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April 11, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-11

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APRIL 11, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

D AV-1

GOP Generally Favors To Elect
Brazilian
Romney Plan; Justices President

II

'I

Biracial Groups Seek Integration

DelayA
County Lines
Still Cause
for Dispute
Thayer Statement
Supports PrOuram
By RAYMOND HOLTON
Senate Republicans, after cau-
cusing yesterday, showed "gener-
ally favorable" reaction to Gov.
George Romney's "one man, one
vote" congressional redistricting
plan, Senate Majority Leader
Stanley Thayer (R-Ann Arbor)
said yesterday.
"But, there is still opposition by'
some Republicans to the way Ro-
ney's plan cuts across county lines
In forming Michigan's 19 congres-
sional districts," he added.
Thayer said that it is neces-
sary to cross county lines in Mich-
igan "when you want to keep the
population variance between dis-
tricts below 10,000."
Romney's plan has a population
variance between the largest and
smallest district of about 3000.
Romney, in disclosing his plan
Thursday, made an appeal for bi-
partisan support. But House Re-
publicans are reportedly consid-
ering their own plan in case
Democrats balk at Romney's pro-
posal.
Another so-called "Plan B"
would nail down at least 11 and
possibly 13 Republican congres-
sional seats. Rep. Henry Hogan
(R-Birmingham), chairman of the!
House Appropriations Committee,:
said, "If the Democrats don't want
to support the Romney plan, then
we will bring in this plan of our
own and attempt to pass it with-
out their votes."
Hogan added that Plan B is a,
House GOP proposal and has not
been endorsed by Romney as an
alternative.
In a brief meeting of Hogan's
committee, Democratic members
were unwilling to commit them-'
selves on the Romney proposal.
Hogan estimated that the Rom-.
ney lan would result in a split
of 10 Republicans and nine Dem-
ocrats, ",or even a 9-8 split witht
two "sing" districts in doubt.
Romney said Thursday that un-,
less anew districting plan is ap-
proved by April 24 the currente
1964 election schedule cannot beE
met.
In that case it is quite possiblet
that Michigan would have an at-t
large election in the fall, unlesst
Republicans in both houses can
muster a majority to pass a planI
of their own.t
The House GOP "Plan B" wouldr
rearrange the second district,t
which includes Ann Arbor. 1
Erhard Accepts1
Troop Removal
BONN (A')-Chancellor Ludwig
Erhard's government does not ob-
ject to the removal of some Unit-X
ed States troops from West Ger-c
many, a government statement i
said yesterday.
The statement was issued min-
utes after the Defense Depart-
ment in Washington announcedt
that U.S. Army units sent to this!
country in the 1961 Berlin crisis
are being returned to the Unitedl
States.

"The federal government was in--s
formed beforehand that the world-
wide obligations of the United
States make it necessary to trans-#

~portionment!

GEORGE ROMNEY

Court Gives{
Opinions As
Individuals E
Wait for Guidance
From Supreme Courtf
LANSING UIP) - The Michigan
Supreme Court - although still
looking hopefully to the United
States Supreme Court for guidance
-yesterday issued a series of in-
dividual opinions moving it a step
closer to a decision on legislative
apportionment.
There was no certain indica-
tion, from the opinions by individ-
ual justices, how the final deci-
sion would go. But they appeared
to strengthen the probability of a
"one man,'one vote" ruling.
It was in effect a 4-2 ruling in
favor of further postponement of a
decision on the validity of legisla-
tive districting plans submitted by
the Legislative Apportionment
Commission.
Further Delay
In two opinions, two Democratic
members of the court decided on
further delay of a final ruling and
a third, Justice Theodore Souris,
said he found the Senate appor-
tionment provisions of the State
Constitution unconstitutional.
Souris also rejected as unconsti-
tutional all four plans which had
been submitted to the court by
the bipartisan Legislative Appor-
tionment Commission.
Justices Paul Adams and Eugene
Black called for further postpone-
ment until after guidelines for a
ruling are established by the Unit-
ed States Supreme Court.E
'Pleased To Join'
Adams said, however, he would
be "pleased to join" with Souris if
and when the U.S. court lays down
a precedent. that follows Souris'
thinking.
Black assailed his fellow jus-
tices for what he termed "a head-
long rush" to make a decision
without waiting for the U.S. Su-
preme Court to show the way.
In the fourth opinion, Justice
Michael O'Hara joined his two Re-
publican colleagues on the court.
who ruled earlier the apportion-
ment plan devised by GOP mem-
bers of the State Apportionment
Commission "most accurately com-
plies" with the State Constitution.
O'Hara's declaration of position
put the court's three Republican,
members in support of the GOP
plan, with Souris and Kavanagh
the only Democrats expressing op-
position to it.

