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March 14, 1964 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-14

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snc

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 14,1964

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1984

Gray Great

Sudden Death

Tie Gains

Win

M' Team Effort
Downs Ramblers

1

$y DICK REYNOLDS
A goal by Jack Cole at 7:05 of
the second sudden death over-
time Period gave Michigan's
hockey team a 5-5 tie with Mich-
igan Tech last night, and piloted
the Wolverines into the finals of
the WCHA playoffs.
The deadlock gave Michigan a
9-8 edge in the two-game total
goal series and a chance to meet
the winner of the Denver-North
Dakota series at the Coliseum to-
morrow night.
The game was a typical Tech-
Michigan affair, as the Huskies
refused to give up easily against
the favored Wolverines.
For awhile last night it looked
as though the Tech sextet might
repeat its upset of two years ago
when the Upper Penisula squad
defeated Michigan in the finals
of the WCHA playoffs.

I

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
GOALIE GRAY STYMIES ATTACKERS-Bob Gray makes one
of his 28 saves of last night's game here in staving off Michigan
Tech's offense. His brilliant goal tending in the double sudden
death game helped Michigan gain a berth in the WCHA finals.

'A' TANKERS AT 'M' POOL:
Preps Try for Swim Marks

By BILL BULLARD
A recruiter's paradise, the state
class A high school swimming
meet, will be held today at the
Matt Mann Pool with defending
champion Birmingham Seaholm
favored to repeat.
Records are likely to be smashed
in the meet. In six of the ten
events, swimmers have already
turned in times under the pre-
vailing state marks.
Preliminaries in the 400-yard
freestyle were held late yesterday
afternoon with diving eliminations
continuing on into last evening.j
This afternoon prelims in the oth-
er events will be run off. The finals
begin at 8 p.m. tonight.
Favorite
The best bet for a record break-
ing performance in the meet is
Thurston senior Ken Wiebeck. Asa

a sophomore, Wiebeck entered the
maximum two individual events
and set state records in both of
them. Last season he broke the
50- and 100-yard freestyle marks.
Now, in his last season of com-
petition, he is entering the same
two events where he established
records as a sophomore. There is
only one problem and that is he
will have to break the records in
these events all over again. For
at the 1963 meet Detroit West-
ern's Rick Skarbo teset both of
Wiebeck's marks in the 100-yard
backstroke and the 200-yard in-
dividual medley.
Four Minute Mark
In the 400-yard freestyle, Sea-
holm's Pete Adams and Royal Oak
Kimball's Doug Webster are near
the four minute barrier. Either
one could go under Adams' rec-
ord of 4:04.6. If Webster doesn't

do it at this meet he'll have two
more chances since this is his
sophomore season.
Adams and Kimball's Bill Watts
are under 1:51.0 for the 200-yard
freestyle. The class A mark of
1:52.6 is held by Adams.
Fast Break
Saginaw Arthur Hill's 200-yard
freestyle relay team has already
posted a time of 1:30.4, almost
two seconds under the class A rec-
ord. The relay teams from Sea-
holm and Kimball have also gone
faster than the existing record in
this event
Arthur Hill's Dave Gibson is the
only other swimmer in the meet
who has beaten a current state
record this year during the regular
season. His time of :22:0 in the 50-
yard freestyle is one tenth of a
second faster than Wiebeck's
mark.

