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April 01, 1964 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Duke Stops Michigan Cagers in NCAA Semi-I

Finak

*

*

*

*

*

Cagers' Late Rally
Beats Kansas State

UCLA
By TOM ROWLAND

Completes 'Perfect' Year

By CHARLIE TOWLE
Acting Contributing Sports Editor
Special To The Daily
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Michi-
gan's Big Ten co-champs ran in-
to a sticky Duke man-to-man
defense that dominated the back-
boards in the opening semi-final
contest of the NCAA basketball
championships last week and bow-
ed out, 91-80.
The Wolverines, minus the serv-
ices of guard Cazzie Russell,
roared back on the second night
of the tourney to dump Kansas
State, 100-90, and claim a third
place finish.
The split in the NCAA finals
gave the Wolverines a 23-5 sea-
son mark, the best ever for a
Michigan basketball team.
Strong Start
Coach Dave Strack's five battled
Duke, the Atlantic Coast confer-
ence champs, even up until midway
in the first half, when a pesky
Blue Devil defense and strong
control of the rebounds, began to
pull away. The Wolverines only
had one offensive rebound on the
Blue side of the ledger when the.
teams left the court at halftime
with the score 48-39, Duke.
In the second half, the Blue
Devils held off every attack that
the Wolverines made on the Duke
point margin, and the closest the
Michigan quintet could come was
seven points.
Fleet Hopes

. Hack Tison opened the
for Duke with a short
from the lane with only

scoring
jumper
10 sec-

of the "twin towers"-they both
stand 6'10"-would be there to
lay it in.
Although in the second half the
Wolverines played the Blue Devils
on even terms, trailing by never
worse than 13 points but never
better than seven,-Michigan never
really got rolling.
The game reached its final con-
clusion when Russell, Buntin and
Oliver Darden all fouled out in the
last minute of play ii the game.
The final game box score re-
vealed that Russell had connected
on 13 of 19 field goals and made
five of six free throws for 31
points in the attempt to give
Michigan a chance at the NCAA
crown. The next highest scorer
for the Wolverines was Buntin
with 19 points.
High point ma efor the.Blue
Devils was Buckley with 25. He
was closely followed by Duke's All-
America forward Jeff Mullins who
hit the hoop for 21. All five of
Duke's starters were in double fig-
ures.
Russell Out
The Saturday night contest with
K-State got off to an ominous
start for the Wolverines even
before the first jump ball with
news that Russell would not dress
for the game on advice of Michi-
gan team doctor, Tom Peterson.
Russell, in his effort to keep
Michigan's NCAA hopes alive the
night before, had pulled the ten-
dons on the outside as well as the
already injured inside of his right
ankle. Russell wound tip the sea-
,on with 260 ot of 507 at-
tempted field goals for a .514
percentage, 150 out of 178 free
throws for an .843 percentage,
and a 24.8 points per game aver-
age.
Herner Starts
Senior Doug Herner, who had
started for much of the 1962-63
season, started his first game of
the 1963-64 campaign and, al-
though he didn't score a point,
contributed a whopping 10 assists
to the Wolverine attack, three
more than the entire Michigan
team had against Duke the night
before.
The- score was tied 11 more
'times through the game until
Michigan finally pulled away at
13:41 of the second half when
Cantrell hit on an 18 foot jumper
to put the Wolverines on top by
two, 67-65.
In Control
Michigan, despite -the seeming
closeness o fthe score, was in con-
trol of the game almost through-
out. They held a 52-47 budge at
halftime, and it was just a brief
spurt at the start of the second
half which kept the Wildcats in
the game as long as they were.
Led by "wondrous" Willie Mur-
rell the 'Cats jumped into a quick
lead at 16:58 of the second half,
56-60, but Michigan quickly mov-
ed back into control of the game.
Michigan's Buntin put on a One
man show during the second half
scoring 22 points on a combination
of jumpers, hooks and layups. He
finished up the game with 33
points, high for Michigan, includ-
ing 15 of 17 free throws.
Return at the Gun
Cantrell picked up 20 points,
including two free throws with
one second left in the game to lift
Michigan to the century mark.
Michigan was the only team that
made triple figures in the tourna-
ment.
Starting forwards Larry Tregon-
ing and Darden collected 16 and 17
points, respectively, and substitute,
Jim Myers helped out the Wolver-
ine cause with seven points and
some aggressive play under the
boards.
Murrell and Suttner tied for
high point honors on the K-Statej
squad, notching 20 apiece.