BRASILIA OP)--The new Brazil-
ian president to be elected by its
congress today is being cautioned
in advance that the antisubversiorn
act issued by the military "is dan-
gerously unconstitutional."
A hard-hit congress reacted yes-
terday with heated tempers and
a near brawl on the chamber poor
over the suspension of the politi-
cal rights of more than a score of
congressmen. At the same time,
United States officials privately
expressed growing concern over
the Brazilian military's departure
from constitutional procedures.
The military Thursday night is-
sued what it called an "institu-
tional act" which suspended poli-
tical rights and revoked mandates
of federal, state and municipal
legislators without recourse to the
courts.
It also ordered the congress to
meet within two days to elect a
new president to serve until de-
posed Joao Goulart's term tech-
nically expires 20 months from
now.
The negative reaction flowed in
quickly today from U.S. and Bra-
zilian capitals.
In Brasilia, two deputies spoke
up strongly against the antisubver-
sion act. One deputy threw his
credentials on the chamber chair-
man's table in protest. When the
chairman started reading a list of
substitute deputies the session had.
to be ended as wild shoving and
shouting broke out.
The act "could be a highly dan-
gerous instrument in the hands of
a bad president," one newspaper
said in a front-page column. It
expressed hope that the new chief
executive will use the extraordi-
nary powers only for the nation's
welfare.
Latin Americanssources in
Washington were also anxiously
awaiting today's election to see if
it reflects a triumph of ultra-con-
servative influences.
The front-running candidate for
Brazil's presidency is the former
army chief of staff, General Hum-
berto Castello Blanco.
Meanwhile, in Venezuela, the
government is doing some soul
searching on the question of main-
taining diplomatic relations with
Brazil, where the military threw
out President Joao Goulart last
week.
Having had its own long and
painful experience with dictator-
ship, Venezuela has maintained an
ironclad policy of refusing to
recognize regimes arising from mil-
itary coups.
Some foreign ministry officials
say Brazil followed the constitu-
tional line of successors and Goul-
art himself, in effect, resigned by
leaving the country for Uruguay
without .asking permission of con-
gress.
Others say President Raul Leoni
should observe the policy that has
denied recognition of revolutionary
governments in other South Amer-
ican countries.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
sixth in a series of seven articles
dealing with the Negro in Atlanta,
The reporter, although not a native
Southerner, has lived in that city
for five years.
By ROBERT JOHNSTON
special to The Daily
ATLANTA-The Greater Atlan-
ta Council on Human Relations
has attempted over the last several
years of its existence to provide
an organized basis for the city's
civil rights movement.
The council is a private organi-
zation financed through contribu-
tions from its members. Mrs. Clif-
ton Hoffman, chairman, has ex-
plained that the council tries to'
use the resources of the group-
and the individuals who compose
it-to help to remove the segrega-
tional barrers.
Once this can be accomplished,
the group seeks to provide op-
portunities and encouragement for
individuals to participate in an
integrated society. She observes
that "the old familiar patterns of
organization do not always fit
social change. This work is some-
times exhausting but always excit-
ing."
Totals Projects
The council has tabulated its
projects in 1963. It distributed
35,000 anti-discrimination stickers,
prepared a list of Atlanta's in-
tegrated facilities, published an
"Equal Opportunity Employer"!
directory, and assisted in desegre-
gation efforts for schools, theatres,
employment, health and social
services.
Many programs have been plan-
ned for 1964: headed by a project
of community education on open
occupancy. There will also be in-
tensified urban renewal work; as-
sistance with school transfer ap-
plications in systems in the metro-
politan area; implementation of
programs to extend merit employ-
ment and filling of requests for as-
sistance- from office.s and groups1
planning for desegregation.
Mrs. Eliza Pascal (white) is
executive director of the council.
Her position is maintained by the!
Unitarian - Universalist Service!
Committee. .
Declaration Needed
"A declaration of acceptance
and of implementation of dese-
gregation is needed. This first
step has been undertaken. The im-
plementation has not. Atlanta has
achieved some desegregation but
only what the city has been push-
ed into," she said. "However, one
thing encourages another."
Mrs. Pascal explained the degree
of commitment thus far obtained1
from the white citizenry, "The