"I'm real proud of my boys,"
said losing coach John MacInnis.
"We gave them a heek of a fight
and they knew they were in a
ball game."
Michigan coach Al Renfrew hes-
itated to single out any one player.
However, the Michigan mentor did
mention the fine goal tending of
Bob Gray, who came up with some
great saves in the overtime periods.
Good Start
The losers jumped off to a quick
1-0 lead at 12:27 of the first
period when George Hill beat Gray
on a breakaway shot.
Michigan tied the score at 18:40
of the first period when Mel Wak-
abayashi took a clearing pass from
Bob Ferguson and beat Tech net-
minder Gary Bauman with a clean
shot.
Tech opened the scoring in the
second stanza when Fred Dart tal-
lied at 4:06. Tech's joy was short
lived however, as Gary Butler lift-
ed a hard shot over Bauman's left
shoulder just one minute and 54
seconds later.
The Wolverines added another
goal at 7:41 of the same period
when Alex Hood pushed a dribbing
shot into the Tech net.
Don't Quit
The spunky Huskies just
wouldn't play, dead as they tied
the score at 13:25 on a goal by
Hill.
Pierre Dechaine, playing on the
Martin-Hood line for the injured
Marty Read, sent Michigan back
into the lead again at 18:03 of the
second period.
The third period was a wide
open affair with Tech scoring
twice on goals by Dave Draper at
Life After Death
MICHIGAN Pos. MIC. TECH
Gray G Bauman
Henderson D Palante
Polonic D Wimmer
Wilkie C Hill
Butler W Draper
Cole W Hom
First Period scoring: MT-Hill
(Holm, Draper) 12:27, M-Wakabay-
ashi (Ferguson, Polonic) 18:40. Pen-
alties: M-Day (illegal check) 4:25,
MT-Pallante (elbowing) 6:59, MT-
Chivers (illegal check) 15:36.
Second Period Scoring: MT-Dart
(Chivers, Pallante) 4:06, M-Butler
(unassisted) 6:00, M-Hood (Mac-
Donald, Martin) 7:41, MT -- Hill
(Draper, Palante) 13:25, M - De-
chaine (Polonic) 18:03. Penalties:
MT-Wimmer (interference) 8:54; M
-Wilkie (interference) 12:36, MT-
Lieman (hooking) 14:42, M-Hood
(hooking) 18:28.
Third Period Scoring: MT -
Draper (Palante) 5:59, MT-Patter-
son (Yeo) 16:25. Penalties: M -
MacDonald (interference) 1:50, M-
Ferguson (slashing) 4:17, M-Martin
(tripping) 11:27, M - MacDonald
(interference) 13:45, MT - Mac-
Lelan (illegal check) 16:18.
Sudden Death Overtime: No scor-
Jng. No penalties.
Second Sudden Death Overtime
Scoring: M-Cole (Butler) 7:05. Pen-
alty: MT-Ryan (holding) 1:11.
Saves:
Gray 4 411 5 4-28
Bauman 15 11 7 4 3-40
Raimey Moves
To Cleveland
Former Michigan halfback Dave
Raimey, '63, who missed last sea-
son with a shoulder injury, is quit-
ting Canadian pro football to try
out for a spot on the Cleveland
Browns.
Raimey, who runs the 100-yard
dash in 9.7 seconds, was a ninth
round draft choice of the Browns
a year ago, but declined the offer
to try Canadian ball. His shoulder
injury now healed, he hopes to
gain a spot as flanker back

5:59 and Al Patterson at 16:25.
Patterson's goal sent the game
into the first overtime with both
teams beginning to show the ef-
fects of the fast pace.
Michigan got a golden opportun-
ity at 1:11 of the first extra period
when Tech's Terry Ryan went to
Clark Sets
New Record
HANOVER, N.H. A') - Yale's
predictable Steve Clark set a na-
tional collegiate swimming record
of 1:45.5 for the 200-yard freestyle
yesterday in his qualifying heat
of the Eastern Seaboard Intercol-
legiate championships,
Clark, a junior from Los Altos,
Calif., was seven-tenths of a sec-
ond under the former mark which
he established himself in this meet
March 15, 1963.
His clocking in the 25-yard
pool was 1.1 seconds slower than
the listed American record by Cal-
ifornia schoolboy Don Schollander.
Clark continued his undefeated
status in Eastern Seaboard com-
petition. A year ago he won free-
style titles, at 50, 100 and 200
yards.
Once again his Yale team,
which held at 46-18 lead over
Navy entering the second day of
competition, dominated the quali-
fying heats.
Rahrah! Men
Pick Bosses
Gary Erwin and John Hamilton,
who tied each other only last
weekend for the Big Ten trampo-
line championship, were elected
co-captains of next year's cheer-
leading team yesterday.
Both juniors are expected to
spearhead Michigan's assault for
another NCAA gymnastics cham-
pionship in two weeks. Last year
Erwin won the NCAA tramp title.
They, and the rest of their all-
male cheering squad, will perform
during next year's football and
basketball, games.

the penalty box for holding. The
Blue's power play failed to ma-
terialize as the Huskies success-
fully held off Michigan's big guns.
The Wolverines began carrying
the play in the second overtime
but the losers' defense stopped the
Wolverines' attack on several oc-
casions.
The one big mistake came when
Butler sent a clearing pass from
behind the net onto the stick of
Cole who slapped hom the goal
that spelled doom for the Huskies.
Tonight's game will begin at 8
p.m. There are still tickets avail-
able.