Ferguson
Buckley
Tison
Harrison
Mullins
Marn
Vacendak
Herbster
Kitching
Mann
Harscher
Cox
Totals
Goodrich
Slaughter
Hazzard
Hirsch
Erickson
McIntosh
Washington
Darrow
Stewart
Huggins
Hoffman
Levin
Totals
DUKE
UCLA

UCLA
G
0-1
4-10
5-9
2-7
4-9
11-16
0-1
0-1
0-1
1-2
0-1

F R
9-9 3
0-0 1
3-5 3
3-5 6
4-4 5
0-0 11
4-4 12
3-4 1
0-0 0
0-1 1
0-0 0
0-0 0

PT
1 27
0 0
5 11
3 13
5 8
2 8
4 26
2 3
1 0
2 0
02
0 0

DUKE'S 6-10 FORWARD Jay Buckley (dark jersey) fouls Michi-
gan's Oliver Darden (55) in the NCAA semi-final at Kansas
City. In the foreground are Bill Buntin (22) and Larry Tregoning
(35). Buckley's 25 points and 14 rebounds paced Duke to a 91-80
victory.

36-76 26-32 52 25 98
38 45-83
50 48-98

Acting Associate Sports Editor
Special To The Daily
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- To the
happy chant of "we're number
one" UCLA's Walt Hazzard and
his Bruin coherts took-home the
net strings; a 30th straight bas-
ketball victory, and the 1964 NCAA
championship trophy last week.
A record 10,864 fans watched
the nation's number one ranked
Bruins outhustle, outrebound, and
outshoot Duke, 98-83, and put on
the final touches to the "perfect"
season for a team that was sup-
Number 30 for UCLA

DUKE
G F R P T
2-6 0-1 1 3 4
5-8 8-12 9 4 18
3-8 1-1 1 2 7
1-1 0-0 1 2 2
9-21 4-4 4 5 22
8-16 0-1 10 3 16
2-7 3-3 6 4 7
1-4 0-2 0 2 0
1-1 0-0 1 0 2
0-0 3-4 2 1 3
0-0 0-0 0 0 0
0-0 0-0 60 0 0
32-72 19-28 44 24 83

MAJESTIC ATMOSPHERE:
Fans Await Tourney Action

posed to be too small for the big-
time cage giants.
Sophs Spark
While the victory could have
only been called a solid team ef-
fort, it took a pair of reserve soph-
omores to come off the bench and
spark the Bruins to the title.
Guard Kenny Washington, once
called "too shy to be much of a
basketball player" by UCLA coach
John Wooden, poured in 26 points
and grabbed 12 rebounds, and 6'6"
Doug McIntosh, in for center Fred
Slaughter after five minutes had
gone by in the game, pulled down
another 11.
Hazzard, named the tourney's
most valuable player, quarter-
backed UCLA's fast-breaking,
run-run attack to a 50-38 bulge
at halftime, and the Bruins were
never again threatened.
While the new champs put on
their expected sharp-passing, out-
court shooting show, it was under
the boards where the Bruins
gained the winning margin. Duke,
with almost a three-inch-per-man
height advantage, was unable to
clamp on to the rebounds that
Coach Vic Bubas and the Blue
Devils were counting on to be the
decisive factor in the game for the
Eastern Regional champs.
UCLA picked off 52 from the
boards, while Duke got 44.
Zone Press
On the defense, the Bruins em-
ployed the same zone press that
brought them a 30-0 season mark,
with key steals by Washington,
Hazzard, and point-maker Gail
Goodrich stopping every Duke at-
tempt to get back in the game. A
6'1" guard, Goodrich led all scor-
ers wth 27 points on some bulls-
eye outcourt shooting.
Duke All-American forward Jeff
Mullins kept the Blue Devils even
up with the Bruins until late in
the first half when Goodrich and
Washington teamed up to lead
UCLA on a 14-point straight scor-
ing spree that set the score at
43-30.
It was 30-29, Duke, when Good-
rich hit on a field goal, then pick-
ed up another bucket after a dis-
puted Duke charging foul, and
followed with another two points
as Duke forward Hack Tison was
called for goal tending.
Either stealing off a Duke pass
before the Blue Devils could get
a shot, or picking off the re-
bounds as the Eastern champs got
cold from the floor, the Bruins
added six more straight points
and the national title was in the
bag.
Ten Points
The closest Duke came after
that was 50-40 at the beginning
of the second half. Both Hazzard
and Mullins fouled out wth six
minutes to play in the game and
Miller Gets
Job at Iowa
IOWA CITY (P)-Ralph Miller,
45, successful coach at Wichita
for 13 years, was named head
basketball coach at Iowa Monday.
Athletic director Forest Eva-
shevski said Miller was the only
person to whom the job was
offered.
Miller succeeds Milton (Sharm)
Scheuerman, who resigned Feb.
28 after six years as head coach.
Scheuerman plans to enter the
real estate business here.
Wichita tied Drake for the Mis-
souri Valley Conference and was
a finalist .in the NCAA Midwest
regional tournament.

