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March 17, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-17

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Indonesia Asks
Volunteer Army
Youth Force Necessary to Meet
Malaysian Draft, Indonesian Claims
JAKARTA, Indonesia (R)-President Sukrano called on Indonesian
youths yesterday to Join a volunteer force to meet what he called
a threat from neighboring Malaysia.
The call for volunteers was Sukarno's answer to a draft call by
Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman of Malaysia last week follow-

De Gaulle in Mexico

Urges Plan
TO .Relocate
U.S.Negroes
WASHINGTON (M)-Sen. Rich-
ard B. Russell (D-Ga) proposed
yesterday adding to the civil rights
bill a federally-financed voluntary
relocation program aimed at giv-
ing all states an equal proportion
of Negroes.
Russell, leader of ithe Southern
forces against civil rights legis-
lation, offered a sim'nilar relocation
plan in 1949 but it was rejected.
Thus the Georgian propelled
the civil rights filibuster into its
second week, with the Senate still
debating whether to take up the
measure. A vote on that prelim-
inary question is expected this
week..
Russell, in putting forth his
$1.5-billion relocation program,
told the Senate that the propor-
tion of Negroes now ranges from.
a high of 42 per cent in Missis-
sippi to one tenth of one per
cent in Vermont and North Da-
kota. It is clear, he said, that ra-
cial problems are most ;severe in
areas of greatest Negro concen-
tration.
His plan, Russell said, would
tend to give each state a ratio
of 10.5 per cent Negro population,
the present national average. This
should help "make a beginning
toward the permanent resolution
of the deep racial conflicts"' in
the United States, he said.
Sen. John S. Cooper (R-Ky)
told Russell he fears that the re-
location proposal, even if adopt-
ed, still would leave the major civil
rights questions facing the na-:
tion unresolved..
Cooper listed them as voting
rights, school integration and
equal access to public accommo-
dations.
Russell made a special, point of
of the small number of Negroes
in the states of some Democratic
leaders who are supporting civil
rights.
He said Montana, home of Dem-'
ocratic leader Mike Mansfield, has
1,467, Negroes or two-tenths of one
per cent of its population.
In contrast, Russell said, the
over-all average of Negroes in,
the 11 Southern states is 22.7
per cent. And in 138 counties,
more than ten per cent of the to-
tal in those Southern states.
He added that "those of us who
are opposed to this legislation .
feel most strongly and sincerely
that it is npither fair nor right
for the seclons of the country
having the smallest percentage of
Negroes to undertake to dictate the
social relationships for the sec-
tions of the country having the
preponderant concentration of Ne-
groes.

'Ing a collapse of peace talks on
the Malaysian crisis. In Malaysia,
government officials shrugged off
Sukarno's announcement.
"It is part of his war of nerves,"
said one official. "I don't think
we should jump to conclusions."
"It sounds like an empty threat,"
another official said.
Sukarno said in a speech he
still wants peaceful negotiations
to end the Malaysia crisis-prefer-
ably a summit conference among
himself, Rahman and President
Diosdado Macapagal of the Philip-
Pines.
The Philippines is involved in
the dispute because of its claim
for part of what is now the Malay-
sian state of Sabah, formerly Brit-
ish North Borneo. The Philip-
pines, however, appears to be eas-
ing its opposition to Malaysia.
formed in September, by prepar-
ing to establish consular relations
with that nation.
Sukarno, said in his speech that
the youth volunteers would be
given military training and will
be used for the "sustenance of our
revolution.",
He did not say whether the vol-
unteers will be dispatched to the
Malaysian - Indonesian - Borneo
border. But Indonesia calls its
guerrillas in Malaysian Borneo
territory as "volunteers" and
"freedom fighters."
Goldwater Gets
GOP Backing
In California
FRESNO, Calif. W-)-Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Ariz), spurred by a
victory over New York Gov. Nel-
son Rockefeller in the California
Republican Assembly S u n d a y,
stumped Northern California yes-
terday.
Goldwater backers won presi-
dential primary endorsement of
the senator by the 14,000-mem-
ber CRA in a bitter fight.
Rockefeller forces had urged no
endorsement of any candidate.
The assembly's own fact-finding
committee also had recommend-
ed no endorsement.
The endorsement is only advis-
ory, but it marked an important
initial victory for Goldwater.

GREETED IN MEXICO CITY-French President Charles de
Gaulle embraced President Adolpho Lopez Mateos of Mexico as
the French chief arrived at the airport in Mexico City yesterday.
De Gaulle is on an official state visit to Mexico to boost France's
image in Latin. America. The visit will last four days and features
consultations between the two leaders.
World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-A ,delegation from Communist Romania talked to
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev yesterday on the way back
from what was believed to have been a peace-making mission to
Peking, and there was strong indication the Romanians carried
bad news.
Some diplomats in Moscow speculated that the news brought back
by the Romanians made clear that patching up the Soviet-Chinese
quarrel is impossible at this time, and Khrushchev will speak out
soon. Some international Communist leaders believe peace in the
camp is impossible.
While the Romanians met with Premier Khrushchev at Gagra
on the Black Sea, Red China renewed its attack on the Soviet.
leadership. So did Albania, Pe-?

king's ideological ally in Europe.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS-A spokes-
man for Africans from Angola,
fighting for independence from
Portugal, said yesterday arms are
being sought outside Africa.
Carlos' Goncalves Cambandio
told a news conference at the
United Nations the rebels had only
some weapons from Algeria and
Ethiopia, while Portugal was us-
ing arms furnished by the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Cambandio did not say specific-
ally that arms would be sought
from Communist nations but de-
clared "we are forced to seek
more effective aid from wherever
we can get it."
* * *
LIBREVILLE, Gabon-President
Leon Mba said yesterday he does

not believe the United States was
involved in a recent plot against
his regime.
In a statement to the press, he
paid tribute to the "disinterested
aid given by the great American
republic."

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