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April 18, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

inimum age
Passes in Senate
Would Establish $1 Floor; Bill Goes,
To House for Final Concurrence
LANSING (G)-The Senate yesterday passed Gov. George W.
Romney's $1 hourly minimum wage bill 22-9 and sent it to the House
for concurrence in an amendment.
A coalition of Democrats and Romney's floor leaders killed
three crippling amendments which earlier had been tacked on by
Senate Republicans. The bill goes to the House-which already has
approved the bill in the form Romney submitted it-in the same,
<" form as it was when released by
Ithe Senate Labor Committee.
Propose Stdy The committee, headed by Sen.
Y1Robert VanderLaan (R-Grand
f 0 1 W orkers Rapids), has changed the House
' -endorsed measure to make it 11-
t legal for employers to habitually
1om pensation fire their workers to avoid pay-
ing the minimum.

INTENSIVE U.S. SUPPORT:
Viet Cong 'Lightning Strokes' Bring Key Gains

By The Associated Press "
LANSING-The creation of a
legislative interim committee to
study Michigan's workmen's com-
pensation laws was proposed yes-
terday by the chairman of the
House Labor Committee.
Two resolutions sponsored by
Rep. Riemer Van Til (R-Holland)
noted that a bill calling for chang-
es in the laws died in committee
this year "amid much controver-
sy.''
They added that public hearings
on the bill revealed a need for
"detailed study by the Legisla-
ture to determine . . . whether
benefits are adequate, whether un-
reasonable delay exists in proces-
sing and hearing of claims, wheth-
er abuses exist... and why in the
past eight years employer rates
and costs have sharply increased
and compensation payments more
than doubled "despite a lack of
legislative action or material in-
crease in reported injuries."
Van Til asked that a six-mem-
ber interim study committee, with
three from the Senate, or a five-
member House committee be ap-
pointed to "investigate and study"
the entire structure of the law.
Also in Lansing, House commit-
tees sidetracked Gov. George W.
Romney's county home rule pro-
posal and a government reorgani-
zation plan which Romney did not
include in his legislative program
but gave endorsement.
On a technical change in rules,
a Senate bill setting up a state
boundary commission with author-
ity over territory annexations was
kept alive in the House State Af-
fairs Committee.

No Difficulty.
VanderLaan said there would be
no difficulty in winning the House
Labor Committee's endorsement
of the bill.
Hke said he was "very, very
pleased" by the bill's passage.
The amendments to the House-
approved bill would have:
- Exempted all employers of
farm labor from observing the
statutory minimum.
Exclude 18-Year-Olds
-Cut the age bracket eligible
for the minimum wage from 18-65
to 22-62.
-Knocked out the bill's provi-
sions to graduate the minimum to
$1.15 in 1966 and $1.25 in 1967.
The three Republican-sponsor-
ed amendments were among 10
that were thrown at the bill dur-
ing initial debate Thursday. At-
tempts to exempt theatres, fishing
firms, small businesses and resort
hotels from'the bill were also de-
feated.
Essential Issue
The minimum wage bill ranks
high on Aomney's legislative pro-
fram for this year and is viewed
as an essential issue in the 1964
election campaign if he runs for
re-election.
The farm labor exemption was
sponsored by Sen. Harry Litowich
(R-Benton Harbor).
Sens. Emil Lockwood (R-St.
Louis) and Lester Begick (R-Bay
City) teamed 'up on the more re-
strictive age bracket amendment.
Their arguments were that stu-
dents in the 18-22 age group, and
retirees in the 62-65 age bracket,
would lose their sources of part-
time jobs which pay lass than $1
an hour.

