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April 17, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE, SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGES. SIX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

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M' Gridders Use Films

To Improve Attack

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Yanks, Ford Lose in Opener

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By GIL SAMBERG
You can't be a ham and your
make-up may not be the best, but
everyone wants to be a scene-
stealer in a Bump Elliott movie
production.
Elliott's scenery and method is
simple. He finds a field, marks off
a rectangular area 100 yards long
by 51 yards wide, and further
stripes it with white lines at five-
yard intervals. He then lines up
two groups of eleven men on a
given Saturday, has them face
each other, places an elliptical ball
at the front of one group, then
blows a whistle. Then it's every
man for himself.
"Using films we can see what a
player is doing wrong or what he
should be doing where we won't
notice them in a practice," says
football coach Bump Elliott. Films
in football have become a strategic
tool for the coach. In spring prac-

tice the ability to look at a play a
number of times allows him to
follow each man individually and
to determine how well a player
executes his assignment.
At Scrimmages
The filming is usually done on
Saturdays at the weekly scrim-
mage. At the first scrimmage
freshman basketball coach Tom
Jorgensen recorded the action
from a high perch using a Univer-
sity extension truck. "We'll by no
means film a whole practice," says
Elliott. This is not necessary be-
cause certain plays are usually re-
peated often. Footage is allowed,
however, when different teams are
running these plays.
The films are processed over the
weekend and the coaches can
analyze them on Monday. Not only
can they then judge players by
what they see, but also alter their
plays for more effectiveness. Al-

though the varsity is not shown
these pictures as a group, players
can come into the Athletic Admin-
istration Building during an off
hour and go over the shots.
Use Films
Changes in the Blue, White and
Gold units' members are also made
partly on the. basis of what the
camera records on Saturday. "We
judge an individual on his entire
week including the Saturday prac-
tice," comments Elliott.
This week Chuck Kines and for-
mer end Tom Mack moved up to
the tackle positions on the top-
rated Blue Team. Craig Kirby be-
came the Blue right end, moving
in with Bill Laskey at that post.
Highly-touted, but accident-prone,
Barry Dehlin was also rewarded
for his efforts by becoming the,
fullback on the Blue team along
with Mel Anthony.
Jeff Hoyne went from the third-
rated Gold team to the second-
ranked White at the right end.
spot, and speedy freshman Carl
Ward took over the role of right
halfback for the Whites. Also mov-
ing up to the White team were
quarterback Dick Vidmer, and full-
back Dave Fisher, both freshmen.
Invaluable During Season ]
When the regular season rolls1
around, football films become in-
valuable. Because it is illegal to1

ACE CAMERAMAN Tom Jorgensen is seen high above the
playing field as he films a Wolverine football scrimmage last
Saturday at Ferry Field. The coaches use the films to help
determine which unit the players will play on.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Bob Tillman's
11th-inning triple and a wild pitch
by Whitey Ford spoiled Yogi Ber-
ra's managerial debut yesterday as
the Boston Red. Sox defeated the
New York Yankees 4-3.
The Yankees, staging their 1964
opener before a slim crowd of
12,709 after being held 'up two
days by rain, tied the score at
3-3 in the eighth on singles by
Roger Maris and Tom Tresh and
an error by Chuck Schilling.
But they could do nothing
thereafter with the offerings of
speed-baller Dick RadatzandsBob
Heffner. Radatz was lifted for a
pinch hitter in the 11th and Heff-
ner proceeded to strike out Clete
Boyer and Johnny Blanchard be-
fore Phil Linz grounded out for
the final out.
Ford, who yielded 13 hits, got
rookie Tony Conigliaro on an in-
field grounder to start the 11th
but Tillman tripled off Mickey
Mantle's glove in deep center. Ro-
man Mejias was sent in to run
for the Boston catcher and Dick
Williams to bat for Radatz.
* * *
Orioles Win
CHICAGO - Johnny Orsino's
two-run homer in a four-run Bal-
timore fifth carried the Orioles to
a 4-3 victory and a two-game
sweep over the Chicago White Sox
yesterday before a crowd of 4,037.
The big Baltimore inning stem-
med mainly from a boot by Don
Buford, rookie second baseman.
The Oriole burst came after
Buford bobbled Luis Aparicio's

one-out grounder following Jackie
Brandt's single. Boog Powell's
single, a sacrifice fly and Orsino's
homer followed.
Starter Dave McNally had Chi-
cago well checked until the eighth
when he was chased on singles by
catcher Gerry McNertney and
pinch-hitter Minnie Minoso.
That brought in Harvey Haddix
who yielded a bases-loading single
to Mike Hershberger, but escaped
with one run scored on an infield
out.
Giants Shutout
SAN FRANCISCO-Veteran St.
Louis left-hander Curt Simmons
befuddled the San Francisco
sluggers with his curve ball yester-
day and shut out the Giants 2-0
on three hits.

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II

Announcing the
Spring and Summer
SHOE SHOW
April 17th & 18th
at the Coed Shop
THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
SARS FIFTH AVENUE
332 SOUTH STATE
NewYorkWhitePlans, Srngefte, Garden City.Chieago.Detrot.
Dwar MU , Aan Arbor. Pratou, New Haven, Cambridis

During the week before a game,
players get a chance to study these
traded reels. "Each player will
study his opponent as much as
possible," indicates Elliott. Each
man will thus become familiar
with the moves, the habits, the
range, and the style of his coun-
terpart on the line, or the halfback
who he will have to stop, or the
passing quarterback who he must
red dog.
On the Monday after the game,
the entire team will meet to go
over the films of the previous
Saturday so that they can correct
their own mistakes.

Minnesota
Baltimore
Boston
Detroit
Los Angeles
Washington
Cleveland
Kansas City
New York
Chicago

2
2
1
1
l
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
2
1
1
1
2

1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500
.333
.000
.000
.000
.000

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 4, Chicago 3
Boston 4, New York 3; (11 inns)
Minnesota 6, Washington 2
Only games' scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Detroit
New York at Baltimore
Chicago at Boston
Minnesota at Washington (n)
Kansas City at Cleveland

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135

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THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
9apu fo' 9ine 9e'D4
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
IPI - Z ZAI
will be served doily from

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In the
Wee Small Hours
after the
Formal .
Treat Yourself
to the
Delicious Pancakes

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