By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS-Ohio Universi-
ty shackled All-America Cotton
Nash and scored a 85-69 upset of
fourth-ranked Kentucky in the
NCAA Mideast Regional basket-
ball playoffs last night.
Defending champion Chicago
Loyola met co-champion Michi-
gan in the second game.
Kentucky's Wildcats, seeking an
unprecedented fifth NCAA title,
were, almost completely outplayed
from the start by Ohio Univer-'
sity's Bobcats, champions of the.
Mid-American Conference.
With almost ridiculous ease, Don
Hilt, Mile Haley, Jerry Jackson
and Paul Storey grabbed rebound
after rebound off Kentucky's
backboard. The Bobcats also did
such an effective job of screening
the 6-5 Nash away from his own
basket that the Wildcat star scor-
ed only 10 points.
- *
Mullins Hot
RALEIGH, N.C.-Jeff Mullins
scored 43 points to lead third-
ranked Duke to an 17-73 victory
over Villanova yesterday in a semi-
final game of the Eastern NCAA
regional basketball, playoffs.
A tremendous first half by Mul-
lins got Duke off to a 49-33 lead.
Mullins tore Villanova's defenses
apart, scoring on 12 of 15 shots
and led all rebounders with eight
recoveries in a 20-minute exhi-
bition.
Villanova, ranked seventh na-
tionally, cut the gap to 65-62 with
6:35 to play before Mullins, aided
by Steve Vacendak, got Duke back
in control.
* * *
Aces High
EVANSVILLE, Ind.-Evansville's
Aces lived up to their No. 1.
ranking in the Associated Press
small college basketball poll by
romping over the Akron Zips 72-
59 last night to win the NCAA
Small College Division champion-
ship.
The North Carolina Aggies won
third place by defeating State Col-
leege of Iowa 91-72 in the opening
game.
The Aces, cheered on by a rec-
ord 12,244 crowd in Roberts Sta-
dium, were ahead from the start
after Buster Briley hit four out of
five long shots in the opening two
minutes.

(Continued from Page 1)

The closest the Zips came after
that was 16-14 as Evansville
bounced into a 42-30 halftime
lead.
* * *
Steal
RALEIGH, N.C.-Connecticut's
Dom Perno hit two free throws
with 32 seconds to go last night,
then stoll the ball from All-
America Bill Bradley to clinch a
stunning 52-50 upset over Prince-
ton and join Duke in the NCAA
Eastern Regional basketball tour-
nament finals.
Connecticut, which carried the
poorest record into the regional
semifinals, 15-10, led favored
Princeton most of the second half.
The teams never were more than
four points apart.
Foul News
WICHITA, Kan.-Kansas State's
crafty Big Eight champions caught
Texas Western in foul trouble last
night and. exploited the advantage
for a 64-60 victory in a first round
game of the NCAA Midwest Re-
gional basketball championship.
Kansas State outscored the Min-
ers 13-2 over one stretch of the
second half, while the stunned
Texans were trying to regroup
from the loss of'Jim (Bad News)
Barnes.
That spurt put the Wildcats out
in front 52-44 and they didn't
trail again. They fought off a
Miner rally in the closing minutes.

but the Wolverines came back to
knot it up and eventually go ahead
after six minutes had elapsed on
the clock in the Minnesota's Wil-
liams Arena.
Paced by Buntin's 16 point first
half and the aggressive rebounding'
of Buntin, Darden and Tregoning,j
each of whom nabbed six, the Wol-
verines were able to boost the
lead to 13 at one point, only to
fall back to seven, 43-36 at the
half.

Kentucky, Princeton Upset
In NAA Regiona Paof

Russell, who had just four points
on two field goals in three at-
tempts in the first half, came back
after the break to seal the win
and drop in 17 in the final 20 min-
utes.
Loyola was within breathing dis-
tance all through the second half
and the few Wolverine fans who
were sprinkled around the sparse-
ly attended arena sat on the edges
of their chairs, fearing a now-fa-
mous Loyola second 'half come-
back.
But the Ramblers could never
quite pull it off.
"We just couldn't get over the
hump," Loyola Coach George Ire-
land said after the game.
Loyola's biggest threat came
with 16 seconds left in the game.
Michigan had an 82-80 lead and
the ball, but Loyola's Jim Coleman
stole the ball at mid-court, only
to be called for walking to ruin
the Rambler's last chance.
Strack praised every member of
the team for the win. "Both Tre-
goning and Darden turned in out-
standing performances," Strack
said, referring to the two forwards,
who were in constant foul trou-
ble, yet still managed to score 20
points between them.
Russell, who'shinjuries are the
major concern of Strack, trainer
Jim Hunt and a special doctor
who now follows the team, said
after the game that his ankle was
beginning to "really hurt." But the
All-American was quick to add
that he'd be ready for tonight's
action against Ohio University,
Rambling Onward
MICHIGAN
G F R P T
Tregoning 7-15 0-0 14 5 14
Darden 4-10 1-1 6 4 9
Buntin 9-23 8-10 13 4 26
Cantrell 3-6 6-8 3 2 12,
Russell 8-15 5-8 7 2 21
Pomey 0-0 "0-0 1 0 0
Myers 1-4 0-0 3 0 2
Totals 3220-27 47 17 84