By MALCOLM W. BROWNE
Associated Press Staff Writer
GO DEN, Viet Nam - Despite
nearly three years of intensive
American economic and military
support for South Viet Nam, the
Viet Cong enemy has gained
steadily and dangerously in key
areas.
Long An province, almost a
suburb of Saigon, is one of them.
This densely populated and agri-
culturally 'rich province has slid
into almost complete Communist
domination in the last year.
Earl Young of Port Huron, an
American military advisor, sifted
through the wreckage of a Viet-
namese defense post only 15 miles
from Saigon recently, and shook
his head wearily.
"The biggest problem we face
is overcoming local inertia," he
said..
Blasted Outpost,
In a lightning stroke here the
night before, Communist guerril-
las had blown up a key police
post on the highway to the Me-
kong River delta, demolished a
military post, inflicted more than
100 casualties on government de-
fenders and made off with 115
weapons. Many of the government
troops died in their beds with no
warning.
Once again, the Viet Cong had
gotten the best of Long An prov-
ince-and of South Viet Nam and
the West.
The material stuff of victory
over the Viet Cong was not lack-
ing. Since November, 1962, United
States dollars have been pumped
into the province in civil aid pro-
jects. The strategic hamlet plan
launched by the Ngo Dinh Diem
government with American back-
ing was heavily emphasized in
Long An.
Large army units have been op-
erating in the province most of
the time. A crash pacification pro-
gram for Long An, personally
backed by Ambassador Henry Ca-
bot Lodge, began Jan. 15.
Defend Hamlet
The overall scheme was to start
by securing a handful of hamlets
already under government control,
then to improve the political and
social situation inside them, and
then to expand gradually out-
ward.
Troops were to occupy newly
cleared areas as long as necessary
to rehabilitate them. At least two
battalions have been on call in
Long An ever since then. But pro-
gress since Jan. 15 is hard to
measure.
Young, an army platoon leader
in the Korean war, has been a
U.S. aid mission fieldman in Viet
Nam since October, 1962. For
seven months, he has been the
man on the spot in Long An
province.
Does he think the problem of
"local inertia" can be overcome in
Long An?
"If I didn't think so I would
have left long ago. We're trying
a combination of means. One is
by bringing pressure from the
Saigon level on the local officials
down here, and making officials
at the ministerial level aware of
what the situation really is-a
situation that needs their close
support and supervision.
Lcal Work
"We're also working at the pro-
vincial administration level, mak-
ing these people aware of the
materials and assistance available,

proposing a variety of plans, and
so on.
"But until lately, there has been
no awareness on the Vietnamese
civilian official side that things
must be conducted as if there were
a war on.
"The red tape is still there, in
piles. Suppose a peasant wants to
get a loan from the (American-
financed) National Agricultural
Credit Qrganization.hNACO loans
are important to the little guy.
Three or four thousand piastres
($30 or $40) on loan can give him
enough fertilizer to increase his
rice yield by 50 per cent, which
might mean a profit for the year.
"Up until last week NACO was
a banker's operation-that is you
needed good reference and po-
litical clearance to get a loan.
NACO in Saigon is promising to
help this system, and start get-
ting their agents out in the ham-
lets to do some good where it's
needed."
Pacification?
What about Diem's efforts to
pacify Long An province, and the
strategic hamlet program here?
"Diem's government started the
strategic hamlet program in Jan-
uary and February of 1962,"
Young said. "He sent In a general
with a regiment of troops, and
built hamlets to beat the band.
"The U.S. aid mission came in
with its supporting program, and
the whole thing reached a peak
early in the summer of 1963. About
10,000 families averaging five or
six people per family were re-
located in strategic hamlets.
"U.S. military advisors said that
in April and May last year, they
could drive anywhere in the prov-
ince without needing escorts. And
yet, by November, when Diem
was overthrown the situation was
completely the opposite, with the
Viet Cong in control almost every-
where.
Peaked'in July
'The rate of attacks, terror,
sabotage and all the rest hit a
peak last July. That month, they
made 77 attacks on strategic ham-
lets in Long An province alone.
"Along toward November, the
incident rate dropped off-not be-
cause the Viet Cong was getting
tired, but because they had already
cleaned out or thoroughly infil-
trated all the hamlets.
"They tore down more than 100
miles of fence Diem had put up
around the hamlets. They had
demoralized the hamlet militia, re-
stricted the self-defense corps to
completely stationary defense, de-
moralized the provincial civil serv-
ice and public works teams, and
so on.
"It was a vicious circle. The
hamlets had been built with great
urgency and not much fore-
thought. Representatives of the
various services never visited any
of the hamlets, partly because
there were so many at consider-
able distance from government
control centers. That was the first
part of the cycle.
Military Division
"The Viet Cong started going
in. This created not only a geo-
graphical but a military separa-
tion of the hamlets from govern-
ment control, and government of-
ficials came around less and less.
"The Viet Cong tactic was 95
per cent effective in eliminating
government influence in Long An
province, both in terms of morale
and politics in 1963.

"It took the Viet Cong a long
time to get cranked up, and we'
had a nice honeymoon here, in
which the government could have
gone in and finished the job.
"Instead of that, Diem pulled
his general and his regiment out,
leaving no miiltary support. Then,
when the Viet Cong began hitting
hard, Saigon just didn't seem to
care. Diem was busy with political
problems in Saigon. This was the
final phase of the cycle.
Honesty at Last
"After the Nov. 1 coup, we be-
gan to get honest answers for the
first time from Vietnamese gov-
ernment personnel, on the real
extent of the Viet Cong conquest
on Long An.
"In December, we were able to
make the estimate that of the
theoretical 219 hamlets, only 25-
40 were still under government in-
fluence and willing to offer some
resistance to the Viet Cong.
"We've been trying to build out

from about a dozen hamlets close
to the province capital at Tan An
-some of them only a few hun-
dred yards away. We haven't gone
far.
"The fantastic reshuffling of
government officials that began
last summer continues right up
to this minute.
"There has been constant
change in military and civilian
functionaries and leaders, uncer-
tainty about national policy, con-
stant changes in Saigon, complete
uncertainty about what's to be
done, who will do it and now, who
the province chief will be to-
morrow,, and so on.
"Until we--the Vietnamese gov-
ernment and their American ad-
visors-can get the Vietnamese
people interested in winning this
thing, it could go on forever.
There's the problem. We've got to
solve it."