LARRY TREGONING .

onds gone in the game, out Mich-
igan center Bill Buntin followed
right up with a jumper from the
top of the circle to knot the score.
Cazzie Russell then followed with
a lay-up and was fouled in the
process by the Devils' Jay Buckley
to give Michigan a 5-2 edge.
When, with two and a half
minutes gone, Buntin put in two
layups -within 20 seconds of each
other to put the Wolverines ahead
9-4, Michigan fans had some
fleeting thoughts of a repeat of

the December contest.
Both Duke and Michigan;
ed to settle down at this
into the pace which they'
hold for the rest of the
For Michigan this meant a

By TOM ROWLAND
Acting Associate Sports Editor
special To The Daily
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The
Municipal Auditorium Arena here
is a vast place-the seats stretch
up to the ceiling on both sides,
and it instills just the right kind
of majestic atmosphere to accom-
pany the nation's four best teams
as they go after the biggest col-
lege basketball trophy in the land.
The arena only seats 10,500
fans, but the seats are nicely
spaced, and they've got backs-
cushioned backs - and whereas
most of the clientele for the
NCAA finals were local residents
present in near semi-formal at-
tire, one could have had the im-
pression that the west side stands
had come to view a Victor Borge-
Jose Greco-Joan Baez triple-
header.
Rah Rah
On the other side, slightly more
collegiate, the Duke 20-man band
complete with pinstripe jackets
and straw hats accompanied five
belles jeunes filles who were lead-
ing the southern delegation cheers.
Michigan and Duke took the floor
for the tourney's first semi-final
match when the arena was just
over half-filled-and enthusiasm
ran dormant. It seems that the
Kansas City folk were waiting for
-the evening's next attraction-
the local K-State Midwest Reg-
ional champs and the nation's
number one Bruins of UCLA.
While the regular Michigan
cheerleading squad was busily oc-
cupied at the swimming and gym-
nastics NCAA tourneys a couple
of Wolverine volunteers made the
trip to KC to lead the yelling.
Roger Sullivan, a junior who once
played frosh basketball, and Jim
Podell tried to keep the Michigan
noise delegation in competition
with the Blue Devils--but then
who can beat a brass band and
five pretty girls?,
Number One?
The Duke team was assigned
lockerroom number one, and they
came out looking the part-tough-
er on the boards and peskier on
defense and a 91-80 decision put
the Blue Devils into the finals.
"I can't fault my team," com-;
mented a disappointed coach Dave
Strack 'afterwards. "They really
tried their best. We know that
we had to dominate the boards,
and we just couldn't do it. We

gave up the ball 17 times-and
you can't do that against a team,
like Duke and expect to get away
with it."
Meanwhile, back on the floor,1
the NCAA championships were be-j
ginning to sound the part. Now it
was the UCLA band-brassy and
four sections full. Then it was all
those cute Kansas State cheer-
leaders, hauling the cage of
"Touchdown 7," the real live
wildcat mascot, around the arena.
Rumor had it that "Touchdown"
had been obtained from the West

arena complete with monogram-
med britches and lucky garters-
the UCLA cheerleaders had finally
made the scene.
The rest is history. As one KC
reporter remarked, "Whatever
else the girls brought with them,
they undoubtedly included a lid
to the Kansas State basket." K-
State's Jeff Simons tried a 15-
foot jumper from the side-
around, around the hoop and out.
Beanpole Roger Suttner and Wil-
lie Murrell got several easy shots
-no good. With the Bruin cheer-
leaders leading a frenzied support,
the UCLAns notched 11 straight
points and were in front to stay.
Final score, 90-84.
Big Crowd
The next night a record 10,864
filled the arena to see the final
action, and Wolverine guard Caz-
zie Russell was one of them. The
heavy pounding of the night be-
fore had been too much for an
already injured ankle to take, and
senior replacement Doug Herner
took the starting guard reigns in
his final game for the Wolver-
ines. Herner tallied nary a point
but was credited with '10 . big
assists as the Big Ten co-champs
got the third-place finish, 100-
90. It was the first time that any-
one had ever passed the century
mark against the Wildcats.
Strack had praise for everyone
afterwards. Chewing on the ice of
a post-game Coke, the Wolverine
coach conceded that soph John
Clawson had seen guard action
against the Wildcats because "he
might well be in line for the start-
ing job next winter." Strack was
talking about the only hole in the
Michigan starting lineup that will
come via graduation next year-at
guard where senior chaptain Bob
Cantrell steps out.

