearing presence of
Michigras, no co-recreation will
be held tonight in the Intra-
Mural Sports Building."
The Wolverines left immediate-
ly after the game for Madison,;
where they'll open the Big Ten
season this afternoon against the
highly - rated Badgers. Junior'
southpaw Clyde Barnhart 'is ex-
pected to pitch today, while the
selections for the doubleheader at
Northwestern on Saturday have
not been decided by Moby Bene-
dict.
I--

MICHIGAN AB R H RE
Laslo, 2b - 0 0 a
Sizemore, 1't' 4 0 0 0
Campbell, ss 4 0- 03
Tate, cf 4 0 040
Skaft, 3b 2 1:1 0
Gilhooley, rr 3 1 1 03
Simonds, lb 3 0 1 1
P. Adams, c 3 0 0 1
Schuldt, p 3 0 0 0.
Totals 30 2 3 2
NOTRE DAME AB R H R
Kristowski, 2b 3 0 10 40
Gonski, ss 4 0 1 0
Counsell, rf 4 0 00
Fitzmaurice, cf 4- 0 1 0
Blyghe, 3b 2 0 0 03
Schrader, lb 3 0 00
Czajko, if 2 0 0 0
Snow, a 3 0043
Karazim, p2 0 1 0
Kennedy, p 0 0 0 03
a-Rjeder 1 0 0 43
Totals 28 0 3 0
a-Flied out for Karazim in 8th.
MiCHIGAN 000 020 000-2 - 3 0
NOTRE DAME 000 000 000 0 3 1
E-Schrader. DP-Campbell, Laslo
and Simonds; Campbell and Sim-
onds; Gonski, Kristowski and Schra-
der. LOB-Michigan 2, Notre -Dame
'4.-SB-Gonski.
PITCHING SUMMARIES
IP H R ER BB S
Schuldt (W, 2-0) 9 3 0 0 3 1
-Karazlni(L,2-2) 8 3 2 2 1 3
Kennedy 1 0 0 0 0 0
W P-SIiuldt.

iy The Associated Press

I

DETROIT-Bob Baun's goal one
miute and 43 seconds into the
first overtime period last night
gave the -Toronto Maple Leafs a
4-3 Stanley Cup final playoff vic-
'tory over the Detroit Red Wings
and knotted the series at three
games each.
The deciding game will be play-
ed in Toronto tomorrow night.
Baun's goal was the first on
the Detroit net in the sudden-

death overtime session. He skated
in front of the net as Bob Pul-
ford shot and deflected the puck
past Detroit goalie Terry Sawchuk
before he could make a move.
The Red Wings had only one
shot on the Toronto net in the
overtime but Johnny Bower easily
flipped it aside.
The goal was Baun's second of
the playoff. He had scored only
four in the entire National Hockey

Johnson Pitches No-Hitter
But Loses Contest to Reds

HOUSTON (P)--Houston's Ken
Johnson pitched the first no-hitter
of the season last night, but was
beaten by his former Cincinnati
teammates 1-0 when the Reds
scored in the ninth on two er-
rors.
It was the first time in major
league history that a pitcher had
hurled nine no-hit innings and
lost.
Houston played the ganie under
protest, because of a disputed
play in the bottom half of the
ninth inning.
The last pitcher to lose a no-
hitter was Pittsburgh's, Harvey
Haddix, who went 12 innings
against Milwaukee in 1959 before
the Braves won 1-0 in the 13th
inning. There have been various

other instances of pitchers losing
no-hitters in extra innings.
Johnson, a 30-year-old knuckle-
ball specialist drafted from the
Reds in the 1961 National League
expansion draft, placed himself
in jeopardy with one out in the
ninth when he fielded a bunt by
Pete Rose and threw wildly to
first base. Rose went to second
base on the play.
Johnson then got Chico Ruiz
to hit a grounder to third base-
man Bob Aspromonte, who threw
out the runner as Rose reached
third.
Vada Pinson'then sent a
grounder to veteran second base-
man Nellie Fox, who booted the
ball. Rose raced across the plate
with the only run of the garde.
Johnson got Frank Robinson to
fly out to left fielder Jim Wynn
for the final out.
The Colts thus went to the bot-
tom of the ninth trailing 1-0 with
Cincinnati starter Joe Nuxhall
work-ing on a five-hitter.

League season.
Baun was taken off the ice on
a stretcher in the third period
with an apparent ankle injury. He
returned to the bench in less than
two minutes and continued to take
his regular skating turns.
Bob Pulford put the Maple Leafs
ahead with the -only goal of the
first period, scoring while Toron-
to had a man in the penalty box.
+ The five other markers came in
a fast-skating second period with
Paul Henderson, Pit Martin, and
Gordie Howe scoring for Detroit
and Pulford and Billy Harris for
the Maple Leafs.
Detroit twice took the lead in
that second period but could not
keep its advantage.
After Toronto had outshot the
Red Wings 15-8 in the first' per-
iod Detroit took command in the
next two and outshot their op-
ponents 32-20.
Toronto played a bit more cau-
tiously in the third period than
did the Red Wings as was indi-
cated by a 16-8 shooting edge.
Detroit's best chance came at
6:04 when Carl Brewer was sent
off for hooking Floyd Smith. Bow-
er was at his best during this per-
iod as Howe, Eddie Joyal, and
Larry Jeffrey all fired hard ones
from close in. But Bruce Mac-
Gregor had the best chance as his
shot - from the left side of the
crease slipped under Bower but
either hit his skate or the post
and bounced away.
With four minutes remaining
Toronto's Ron Stewart broke in
on Sawchuk and fired with the
Detroit netminder blocking the
net with his pads. Sawchuk then
sat down on the ice thinking the
puck was under him, but it had
slipped away and Doug Barkley
came over and bucked it under
Sawchuk for a face off.