WASHINGTON WP) - A sharp
rise in consumer spending was the
major factor expanding the na-
tion's economy in the first three
months of 1964, the Commerce De-
partment reported yesterday..
The annual rate of purchases
for personal consumption increas-
ed $8.1 billion in the first three
months.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
reported Thursday that the gross
national product-the total of all
goods and services - increased
about $8.5 billion on an annual
rate basis to $608.5 billion.
The advance for the first quar-
ter of 1964 was not as great as the
increase in the final three months
of 1963. The Commerce Depart-
ment said this was largely due
to a decrease in the rate of busi-
ness inventory expansion.
The advance in, the personal
consumption annual rate was from
$379.9 billion to $388 billion, com-

7

worid News
Roundup

11

I

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS -- A letter
seeking immediate action from the
UN Security Council on South
Africa's r'acial situation was sub-
mitted yesterday to the 58 Afri-
can and Asian delegations.
JACKSON, Miss.--An all-white
jury deadlocked yesterday in the
murder trial of Byron de la Beck-
with, and Judge Leon Hendrick
immediately declared a mistrial.
Judge Hendrick set $10,000 bond
for Beckwith, who has, been held
in jail without bond since his
arrest last June for the slaying of
Negro integration leader Medgar
Evers.
INDIANAPOLIS-Former Min-
nesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen
opened an intensive campaign for
Indiana's Republican presidential
primary yesterday with a call for
a rewritten and strengthened
United Nations charter.
Stassen said the next presi-
dent should work toward a goal
of getting the UN charter rewrit-
ten in 1966 to provide for a gen-
eral council in which the- world's
nations would have their }votes
"weighted" to reflect the distribu-
tion of world power.
*, * - *
UNITED NATIONS-Ambassa-
dor Adlai E. Stevenson said yes-
teiday that he felt that his work
here took precedence over any race
for the United States Senate. He
gave that reply to a reporter who
asked if he would be willing to run
for, senator from New York on
the Democratic ticket.
* * *
NEW YORK - The stock ex-
change closed with new record
averages yesterday. The DowJones
30 industrials were up 1.68, 20 rails
up .37, 15 utilities up .49 and 65
stocks up .64.

NO
MICHIGRAS IS NOT A CONCERT!
MICHIGRAS IS NOT A DANCE!
YES!
MICHIGRAS IS A BIG PARADE!
(10 Bands, 20 Floats and Special Events !
Friday, April 24, 3:30 p.m.)
MICHIGRAS IS A CARNIVAL!'
(with.
Skill Booths, Show Booths, Food, Prizes,
and 15 Amusement Rides at FERRY FIELD)
MICHIGRAS also is very crowded!
So Be Smart, Buy Your Tickets Now,
Avoid Long Lines Later' On Sale
Daily, 9-3 DAIG and UNION Steps.
MICHIGRAS EVENTS WILL BE COVERED ON RADIO
BY WCBN AND THE ANN ARBOR STATIONS

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STUDENTS ..
ALL UNPAID
SUBSCRIPTIONS
CLASSIFIED ADS
DISPLAY ADS
MUST BE PAID
THIS WEEK-OR GRADES
WILL BE WITHHELD

moon

Publicity-Secretariat-Programs
SOPH SHOW
MASS MEETING

Wednesday,

April 22-7:15

Michigan Room-League
'64 Show Will Be Announced

- . - -- . - -
WOULDN'T YOU KNOW
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Straps make Delightful open

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ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Mokin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Brocklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors

1833 Washtenow Ave.
For transportation call NO 8-7048.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School far pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
1 1 :00 a.m. Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00.p.m.

OF CHRIST

1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

:_ :'

$Q99
v

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Boned insoles

(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service & Communion
11 :00 a.m. Worship Service
6:00 p.m. Supper for International Students
Speaker: Rev. Paul Dotson, Protestant
Foundation.

styles, beautifully made in Italy. Have fur
AVimipei ~CroffBCream calf strapns Cush

Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Commnion - Second Sunday of every

I . WEDNESDAY

S

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