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April 05, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ihigan Opens Spring Football Drills

KINGERY LEADS BLUE:

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T ankers Place Four in AAU

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By LLOYD GRAFF
The sharp pop of shoulder pad
hitting shoulder pad was mixed
with grunts, whistles and words
as eighty football players and
eight coaches began the formal
ritei of spring football practice
yesterday.
In crisp 40-degree weather
Coach Bump Elliott and his crew
started the bumping and belting
routine which is said to make
athletes into football players. In
the spring, Elliott says he gets
a chance to look over his new
material and check over the vet-
erans. He feels he has an op-
portunity to do more individual
coaching than in the fall because
time pressure is not as great.
New Line Coach
Saturday's practice sessionlast-
ed about two and a half hours
and was devoted almost entirely
to drills. The interior linemen had
a chance to see how new coach
TonyeMason from Niles, Ohio,
operates.
Mason, who carries a lot of
starch on a 5'8" frame, kept up
an almost continuous stream of
words, as he gave his linemen a

stiff workout. He chewed on a big
wad of tobacco all the time.
In the first lineups, Chuck
Ruzicka and Greg Mader are
listed as Blue team tackles with
Charlie Kines and Tom Mack
behind them on the White team.
Blue and White are analogous to
first and second team. Dave Butler
and Rich Hahn are the Blue
gua'rds while Bill Keating; younger
brother of graduating Tom Keat-
ing, and John Marcum are work-
ing with the White team at that
position.
Stiff Competition
At the center spot, where a tre-
mendous battle might be shaping
up, Elliott lists Brian Patchen
who came on dramatically last
season on the Blue team with
Tom tecchini, who showed bril-
liance before he was injured, on
the Whites. Frank Nunley, a

highly-touted sophomore, is on the
Gold third team at center.
Working on the first team at
end were captain Jim Conley and
Bill Laskey. John Henderson de-
cided to go out for track as did
other football candidates, Bill
Yearby, John Rowser, Dick Wells,
and Dorie Reed. Tall Steve Smith,
the tallest man on the squad at
6'5", is on the second team at end,
as is Craig Kirby who distinguish-
ed himself as a pass receiver late
last season.
Backfield Men
Jack Clancy is listed as first-
string left'halfback with big Jim
Detweiler, a 205 pound freshman,
backing him up. Bob Quist is run-
ning at right half for the Blues
with Ton Brigstock and Richard
Ott playing for the Whites. Carl
Ward, a 5'9" speedball, is now

listed on the third string gold
team.
Bob Timberlake, to nobody's sur-.
prise, was the Blue quarterback
with sophomore Pete Hollis play-
ing for the White team. Dick Vid-
mer, a freshman, is on the Gold
team.
Completing the backfield is Mel
Anthony at fullback with Chuck
Dehlin toiling for the White team.
"The boys on the team are in
good condition, but not great,"
Elliott said after the workout. He
did, however, express satisfaction
with the way practice went.
Meanwhile, other Big Ten
teams have been having the same
weather trouble as Michigan.
Heavy snows threw Northwest-
ern's practice opening a week be-
hind time, and Purdue, as Mich-
igan, was two days late in begin-
ning to work out.

Soudek Breaks, Mark in Opepner

By The Associated Press
Michigan placed four swimmers
in the finals of the Men's AAU
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships, but their highest finish was
a fourth place by freshman Russ
Kingery in, the 100-yard back-
stroke.
Pan American Games gold medal
winner Ed Bartsch was fifth, :00.2
behind Kingery. Bob Bennett of
Southern California was first with
a time of :53.7. Kingery's time
was :54.5.
Wolverine f r e s h m a n Paul
Scheerer was fifth in the 100-
yard breaststroke only :00.6 be-
hind the winner. Scheerer placed
sixth in the 200-yard breaststroke
Friday.
Richard Walls, double winner
in the Big Ten Championships,
was sixth in the 100-yard free-
style. His time of :49.3 and sixth-
place finish qualifies him for the
Olympic trials to be held this sum-
mer.
High school senior Don Schol-
lander set his second American
record in two days in winning the
500-yard freestyle in 4:44.5. Roy
Saari, the former record holder,
was second, 13 yards behind. It
was the second time during the
AAU meet that the NCAA triple-
winner finished -behind Schollan-
der.
Another high school sensation,
Dick Roth, a Santa Clara team-
mate of Schollander, set his sec-
ond American record in tne 200-
yard individual medley with a time
of 1:58.2. Chet Jastremski, former
Indiana star, held the old record
of 1:58.5. Jastremski did not com-
pete in this meet.
In the 100-yard freestyle, Steve
Clark, a former member of the
Santa Clara team, and presently