liberal whites have based their
stand on law and order. They have
avoided the issue of desegregation.
Every step has been the smallest
possible and based on what the
people had to do, not what they
thought was right."
Three floors above the Atlanta
Council's office in the same build-
ing in downtown Atlanta are the
considerable headquarters offices
of the Southern Region Council.1

The Southern Regional Council
publishes many comprehensive
studies of the Negro movement
and its results and puts out a
bimonthly magazine "The New
South." Three of its studies are
"Albany, A Study in National Re-
sponsibility," "School Desegrega-
tion, The First Six Years". and
"The Economic Status of Negroes
in the Nation and in the South."
Two studies have been published

token integration concept, its a
complishments, rationale and ":
nancial and human" costs.
" A companion to this study
"The Desegregation of Souther
Schools, A Psychiatric Study"
Dr. Robert Coles. The author co
cludes with a recommendation f
"the closest study of the desegr
gated school by all of those i
terested in the welfare of Amer
can children. The more speci
the information we accumula
about specific situations and co
ditions, the better prepared we wi
be to apply this knowledge to ni
and often unique as well as simil
crises or events."
Other biracial groups in Atlan
have endorsed or been a part
the Negro moveme t. Ralph M
Gill, Atlanta Constitution publis:
er, discussed the position of t:
churches in this "Bible Belt" cit
"The clergy have not been too a
tive here," he said, "but have be
far ahead of those in the rest
the South. About 90 ministe
signed a manifesto several yea
ago which supported desegreg
tion moves. Four major ministe
did not sign."
Recently Integrated
The congregation of the Atlan
First Baptist Church recently v
ed to integrate their worship ser
ices. This move followed a seni
of demonstrations directed at tl
church's policy of seating Negro
and whites separately.
J. Edward Lantz, area represei
tative of the National Council
Churches said, "The churches a
very much involved and are wor
ing toward integration program
Most denominational bodies ha
taken strong .,anti - segregati
stands, and many state groui
have followed."

-Associated Press
NEGRO WOMAN is being arrested at a sit-in demonstration pro-
testing restaurant segregation in Atlanta. Public demonstrations
have played a major part in securing desegregation of many of
the city's public and private facilities.

While this council's activities do
not usually affect Atlanta directly,
its leadership is based in the city
and thus plays a part in the local
events.
Publicize the Movement
One of its principal activities is
the preparation and distribution
of a great deal of literature con-
cerning the rights movement in,
the South. One of these publica-
tions, a one year summary of civil
rights activities, states at the be-
ginning, "During 1963 an estimat-
ed 930 individual public protest
demonstrations took place in at
least 115 cities in the 11 Southern
states. More than 20,000 of the
persons who have demonstrated
have been arrested. Ten persons
have died under circumstances
directly related to racial protests.
And 35 known bombings have oc-
curred.
"On the positive side some prog-
ress toward integration has been
taken in an estimated 186 locali-
ties in the 11 Southern states. Bi-
racial committees are working in
100 of these cities." Complete de-.
tails of all these happenings are
listed in the report.

in cooperation with the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. In "Southern Schools,
Token Integration and Beyond,"
Prof. J. Kenneth Morland of
Randolph-Macon Woman's Col-
lege, Lynchburg, Va., explores the

STUDENTS

0 0.0'

