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April 02, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,

THE MCHIGA DAIY THUSDAY

ussell Bids for Olympic Journey

BRINGS WINNING RECORD:
Mason Assumes Offensive Lie Dutes

By TOM WEINBERG
It seems strange to play in a
basketball tournament when it
doesn't matter if you win or lose.
But that's exactly what Michi-
gan's All-American Cazzie Rus-
sell and a handful of the nation's
best amateurs are doing in New
York today, tomorrow and Satur-
day.
It's the tryouts for the Olympic
team to represent the United
States and only 12 players from
the galaxy of 96 stars will be se-i
lected. The selections are made
entirely on an individual basis and
the team which wins the three-,
day tournament doesn't automat-
ically qualify anyone for the
Olympics. -%
By Committee
The selections are made by the
20-member Olympic Selections
Committee. The coach of the
Olympic squad, Henry Iba of
Oklahoma State, is not a member
of the selecting committee, but
will be on hand. for all the games
at St. Johns University and will
make recommendations to the
committee. In addition to the 12

regular
a group
chosen.

menibers of the squad,
of six alternates will be

The teams which are competing
in the tournament are smatter-
ings of the elite from every divi-
sion of amateur basketball. There
are a total of eight all-star teams
--three from the NCAA, one from
the National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics (NAIA), two
from the AAU, and two from the
armed services.
NCAA To Dominate
The NCAA representatives are
expected to dominate the selec-
tions, both individually and as a
group. The NCAA teams are called
the Whites, Reds and Blues. The
first two are all-star teams, com-
posed of players from all over the
country.
The third squad, the Blues, has
six players from national cham-
pion UCLA plus a few other play-
ers Barry .Kramer, NYU; Jerry
Sloan, Evansville; Jim Davis, Col-
orado; Ollie Johnson, San Fran-
cisco; and Bennie Lennox, Texas
A & M.
Russell's team, the Whites,
boasts the following collegiate
stars: Cincinnati's Ron Bonham;
Paul Silas of Creighton; Leslie
Hunter of Loyola; Manny New-
some of Western Michigan; Steve
Thomas of Xavier; Doug Moon of
Utah; Billy Cunningham from
Carolina; Fred Hetzel of David-
son; Joe Caldwell of Arizona
State; and Cotton Nash of Ken-
tucky.
Bad News?
The third NCAA entry has
Wally Jones, Villanova; Howard
Komives, Bowling Green; Jeff'
Mullins of Duke; Dave Stallworth,
Wichita; Bill Bradley, Princeton;
Willie Murrell, Kansas State; Rick
Barry, Miami; Wayne Estes, Utah
State; Ray Carey, Missouri; John
Thompson, Providence; Mel

Counts, Oregon State; and Jim
(Bad News) Barnes, Texas West-
ern.
The players representing the
small colleges of the NAIA in-
clude the two stars from Pan
American, Lucius Jackson and
Mitchell Edwards; two from
Grambling, Willis Reed and Wil-
bert Frazier; two from the NAIA
champions, Rockhurst of Kansas
City, Pat Caldwell and Ralph Tel-
ken; Willie Shaw from Lane;
Jesse Branson of Elon; Lou Skur-
censki, Westminster, Pa.; Doug
Glaysher from Emporia State;
Cecil Tuttle, Georgetown, Ky., and
Jerry Moore of Morris Harvey.
All the members of the NAIA
all-star squad are on the Little
All-America team, in the same
way that those from the NCAA
are mentioned for All-American
teams.
The top players from the AAU
are Larry Brown and 71" Mike
McCoy from Akron and Larry
Pursiful of Bartletsville. Those
who will represent the armed
forces on their all-star squad in-
clude Al Saunders, formerly of
Bradley, representing the Army.
Air Force players on the service
team are Ken Piehette and Don
Lotz.
Russell's Ankle
Russell, who has been suffer-
ing from an ankle injury for
about five weeks since a freak
collision with teammate Bob Can-
trell at Madison, still is ham-
pered by the sore ankle.
Michigan assistant coach Jim
Skala said last night that he saw
Russell play at Kentucky Tues-
day and that he was far from
playing one hundred per cent.
Skala explained that Russell nev-
er had bone chips in his ankle,
as was common knowledge, but
that. the injury was an inflam-
niation of his ankle capsule. The
coach said that the confusion
with the bone chips came when
the doctors diagnosed that Rus-
sell had bona spurs, a common
injury, to athlet es.
"All Cazzie really needs is about
a month of rest," the coach said.
"But he just hasn't had the
chance, with the NCAA's and now
the exhibitions with the Oiympic
team.'

If Russell aces make the Olym-
pic team, there remains doubt as
to how much he'll be allowed to
play next year. "He wouldn't Cr -
roll the first semester," SkaA said.
"No one knows right now if he'd
be eligible for the holiday tourna-
ment in New York. We'll cross
that bridge when we come to it,"
Skala added.
The question of eligibility will
eventually have to be resolved by
the Big Ten, but if Michigan eli-
gibility rules are used, Russell
would become eligible immediate-
ly after the close of the first se-
mester. This would make him eli-
gible for the New York tourna-
ment, although ineligible for the
first few warmup games in De-
cember.

By BILL BULLARD
Acting Sports Editor
Tony Mason, Michigan's new
assistant football coach, moves
into the collegiate coaching ranks
after compiling one of the most
outstanding records in the history
of Ohio high school football.
Mason fills a vacancy caused by
the resignation of offensive line
coach Jack Fouts. The former
Wolverine mentor is now head
coach at his alma mater, Ohio
Wesleyan.
The announcement of Mason's
appointment was made last week
during vacation. Mason has been
in Ann Arbor for several days
now, being briefed on the person-
nel he will tutor in spring prac-
tice and generally settling down
to his new duties.