swimming for Yale University, beat
defending champion Steve Jack-
man. Clark's time was :47.1.
The closest race of the evening
was the 100-yard breaststroke
which was won by NCAA cham-
pion Bill Craig of Southern Cali-
fornia with a time of 1:00.1. Only,
:00.6 separated the winner and
fifth place winner, Scheerer. Ja-
Carr BreaKs
Mark; Long
Sets Another
By The Associated Press
Henry Carr, Arizona State's flash
of lightning, bettered his own
world record for the 220-yard dash
around a curve last night with a
time of :20.2.
This time knocks :00.1 off his
listed record. The tall junior from
Detroit set the record in a dual
meet betweeAi the Sun Devils and
the Southern California Striders.
Second and third spots went to
Striders Adolph Plummer and Don
Webster in times of .:20.8 and :20.9,
respectively. Plummer is a world
record holder in the 440-yard dash.
Another world's record was
broken in a meet between Occi-
dental College and the Pasadena
Athletic Association when Dallas
Long of Southern Cal heaved the
shot put 65'111/2" to erase his old
mark by one inch.
Long's series of six throws meas-
ured between 63'11/2" to the new
mark he established on his fifth
put,

pan's Kenjiro Matsumoto, win-
ner of the 200-yard breaststroke
Friday was timed just behind
Craig, but placed third behind Ken
Merten on a judge's decision.
American record holder Wally
Richardson set a meet mark of
:50.8 in the 100-yard butterfly.
World record holder Luis Nicolao
of Argentina, was second by a
yard. In the NCAA meet last week-
end, Richardson was timied in
:50.2.
Ken Sitzberger, Indiana Uni-
versity freshman, scored 66.15
points on each of his last two
diver to become the first college
freshman ever to win an indoor
AAU three-meter diving title. He
finished 20.75 ahead of defending
Rick Gilbert of Indiana, whom
he also unseated for the one-
meter title.

BUMP ELLIOTT

ELD HOUSE:

To Pattern New Arena
After UCLA Structure

r 1

(Continued from Page 1)
it rock solid enough to support
ie building.
Slush and Sand.
Other sites, like the Wines Field
cation, had as much as 60 feet
slush and sand on top of the
ck base.
The only interference which the
iosen site will have with current
cilities is that it will uproot the
olf practice field, where golf
asses have been held.
Other areas under consideration
ould have required far more dis-
cation of facilities, according to
purr.
Each of the four other sites,
though all closer to the campus
Ian the one decided upon, would
ave required some major dis-
cation of present 'facilities, or
ould have interfered with the
ng-range expansion plans of
te athletic board.
To Build Walkways
Dean Spurr says that the com-
ittee took into account the dis-
,nce which the site is from the
tinpus, but explains that walk-
ays will be built out to the loca-
on, and that the distance is less
an a mile from the Union.
"We are considering bus service
om the more distant parts of the
mpus, -Spurr says.
The new building will cost about
.5 million and will be financed
ztirely out of athletic department
inds. The athletic board will
>at a bond issue which will be
iaranteed by the Office of Busi-
ss and Finance.
The building itself will be pat-
reed after the UCLA Sports

Building, a $3.5 million arena
seating 13,500, which is currently
under construction. in Los Angeles.
Dan Dworsky, a former Michigan
All-American, is one of the archi-
tects for the UCLA project.
Dworsky along with Kenneth
Black and Associates of Lansing,
is in charge of the plans for the
Michigan building.
"Dan has access to all the plans
for the UCLA building, and we
hope he'll be able to' profit from
their mistakes," Dean Spurr says.