seem-
point
would
night.
grad-

ual falling behind as errors and
lack of control of the offensive
boards slowly but surely killed
Michigan's dream of a NCAA title
in 1964.
Trouble
Michigan consistently fell prey
to the same mistake-trying to
} pass the ball into Buntin or Rus-
sell only to have an eager Duke
defender grab it away. In addi-
tion, Duke's Buckley and Tison
each played one of their better
games of the season on the same
night with the result that when
the long guns of Duke missed one

GIRL CHEERLEADER
Virginia State Game Farm in ex-
change for four Kansas skunks.
The crowd of 10,731, vocally par-
tisan to the Wildcats, either ar-
rived or woke up.
Go-Go
But it was that kind of basket-
ball game that you had to. UCLA
got the tip. Run, run, run. See
UCLA run. Not big, the Bruins
had to count as usual on speed
and a sharp outside shooting eye
-and they did. It was 9-0, UCLA,
before the Bruin band made it
through the opening number.
K-State coach Tex Winter call-
ed time out, adjusted his tie, said
the magic words-and the Wild-
cats re-took the floor, scored 11
straight points, and UCLA once
again had a ball game on its
hands.
An hour later, with the score
75-75, Kathy, Sherie, Pat, and
Marsha came bounding into the

...+i :"Yt}:;wo.nn" "":" ':**'*';';;;;:, s;}}"ii>}cA ">w;>; " n .. }d'' : :xv r:

Blue Fall to Duke, Triumph Over K-State

Ferguson.
Buckley
Tison
Harrison
Mullins
Marin
Vacendak
Herbster
Totals

DUKE
G F R PT
6-11 0-1 0 0 12
11-16 3-5 14 4 25
3-10 6-10 13 4 12
6-15 2-3 2 2 14
8-19 5-6 8 1 21
1-2 0-0 2 1 2
2-5 1-2 2 1 5
0-0 0-0 0 0' 0
37-78 17-27 41 13 91
MICHIGAN
G F R P.T

Buntin
Cantrell
Herner
Tregoning
Darden
Myers
Pomey
Clawson
Totals
Moss
Robinson
S imons
Suttner
Murreli
Williams
Nelson
Paradis
Gottfrid
Barnard
Pomna
Totals
MICHIGA
KANSASS

MICHIGAN
G F R PT
9-1815-1714 2 33
8-17 4-5 3 2 20
0-3 0-0 1 3 0
6-13 4-5 8. 116
8-16 1-3 14 3 17
3-10 1-2 6 1 7
2-4 0-0 2 1 4
1-3 1-2 2 0 3
37-84 26-34 5013100
KANSAS STATE
G F R .PT
4-9 3-3 3 5 11
6-11 0-0 6 2 12.
4-8 -3-3. 3. 3 11
7-15 6-8 5 4 20
10-19 0-0 10 2 20
2-4 0-1 2 ,0 4
2-6 1-1 2 2 5
1-4 3-4 0 0 5
1-1 0-0 2 3 2
0-1 0-0 3 1 0
0-1 0-0 1 1 0
37-7916-2037 23 90
N 52 48-100
STATE 47 43- 90

M
.,y

MADRAS
is
the answer

Me

Buntin
Cantrell
Russell
Tregoning
Darden
Myers
Pomey
Berner
Totals
DUKE
MICHIGAN

8-18 3-3 9
6-10 0-0 4
13-19 5-6 8
3-11 2-2 6
2-6 1-1 9
2-5 0-0 5
0-1 1-2 0
0-1 0-0 0
34-71 12-14 41;

5
2
5
4
5
2
0
0
23

19
12
31
5
4-
1
80

shirts !shorts

sportcoats! vests

I

48 43-91
39 41--80

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