STANLEY THAYER

The deadline for payment
on all

1,

World News,
Roundup.
By The Associated Press
SAIGON, Viet Nam-Commu-
nist guerrillas faded into hiding
south of Saigon last night after
killing more than 50 Vietnamese
soldiers and a United States pilot
in two days of bloody attacks.-
Three other Americans were
wounded in fighting that brought
the war to this capital's doorstep.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Sen. Jack Mill-
er (R-Iowa) deplored yesterday
any talk that failure to pass the
pending civil rights bill may lead
to bloodshed and expressed hope
there will be "no more statements
of that kind" in the Senate.
But Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore)
promptly answered that while he
thinks Negroes "will make a great
mistake if they take their cause to
the streets," this will not lead
him to "stick my head in the
sand ... and not say what I think
is inevitable if we do not deliver
the full constitutional rights to
the Negroes."
SAN DIEGO-A close political
advisor said yesterday he thinks
United States Ambassador Henry
Cabot Lodge will return from his
post in South Viet Nam in June to
campaign for the Republican pres-
idential nomination.
*
JACKSON, Miss.-A Mississippi
delta farmer testified yesterday
the rifle believed used to kill a
Negro integration leader here was
identical in every respect to one
he traded Byron de la Beckwith.
Beckwith, a 43-year-old white
salesman, is on trial for the sec-
ond time in the ambush slaying of
Medgar Evers last June 12.{

SUBSCRIPTIONS
CLASSIFIED ADS,

,

DISPLAY

ADS

1

Is noon

TODAY

ii

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TWO-BEDROOM APTS.-500 yds. from Union.
New, luxurious, carpeted, furnished,
free air-conditioning, full kitchens, parking.
AVAILABLE FOR JUNE AND SEPTEMBER
Misco Mgt. Service, 665-7332, 320 E. Madison
Open Evenings 7-9 ... Apt. No. 9

I

Grades will be withheld
on ALL accounts that

remain unpaid

L

WESLEY WOLGAMOT AND D A C
PRESENT
X. J. KENNEDY
READING AND SINGING FROM HIS OWN POETRY
TONIGHT AT 8:30
WESLEY FOUNDATION LOUNGE
ADMISSION 90c

1l

S,= _. w

i,

CONCERT IN JAZZ
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN JAZZ
BAND
CLARENCE BYRD TRIO
RICHARD LOWENTHAL QUARTET
STUART APTEKAR QUINTET
SUNDAY, APRIL 19-7:00 P.M.
Michigan Union Ballroom Admission 50 cents
Sponsored by the Michigan Union

I

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and theI
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North DivisionI
Phone NO 2.4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
1 1:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.

h I&
rIl
FIRST CHURCH
SCIENTIST

AA

T(0

clJiRH

OF CHRIST

1833 Washtenow Ave.
For transportation call NO 8-7048.
9:30 a.m Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m. Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 am. to 5nd0 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

ten U.S. units numbering about 7,'7
500 men from Berlin to the United MOSCOW-The United States
States," the statement said. reacted sharply if belatedly yes-
___ terday to travel restrictions im-
posed by the Soviet government
JUST FOR LAUGHS on four United States embassy
attaches.
TAKE HER TO SEE The embassy said it has protest-
ed and denied Russian charges
that the four had engaged in im-
Romranopoper activities outside Moscow.

I

11

- - - - a a a a a

I' &
Juliet..
before someone
else does!
"Funny, like a comedy should be"
An Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
Presentation"
at

T USEV Invites Yon
to came to
MICIIIGRAS
FANTASTIC FRIDAY
PARADE
featuring
A REAL LIVE
PLAYBOY BUNNY
IM TIu C CLI

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11 :00 a.m.

Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Ave.
NO 2.4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Jonssen.'
SUNDAY

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
NO 2-4536
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 o.m.-
"Rebel Without a Cause"-Dr. Rupert. -
10:15 a.m.-Seminar,Pine Room, "Major Re-
Iig ions of the World-Hinduism."
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Muhammad Fakhri will speak on
"Basic Concepts of Islam."
TUESDAY
8:30-11:00 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast, Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. sup-
per followed by Dr. Rupert's illustrated talk
on his recent trip to Ethiopia and Palestine.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. - Services,
Sermon by Pastor, "Applied Christianity."
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program, with election of next year's offi-
cers.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service and Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Speaker: The Rev. Patrick Mur-

11

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