(

FINAL STATISTICS:
Cagers Rank High in Big Ten

Miller
Rouse
Hunter
Egan
Coleman
Wood
ManzKe
Totals
MICHIGAN
LOYOLA

LOYOLA
G P $ PT
7-26 2-5 7 2 16
-5-13 2-3 14 212
11-18 3-6 6 5 25
3-15 475 3 5 10
7-14 3-4 6 3 17
0-1 0-0 1 0 0
0-1 0-0 0 0 0
33 14-23 38 17 80
43 41--84
36 44-80

By JIM LOSAVAGE
The final statistics of the Big
Ten basketball season find Michi-
gan men high in the most import-
ant departments, although no in-
dividual leaderships were picked
up. ,
In the scoring department, sen-
sational sophomore All America
Cazzie Russell averaged 26.1 points
per game in conference action to
rate third. Just behind him was
All America teammate Bill Bun-
tin, averaging 24.6 points per con-
test.
As a rebounder, Buntin ranked
second in percentage of rebounds
recovered per game with 15.4 per
cent. Sophomore .leaper Oliver
Darden gained eighth spot in the
league with 12.0 per cent. Russell
was Just four places behind him
at 10.6.
Third Spot
Buntin's total of rebounds was
third in the league behind leader
Gary Bradds of Ohio State and
Illinois' Skip Thoren, but his per-
centage was better than that of
Thoren.
In the free throw category, Rus-
sell finished third in percentage

sunk to Iowa's Jimmy Rodgers
and Mel Garland of Purdue. The
latter two tied for first with .855,
Just .003 ahead of Cazzie.
Another notable Wolverine per-
formance was the field goal per-
centage of Oliver Darden. He hit
for 50.8 per cent in Big Ten action
to garner a fourth place. Buntin
finished sixth with 50.4 per cent
of his shots from the floor drop-
ping through.
Dividends
Buntin and Russell's perform-
ances earned themeach a spot on
the All Big Ten first team, as well
as All America honors.
Darden ended his first season
32nd in league scoring, with a
10.6 point per game average, the
third man on the Blue squad in
double figures. Larry Tregoning
and Bob Cantrell finished 38th and
45th with averages of 9.4 and -7.1
respectively.
. This year saw four Big Ten rec-
ords topped by one man-All
America Gary Bradds of Ohio
State. Bradds set a new mark for
points per game with an average
of 33.9, eclipsing Terry Disching-
er's of, 32.8 set in 1962.

He also surpassed the number of
field goals per game mark set in
1956 by Robin Freeman of OSU.
Bradds averaged 12.4 to Freeman's
11.6.
Bradds' third mark was most
points in two seasons, with 907.
The old mark in this category was
also held by Dischinger, who had
scored 864.
Finally, Bradds scored 40 or
more points in six consecutive
games.
Final Stats
FG FT Pts Ave Rebs

I

Scores

1

NCAA
Eastern Regionals
Duke 87, Villanova 73
Connecticut 52, Princeton 50
Small College Division
Third Place
North Carolina A & T 91, State Col-
lege of Iowa 72
Evansville 72, Akron 59
Midwest Regionals
Wichita 84, Creighton 68
Kansas State 64, Texas Western 60
Ohio University 85, Kentucky 69
Western Regionals
San Francisco 64, Utah State 58
HOCKEY
Denver 3, North Dakota 3 (tie)
(Denver advances to finals)
NBA
Detroit 133, Philadelphia 122
BASEBALL
San Francisco 5, Cleveland 2
Chicago (N) 6, Los Angeles (A) 5

