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March 15, 1964 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-15

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MARCH 15, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

U.S.-Greek Ties Survive Riots

REPUBLICAN CONTEST:
Hopefuls Take Campaign To Califorma

By GERALD MILLER
Associated Press Staff Writer

ATHENS-What's behind the
recent wave of anti-American-
demonstrations and rioting in
Greece over the Cyprus issue?
Is this traditional ally seriously
turning on the United States?
Out of a summary of views of
people close to the situation -
Greek government officials, politi-
cal writers and United States gov-
ernment representatives here-two
general answers emerge:
National
Roundup
By The Associated Press
CHATTANOOGA - Teamsters
President James R. Hoffa, convict-
ed on jury tampering charges, yes-
terday lost a bid for a new trial.
United States Dist. Judge Frank
Wilson, who sentenced Hoffa to 8
years in prison and fined him
$10,000 Thursday, formally over-
ruled motions for a new trial.
* * *
LOUISVILLE-The flood threats
of the overflowing Ohio- River sub-
sided somewhat yesterday in the
four states of Indiana, Kentucky,
Ohio, and Virginia. So far 11 have
died in the flooding.

1) Confusion, Communist agi-
tation, emotionalism and suspicion
are behind the anti-American pro-
tests.
2) Despite the protests, Greece
is basically a pro-West country
land and a friend of America.
Truman at Funeral
The news that former President
Harry S. Truman was coming to
the state funeral for King Paul
of Greece was generally hailed
here. He is affectionately referred
to by many Greeks as Barba Tru-
man (Uncle Truman) for his role
in helping Greece survive the post-
war years. In 1947 Truman asked
Congress for a massive outpouring
of economic and military aid to
pull Greece from the misery of
wartime destruction and save the
Balkans from Communist con-
quest in civil war.
The Truman Doctrine was suc-
ceeded by the Marshall Plan. The
programs worked. Greece defeat-
ed the Communists, became a
NATO member and began the long
hard pull toward increasing pros-
perity.
American military and economic
aid up to last year came to a to-
tal of $3.4 billion.
Why So Crabby?
Why then, with a history of that
kind of assistance and support, has
the United States come in for
such hard knocks recently? I
Why did students scream in
front of the embassy things like
"American assassins," "Johnson-

Al Capone," "America hands off
Cyprus," "Out with the 6th Fleet,"
and "Bravo Russia?"
One reason is that emotional-
ism over the issue of Cyprus where
Green and Turkish ethnic groups
are in conflict, runs so high that
most people don't take pains to
learn the facts.
"Ninety-nine per cent of the
Greek people don't have the slight-
est idea what the American and
British stands on Cyprus really
are," one of Greece's most re-
spected editorial writers, said.
Leftists
A large leftwing element in
Greece, mainly Communist, is out
to use any handy issue to foment
agitation against America.
Most of the demonstrators in
the recent marches on the British
and United States embassies were
grade-school and high school stu-
dents who didn't seem to know
what was happening in the United
Nations on the issue.
Another reason is that the Unit-
ed States joined Britain in a NATO
peace proposal for Cyprus. To
many Greeks Britain is automat-
ically suspect because of its past
control of Cyprus. The suspicion
tends to rub off on anyone asso-
ciating with Britain on the Cyprus
issue.
Don't Trust U.S.
Another factor-and possibly
the most important-is that a good
number of Greeks honestly feel the
United States is pro-Turkish in
the dispute. They believe that
Washington regards Turkey as a

more important NATO military al-
ly than Greece in the alliance's
southern flank along the Soviet
bloc.
However, most observers tend to
disregard the aid situation as a
significant factor. It is true that
the United States discontinued
economic aid last year and that in
recent years Turkey has been get-
ting more.
But up to now both countries
have received about the same. It
is no issue in the press and not at
the anti-American rallies either.
Greece is doing pretty well eco-
nomically.
Old Hostilities
Behind it all simmer the antip-
athies of centuries. Greece and
Turkey have a history of mutual
animosity. There are still Greeks
who say their country will take
back Constantinople, captured by
the Turks in 1453. In Athens it is
considered bad taste to call the
city by its Turkish name of Is-
tanbul.
There remains the memory of
the bloody 1922 war between
Greece and Turkey. The Greeks
lost, and thousands of Greek resi-
dents of Anatolia were killed or
driven from Turkey.
Articulate Greeks of all politi-
cal persuasions say Archbishop
Makarios really wants union with
Greece-the "enosis" slogan chant-
ed in the demonstrations.
"With British and American
forces on Cyprus," observed a
G r e e k political commentator,
"there won't be any enosis."