In 1953 Mason began a coaching
career in which his teams were
undefeated in seven of 11 seasons.
His overall record is 87 wins, nine
losses,and seven ties.
At Brookfield (O.) High School,

teams are now on the Michigan
varsity.
Mason's proteges now at Michi-
gan are last season's starting
right halfback Dick Rindfuss,
tackle Chuck Kines, end Dennis
Flanagan, freshman quarterback
Jim Seiber, and tough-luck half-'
back Rick Sygar.
Mason's only connection with,
Michigan before accepting the job
here, are these players. His only
previous visit to Ann Arbor was
last May to watch the annual
spring intrasquad football game.
After four undefeated seasons
at McKinley, Mason says he de-
cided to accept the Michigan of-
fer because, "I think Bump El-
liott is a great coach and Michi-
gan is a great University. If the
coaches here were able to recruit
five of my boys, then it wasn't
too difficult to recruit me."
Ready
Mason said Elliott contacted
him in Atlantic City, N. J., where
he was speaking to a convention
of coaches on March 16. Elliott
offered him the job and he ac-
cepted immediately, according to
Mason.
This speaking engagement was
not at all unusual for Mason. In
1963, he gave 70 speeches to vari-
ous groups and he has already
given 48 speeches so far this year.
Besides his coaching job in Ohio,
Mason worked as a public rela-
tions' consultant.

This background should help
in his new recruiting assignment
which is his home area of East-
ern Ohio and Western kensyl-
vania. End coach Jocko Nelson
will take 'over Fouts' old respon-
sibility in the Dayton-Cincinnati
region.
Elliott says the interior line is
one of the areas that will have
to be worked on this spring and
fall. "I've met some of the boys
that will be playing on the line
for me already," Mason says. "We
want hitters--and I think they
are."
As a lineman, Mason earned
four letters at Clarion (Pa.)
Teachers College in the late 40's.
"As a head coach, I've had to
know all areas of the game," Ma-
son comments. "But I think any
coach can do a better job if he is
allowed to specialize."
Elliott's staff is now at full
strength. Besides Mas6n and Nel-
son, the group consists of off en-
sive backfield and offensive coach
Hanke Fonde, defensive line and
defensive coach Bob Hollway, de-
fensive;backfieldcoach D.on Du-
fek, and freshman coach Dennis
Fitzgerald.

4

STARS IN BARTLESVILLE:
Tankers in A AU Meet;
Farley To Stay Home'

I

TONY MASON

:antrell

SIgns
Michigan's basketball Captain
Bob Cantrell is losing little time
in putting his basketball skills to
monetary advantage.
Cantrell, who was the playmak-
ing guard in the vaunted Wolver-
ine attack, signed a 1964-65 con-
tract with the Grand Rapid Tack-
ers of the Midwest Basketball
League it was announced yester-
day.
Tuesday it was announced that
the 5'11" guard had also signed
to play with the United States
Stars against the Harlem Globe-
trotters last night.
Other members of the stars team
were Jerry Harkness of Chicago
Loyola and George Bork, Little
All - America quarterback from
Northern Illinois.

By MIKE MEYERS
Several Wolverine swimmers and
divers join America's top swim
stars, as the AAU meet gets under
way today in Bartlesville, Okla-
homa.
The first six American per-
formers in each event earn the
right to go to the Olympic trials
in New York in August.
Missing the. meet, however, will
be Michigan distance freestyler
Bill Farley, who decided to re-
main in Ann Arbor.
Representing Michigan in the
diving events will be Ed Booth-
man, who placed second at both
the one and three meter boards
in the NCAA's last week; John
Candler, who placed fifth at one
meter and seventh at three meter;
and Greg Shuff, a freshman from
California.
For sprinter Rich Walls, a na-
tive of Bartlesville, the trip is a
homecoming.
Backstroker Ed Bartsch, NCAA
champion in 1963 and third place

finisher this year, and distance
man Tom Dudley round out the
varsity entries.
In addition to Shuff, several of
Michigan's great freshman team
are making the trip. Foremost
among them is Carl Robie who
holds the world record in the
200-meter butterfly. Sprinter Bill
Groft, backstroker Russ Kingery,
breaststroker Paul Scheerer, and
individualhmedleyist John Vry
complete the group.
All Michigan swimmers will be
competing unattached in the meet.

his five-season mark was 40-6-1.
The forty wins included a 28-
game victory string and three un-
defeated se'asons.
Mason then moved to Niles (O.)
McKinley High School where he
developed one of the top prep
teams in the nation. His last four
squads have been undefeated. The
1963 and 1961 teams were rated
state champions. In 1960 and
1962, his squads were ranked sec-
ond in the state.
Mason's six-year record at Mc-
Kinley was 47-3-6. The. school
presently has a 47-game winning
streak.
Five players from Mason's

11

Scores
BASEBALL
Wisconsin 5, Arizona St. Univ. 3
Purdue 3, Ball State 2
TENNIS
Michigan State 5, Geo. Washington 4

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Exhibition Baseball
Milwaukee 5, Chicago "B" (A) 3
Los Angeles (N) 7, Minnesota 3
Los Angeles (A) 10, San Francisco 7
Baltimore 4, Pittsburgh 0
New York (A) 4, Detroit 2
New York (N) 3, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 6, Philadelphia 5
Chicago "A" (A)' 12, Washington 7

11

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