Special To The Dailyv
LEXINGTON, Ky. - Michigan's
Ernie Soudek set a varsity record'
in the discus with a heave of
177'6" yesterday as the Big Ten
indoor track champion Wolverines
opened their outdoor season in
the Kentucky Relays.
Soudek, a 6'6" senior from
Vienna, Austria, was second in the
Big Ten as a sophomore, but
failed to place last year when he
fouled on all his attempts.
He broke his own record by
two inches with a hurl that assist-
ant track coach Dave Martin call-
ed "one of the best throws in the
country this year."
No Predictions
Soudek's best throw last year
also came in the opening meet of
the year. After that meet, the 230-
pound former hammer thrower
predicted throws upwards of 180',
but this year he says that he
won't make any predictions.
Soudek, who will probably rep-
resent his native Austria in the
Olympics, was the only winner for
the Wolverines as only part of the
team made the trip.
Other placers included Big Ten
champion shot putter Roger Sch-
mitt, who placed second with a
throw of 53'1%".
Kelly Anchors
The two-mile relay team of
Dave Hayes, Jay Sampson, Cecil
Norde and Ted Kelly was third.
Kelly ran an anchor leg in the
event in a time of 1:52.8.
Cliff Nuttall, last year's high
hurdles champion in the Big Ten,
placed fourth in the 120-yard ver-
sion of his event, but was clocked
in :14.2, :00.1 better than his

winning performance in Minne-
9polis last spring in the Big Ten
outdoor meet.
Chris Murray was fourth in the
two-mile with 9:22 and was fifth
in the mile.
Ammerman Third
In the high jump, Michigan's
surprise indoor champion, Al Am-
merman, took a-third with a leap
of 6'6", two inches below his win-
ning jump last month in the Big
Ten meet.
In the closest race of the day,
Kentucky's John Cox and Mel
Blenheim and Randall Weddle of
Indiana were all timed in :21.5 in
the 220-yard dash.
Bob Schul of Miami (Ohio)
coasted to victory in the two-mile
run, breaking the tape in 8:47.3.
Chicago's Willie May captured the
120-yard high hurdles in :14.3.
The track team returns to Ann
Arbor and is idle until the Ohio
State Relays, a week from Satur-
day, April 18.

SPORT
in the USSR
Monthly from the Soviet Union.
In English. Richly illustrated.
About all 'sports in Soviet Un-
ion, including system of train-
ing.
One year subscription--
40 Cents
Imported Publications & Prod.
1 Union Euare, N.Y.C. 3 (M)
IU

WHAT'S
ON
THE

ERNIE SOUDEK

CAZZIE SCORELESS:
AAU Stars Triumph
In Final Cage Tryouts

Scores
PRO HOCKEY
Stanley Cup Playoffs
Montreal 4, Toronto 2
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Iowa 10-23, Luther 0-0
Indiana 2-9, DePauw 0-3
Arizona State 4-13, Utah State 2-2
TENNNS
Ohio State 7, Cincinnati 2
Miami 9, Cornell 0
Indiana 8, Washington (St. Louis) 0
OLYMPIC BASKETBALL TRIALS
NCAA Blues 75, AAU Stripes 67
AAU stars 78, NCAA Reds 73
NAIA All-Stars 84, NCAA Whites 77
Armed Forces Jets 95, Armed Forces
Missiles 90

I

_f
e. .
III. $ 4. ....

I1,

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Olympic
basketball trials are over and all
that remains is today's announce-
ment of selections of the 12-man
team and six alternates by the se-
lections committee.
In last night's action, the AAU
Stars won the winner-take-nothing
tournament by downing the NCAA
Red 'team, 78-U~. In the third
place game, the NAIA All-Stars
beat the NCAA Whites, 84-77.
Cazzie Russell, playing for the
Whites was held scoreless, but saw
enough action to commit two per-
sonal fouls.
UCLA's Blues
In action yesterday afternoon,
the NCAA Blues, composed mostly

ichigan Ends Winter Sports
SOverall Conference Leader

of UCLA's national champions,
walked past the AAU Stripes 75-
67 for fifth place and the Armed
Forces Jets downed the Armed
Forces Missiles, 95-90 for seventh.
The AAU Stars, led by Jerry,
Shipp and little Larry Brown up-
set the favored NCAA team. Shipp
led the AAU scoring with 16 points,
many on soft hooks from the cor-
ner, while Brown clinched the vic-
tory with his free throw shooting
in the closing minutes.
Skurcenski Stars
Lanky Lou Skurcenski led the
NAIA All-Stars with 22 points.
The 6'6" senior from Westminster,
Pa., received major support from
All-American Lucius Jackson of
Pan American College.
Jackson, a 6'9" giant, scored 14
points but led the team in re-
bounds with 14.
Outstanding for the Whites was
Joe Caldwell of Arizona State who
dumped in 18 and little Manny
Newsome of Western Michigan
who collected 12. Leslie Hunter of
Loyola pumped in 10 for the los-
ers.
Mullins Nets 16
In the championship game, Jeff
Mullins of Duke spearheaded a
last-ditch rally by the NCAA Reds,
but his team couldn't catch up.
Mullins topped all scorers with 16.
Mel Counts, Oregon State's giant
center threw in 14 and Jim (Bad
News) Barnes had 13. Pete McCaf-
frey had 15 for the AAU squad.
Barry Kramer led the NCAA
Blue team with 19 in its conquest
over the Armed Forces Jets.
Eh t B bn-hl-