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Bradds, OSU
Schellhase, Fur
Russell, Mich :
Buntin, Mich
T. V'A'dale, Ind
Falk, NU:
D. V'A'dale Ind
Lopossa, NU
Thoren, Ill
Hudson, Minn
Brody, Ill
Gent, MSU :
McGlocklin, Ind
Garland, Pur
Brens, Wis
Washington, MSU
Freeman, Ill
Thomann, MSU
Purkhiser, Pur

174 126 474
142 95 379
137 92 366
134 76 344
118 75 311
122 57 301
100 96 296
195 75 285
105 61 271
114 36 264
103 57 263
107 45 259
106 33 245
88 59 235
59 30 148
93 41 227
82 53 217
83 35 201
93 30 216

33.8 194
27.1 157
26.1 122
24.6 178
22.2 162
21.5 60
21.1 164
21.4 161
19.4 190
18.9 123
18.8 61
18.5 113
17.5 91
16.8 50
16.4 95
16.2 133
15.5 131
15.5 129
15.4 55

ra

rC OME

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SlI U rH
A~BrA'tlI

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN-
(Continued from Page 2) Pharm., Bacter., Biochem. & Public
Health. MS-PhD: Instrumentation. BS:
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or Personnel Mgmt., or related field. In- Degrees: AE & Astro., EE, EM, Instru.,
terns receive cash stipend of $140 per Mat'ls., ME, Met., Nuclear. MS-PhD:
month with allowances for rm. & ChE. BS: E Math, E Physics & Sci. En-
meals. Tuition is $50 & cost of 1 3-hr. grg. Prof.: Applied Mech's. R. & D.,
credit course. For further info., write: Des., Prod. & Plant Engrg., Quality Con-
Margaret Goslin, Dir. of Personnel, St. trol, Sales Engrg. & Tech. Reports &
Luke's Hospital, 11311 Shaker Blvd., proposals.
Cleveland, Ohio. Washington State Highway Comm.,
Seattle, Olympia, Vancouver, Yakima,
LIB. SCIENCE PLACEMENT: Wenatchee & Spokane-BS-MS: CE.
INTERVIEWS: May & Aug. grads. Highway & Bridge
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interview schedules in the Lib. Science Health-All Degrees: ChE, EE, ME, All
Office for appointments with the fol- phases of Chem., Physics, Geol., Math,
lowing:
MARCH 16-
Cornell Univ. Lib., Ithaca, N.Y.-Giles 1F
Shepherd, assistant director.
Univ. of Mo. Lib., Columbia-Ralph
Parker. university librarian.
MARCH 1'7-
Boston, Mass., Public Lib. - Ervin n ,s t td eT
Gaines, assistant director..,Lrre--
Univ. of Rochester, N.Y., Libraries-
John Russell director.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedules posted at 128-H
West Engrg. for appointments with the
following:
MARCH 16-I
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All Degrees: IE. Management Services.
Double A Products Co., Manchester,
Mich.-BS-MS: ME. R. & D., Des. S tJ
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I.

i

O N
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT,
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.

T H E,

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service & Communion.
11:00 a.m. Worship-"The Seven Lost Words
of Christ from the Cross"-Choir and
Soloists.
7:00 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Frank Huntley, Eng-
lish Dept.
WEDNESDAY
7:15 p.m. Studies in the Christian Faith-
"The Sacraments and the New Life of the
Christian."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Jonssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian 'Campus Center located at the
Church. ,
Staff: Jock Borckordt and Patricid Pickett
Stoneburner.

It

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Rev. Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
U-M Student Group: 7:30 p.m.
Sunday Evening Forums: 8:30 p.m. Prof. Rich-
ard L. Meier of the U-M School of Natural
Sermon: "Karl Marx: Sin in Society"
Resources will discuss population control.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.
"This I Believe," Dr. Fred E. Luchs
BIBLE FORUM: in the sanctuary, 10:30 a.m.
CHURCH SCHOOL, ages crib-9th grade,
9:30 and 11:15a.m.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone
2-5189.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AdiIn CTIII'nCLT CMTF

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-
"The Wilderness: Covenant of Challenge,"
Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar. Major Religions of the
World: Buddahism. Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program. Susanne
Swibold, "Liturgical Art Workshop."
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m. - Drama Reading Group, Jean
Robe's apartment.
8:30-11:00 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast, Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6-8:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads: Supper and So-
cial evening. Program: Ploy Reading, Pine
Room.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Commnion - Second Sunday of every
month.
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High,
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study

I

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST

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