By J. W. DAVIS
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
WASHINGTON - Henry Cabot
Lodge sat tight this week after
his spectacular victory in the New
Hampshire Republican Presiden-
tial primary.
Meanwhile New York Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller and Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Arizona) hit the
hard campaign trail again, this
time in California.
A lot of people were puzzled by
the New Hampshire results, and
nobody but Lodge sounded really
happy.
Lodge Thanks Voters
Lodge, who stayed at his am-
bassador's post in South Viet Nam
while Goldwater and Rockefeller
nearly worked their heads off in
New Hampshire, said of the voters
there, "They have paid me the
highest of compliments and I
shall very carefully consider their
action and all its meaning."
At least as of now, Lodge said,
"I do not plan ,to go to the
United States. I do not intend to
resign."
Politician's Insight
A professional politician's view
of what the New Hampshire vote
meant came from Republican
chairman William E. Miller. He
said the race for the party's Presi-
dentinal nomination is still wide
open, that Lodge's triumph was
something of a regional feat, "but
then you can't discount it, either."
Nixon, it was pointed out by Sen.

U U

DON'T
Forget to pick up your ticket for the
WI LOW POLITAN Bus on March 30
Tickets to Metropolitan are $1.50
and to Willow Run $1.25 -
Buses will leave every 2 hours

CANDIDATES' VIEWS VARY:
Social Security Sparks Debates!

By RAYMOND J. CROWLEY
Associated Press Staff Writer

Everett Dirksen (R-Ill), didn't
spend any money in New Hamp-
shire and still got "a terrific
write-in."
Johnson Doesn't Care
Pennsylvania Gov. William W.
Scranton, who continues to decry
talk that he might run for Presi-
dent, received fewer than 100
writein votes. Still, talk of a boom
for him persisted, and some claim-
ed Scranton alone had come
:Rivals Woo
GOP Group
FRESNO, Calif. YP)-Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller and Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Ariz) paraded their
sometimes clashing views before
the California Republican As-
sembly (CRA) yesterday.
They spoke to delegates of the
14,000-member party organization
who will vote today on whether
they take sides in the Califor-
nia Republican presidential pri-
mary.
Rockefeller forces, obviously
short on support, called for no
endorsement.
Goldwater openly sought CRA
backing and his people predicted
he'll get it.
The endorsement Is only advis-
ory but it could have an impor-
tant psychological effect in the
June 2 primary contest for Cali-
fornia's 86 votes at the GOP na-
tional convention.
Rockefeller urged Republicans
to work together to build, a par-
ty that will serve Americans in
every walk of life, and, that will
reject extremism of the left or the
right.
Later last night Goldwater flung
charges of extremism back at
Rockefeller and scoffed at Lodge
as a "bankers' hours campaigner
who hasn't a chance" of winning
the nomination. He told a news
conference his polls indicate that
the New Hampshire setback had
no effect on his early strength,
largely centered among Southern
Republicans.
A U T 'SN
Di A MO I D
AUSTIN
DIAMOND
CORPORATION

A
C
T
Pi

ssistant General Chim. Publicity
ostumes Properties
reasurer Sets
ickets and Ushers Co-ordinating Artist
rograms Secretary
from March 4--March 15
pick up petitions at Union main desk anytime-
sign up for interview

through untarnished and shining-
ly available.
President Johnson showed no
great interest in what the Repub-
licans were up to.
The Democrats talked about a
matter closer to home-the rela-
tionship between Johnson and
Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy,
who has been boomed in New
Hampshire, Wisconsin and else-
where for the Vice-Presidential
spot on the Democratic ticket this
year.
It has been rumored since 1960,
that Kennedy and Johnson don't
get along. Lately there has been
talk that they are actually feuding.
Viewpoints
Some comments:
By Kennedy-"There is no sub-
stance to these reports. I have
the greatest regard for him."
By a White House source-It is
not true that Kennedy opposed the
selection of Johnson for Vice-
President in 1960: he and his
brother John F. Kennedy were in
agreement on choosing Johnson.
By an associate of Robert Ken-