During the fall and wintery
ports seasons, Michigan's var-
ty teams established the greatest
cord in Wolverine history by
inning or sharing in five of
ven Big Ten titles.
To top this off, the hockey team
aptured the NCAA crown, and
her teams accounted for two
iirds, a fourth, and a sixth in
ational championship competi-
on. The Maize and Blue basket-
all and gymnastics teams each
nished third in NCAA finals,
hile the tankers wound up fourth

and the matmen were sixth.
Both the hockey and basketball
teams compiled the best records in
Michigan's history, finishing with
24-4-1 and 23-5, respectively.
This marks the fourth consecu-
tive season in which Michigan has
led the Big Ten in titles won dur-
ing this period.
Below are the places in which
the Big Ten teams finished in
each sport. The average is taken
from the finish of each school in
each sport:

Wolverine Frosh Gymnasts
Sparkle in Association Meet

Ij Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING-In the Mich-
igan Gymnastics Association Meet
yesterday, Michigan coach Newt
Loken said t h a t Michigan's
"freshmen performed well.
All competitors in the meet were
freshmen, performing unattached.
Loken pointed out that there were
upwards of 20 men in each event,
"pretty good competition."
A trio of Michigan freshmen
swept the first three places in the
parallel bars. Gary VanderVoort
won, with Ken Williams and Kim
Mousseau right behind.
Twins
In floor exercise, a pair of
twins, Charles and Phil Fuller,
placed third and fourth. Follow-
ing them in fifth position was
Chris VanDenBroek.
Michigan frosh placed fourth,
fifth and sixth on the side horse.
Finishing in these places were
Walt Knelde, Cliff Chilver and
Art Baessler.
On the high bar, VanderVoort
racked up his second first, while
VanDenBroek tooka second. Chil-
ver finished fourth in the event.
Still Rings
VanderVoort grabbed a second
on the still rings, with Clarence
Eagle finishing behind him. Chil-
ver took a fourth in this event
also.
The only other event in which

a Michigan freshman placed was
vaulting where Phil Fuller fin-
ished third.
VanDenBroek, VanderVoort and
Chilver placed second, third and
fourth in all-around competition.
Their respective scores were 469,
464, and 444, compared to a win-
ning total of 477 for Flint Junior
College's Bob F'riend.
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS!
-5 Barbers to serve you-
at
U-M Barbers
N. Univ. near Kresge's
and
--7 Barbers to serve you-
at
The' Dascola Barbers
near Mich. Theater

7

Champions of the West

1. MICHIGAN
2. Michigan State'
3. Minnesota
4. Ohio State
5. Wisconsin
6. llinois
7. indiana
8. Iowa
9. Purdue
L. Northwestern

5
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I

Cincinnati 7, Los Angeles (N) 6
Pittsburgh 14, Detroit 6
New York (A) 9, Chicago (A) 8
Philadelphia 9, Houston 6
St. Louis 10, New York (N) 1
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 4
Washington 3, Milwaukee 2

11

1.7
3.7
4.6
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.8
6.0
6.1
6.0

f-Indicates tied for place.
*-means did not compete.

Camp To-Ho-Ne for Boys,

use itrro?
(Teyd probably left *30so fbef heads),
But then, wouldn't any man? If he suddenly
found all those starry-eyed gals looking at him?
So, if you think you can handle it, go
ahead. use SHORT CUT! It'll tame the

T

GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS.

OPENINGS FOR COUNSELORS:

General, some key per-

sonnel, tennis, archery, photography. Aquatics, men includ-
ing: WSI's, smallcraft, waterskiing. Wood-metal shop. Cer-
...,,....... A -An - vestla.+a riiie v j re- nA M/##N. rl

:..c.+',x'v::, ..."..,': ''". :;. *..>' <?i<' k4" ;
. :. ..:ih::v:" }f: y; i $::;. :ifi.. , i,' .:" .* i . ._

SET?

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