' PROFESSOR HELEN WHITE
Chairman, English Department
University of Wisconsin
IS THERE A "CATHOLIC NOVELIF
Friday, April 24 . . . 8:00 P.M.
Newman Center, 331 Thompson

,- rr aa~au~ty.

A

PETE ADAMS

II

11

Major League Standings

1

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Baltimore 5 2 .714
x-Cieveland 2 1 .667
Minnesota 5 3 .625
Boston 4 3 .571
Detroit 4 3 .571
x-Los Angeles 3 3 .500
Washington 3 5 .375
Chicago 2 4 .333
New York 2 4 .333
Kansas City 1 3 .250
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 5, Minnesota 4
Boston 3-0, Baltimore 1-1 (t-n)
Cleveland at Los Angeles (mc)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Minnesota
Boston at Chicago (n)
Cleveland at Los Angeles (n)
Washington at Kansas City (n1)
Only games scheduled

*T
*
T
*1
*
*~
T
*
*
*
*
*
*~
*
*.
*1

25
STYLES
and many colors
TO CHOOSE FROM
$300,

QUALITY
SWEAT SHIRTS

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
I
14
l ,
1
2 %
2f4

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago
Los Angeles
New York

W L Pct. GBL
5 1 .833 -
6 2 .750 -
4 3 .571 1%,
5 4 .556 1 f
5 4 .556 12
4 4 .500 2
4 4 .444 21/
3 4 .429 2 f,
2 7 .222 4%
1 5 .167 4

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 5, New York Y
Piladelphiia 6, Pittsburgh 5
Cincinnati 1, Houston 0
Los Angeles 7, St. Louis 5
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAIES
San Francisco at Cincinnati (n)
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (n)
New oYrk at Pittsburgh (n)
Houston at St. Louis (n)
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)

U. of M. GROUP FLIGHT
30-DAY STAY IN EUROPE
$49d34
JET LEAVING DETROIT JULY 14th
Returning from Brussels Aug. 12th
Call Les Thurston, -NOrmandy 3-5718

ALSO:
BOOTI ES
BIBS SWEATERS
CH I LDREN'S
AND"T" SHIRTS ALL SIZES
UL RICHS BOOKSTORE l

The NCAA the other day placed Kentucky on suspension for one
year because of violations in spring football practice procedures. It
seems that the Wildcats were.
holding conditioning periods prior
to the official start of practice,
and making such workouts man-
datory for football players, but
also open 'to other students.
Where Kentucky made its
big mistake, thus l9aving itself
open to NCAA sanctions, was in
failing to assign the workouts
a course number in the school
of education.

yr t* k r r** t lryk ir lr# r . k# Iratylr# **ylr ir#yk k k*iri ak iryfi 4 k ' lti ' k'

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I/

Even Slippery Rock was placed
on a similar football suspension-
what's happening to our ideals?
Although this is supposed to be
my column, I've decided to share
half of it with .the readers. If
anyone has a comment, story, or
question they wish to send.to me,
I'll attempt to print as many of
them as possible.
Carr Sayers
In 220 Race
DES MOINES UP)-A 220-yard
duel between two fleet Olympic
candidates today starts the an-
nual . assault on track and field
records at the Drake Relays.
Battling in the special furlong
will be Henry Carr of Arizona
State and Roger Sayers of Oma-
ha, both prime spring contenders
for the U.S. Olympic track team
this fall.
The special race between the
two former football players took
on added interest when the other
Drake feature-the mile run-lost
some of its attraction when Tom
O'Hara of Loyola of Chicago an-
nounced he was not yet ready to
go all out.
Drake Relays officials are
counting on Carr and Sayers to
shatter the 220 record of 21.4
seconds set in 1961, the last time
the event was held here.

:III

Th. VIRGINIIN
RESTAURANT

hl

-L

State St. on Campus

Phone NO 3-3441

i

T4

OLD HEID ELBERG
211-213 N. Main St. NO 8-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

FRI., SAT., and SUN. DINNER SPECIAL
Grilled Petite
New York Strip Steak

DIXIELAND

'1111

served with onnon ring garniture,
french fried potatoes, tossed garden
salad, hot delicious coffee.

$150

"The New Wolverine
Jazz Band"
OLD HEIDELBERG
-TONIGHT-

DINE.
OUT!

S.,
7Q

t

SPECIAL LUNCHEON SERVED DAILY-95c

Hours: 7 A.M. 'til 8 P.M. Daily and Sunday

Closed Tuesdays

ff

Il''El--il

f

1

1
t,
}
t fee

H
I

URRY ! HURRY!
8 Va rieties Of
icious Pancakes at
FOafLEReS
e House and Coffee Shop }

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
I IZ±AM
will be served daily from
4 P.M.-1:30 A.M.

AFTER THE
FAIR
GET YOUR
RED HOT

PIZZA

at

PancakE

Cota e-fIn

"..

warn. prices t~yoJu can affoil ILa;

11

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