nedy-"The Attorney General
President Johnson have never
very close. But they are no far
apart than they were three mo
ago. This talk of a feud is
silly."
Pro-Kennedy
Goldwater. said he hopes
Democrats do pick Kennedy
Vice-President. He reasoned
this would make the South
red and make it easier for
Republicans to win the Novel
election.
The Republican Presidential
mary in California on June 2
be an entirely different propos
than New Hampshire's. There
be no write-ins. Goldwater
Rockefeller will clash, with Ha
E. Stassen also seeking a v
on the ballot. In any event
picture should be much cle
June 3.
There's a Republican prir
coming up in Texas May 15
no one seems to want it ex
Goldwater, Texas being gene
considered Goldwater countr
far as GOP politics is concerni

U

OPEN DISCUSSION ON

PETITION FOR

MUSKET CENTRAL COMMITT

between

12:30 and 6:30

Tickets may be purchased in the

Fishbowl on March

18 and

19

from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m .

i

COEDS:
CAN YOU CAN-CAN?
Then We Want You!
(YES, YOU !)
Dance Tryouts,
MICHIGRAS '64 Chorus Line
Tuesday, March 17, 7:30 P.M
Third Floor Conference Room, Michigan Union
IF YOU CAN'T CAN-CAN,.
COME ANYWAY!

WASHINGTON - California,
where.many "senior citizens" live,
is the scene of a new Goldwater-
Rockefeller talking match over
social security.
Sharp words flew over the issue
in the New Hamnpshire primary
campaign and they are flying
again in California.
When Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-
Ariz) suggested in New Hampshire
that social security should be
made voluntary - in place of the
present compulsory taxation of
workers and employers-New York
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller hit
back quickly.
Would Cause Bankruptcy
He said Goldwater's idea would
bankrupt the system and "take us
right back to the poorhouse con-
ception" of relief.
Goldwater denied he wanted to
end social security; he said his aim
was to improve it. The night before
the balloting, he wound up pro-
claiming himself a card-carrying
member, and firm supporter, of
social security.
What part the issue played in
the results will, of course, never
be known exactly. Ambassador
Henry Cabot Lodge, who wasn't
there to talk about social security
or any other issue, won a resound-
ing victory.
Anti-Medicare
Goldwater said recently at a
rally in Visalia that he wants to
see the system strengthened, but
that it cannot be "if we saddle
it" with medical and mental
health care.
Rockefeller, speaking at the
University of Southern California
in Los Angeles, described the sen-
ator's views as "extremish."
Goldwater's leanings toward a
voluntary plan ante-date the New
Hampshire primary. In radio-tele-
vision interviews last spring, for
example, he predicted an eventual
"revolt" among working people
against increasing taxation for
social security.
Superfluous Taxes
If proposed health care for the
aged is addedto" gradual increases
in taxes already slated, he saiduit
"means that by 1970 an individual

could take the money that he and
his employer spend on social se-
curity and buy twice as good a
policy to cover everything that
social security proposes to cover."
Last January Rockefeller said,
"Sen. Goldwater's notions would
wreck the social security system.
He doesn't seem to understand
that a ,contributory social insur-
ance system, based on shared fi-
nancing between employer and
employe simply will not work on
a voluntary basis.
Disaster
"Un d e r voluntary coverage,
those who felt they did not need
the protection would stay out of
the system. This would mean less
income for the system, an immed-

iate deficit in receipts as compared
with the benefits now being paid
to retired persons, and the ulti-
mate bankruptcy of the system
. it would be a national dis-
aster."
In mid-February Goldwater told
a campaign audience, "Social se-
curity is a contract between you
and the government. I don't be-
lieve in breaking contracts."
He spoke of the retirement dol-
lar decreasing in value, and called
for fiscal policies that would guar-
antee the soundness of that dollar.
He said he does not advocate do-
ing anything to the social security
system "until we make a study of
it and find out what should be
done."

Newman Center

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Prof. Frank Grace, Political Science Dep't.
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Prof. Edward Stasheff, Speech Dep't.
Roast Beef Dinner at 7
Sunday, March 15 8:15 P.M.

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