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March 13, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-13

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FRIDAY, MARCIR 13, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

FRIDAY, MARC~fl 13, 1984 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a rca ua+.

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Labor Seeks 35-Hour Week

-I

By JULES LOH -
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
(Last in a Series)
~ V YORK-Of all the attacks
u t joblessness, plainly the most
tic is labor's all out cam-
for a 35-hour work week.
The Kennedy and Johnson ad-
ministrations have argued against
it on grounds it might be infla-
tionary. Industry opposes it as a
self - defeating measure which
would raise production costs and
kill jobs, not create them.
Labor's statisticians doggedly
contend, however, that if only half
the non-farm work force were put
on a 35-hour week it would release
enough work hours for more than
2.5 million new full time jobs-
though AFL-CIO President George
Meany concedes that to reach this
potential "much would depend on
the extent to which needed work
coincided with both the skills
and geographical location of idle
labor."
National
Roundup
DETROIT - Congressman-at-
large Neil Staebler still leads the
Detroit News Poll on potential
candidates for governor, but popu-
larity among women voters has
made Detroit Mayor Jerome P.
Cavanagh a strong second.
AUSTIN--Two Republican con-
tenders for the Presidential nom-
ination-Michigan's Gov. George
Romney and United States Am-
bassador to Viet Nam Henry Cabot
Lodge withdrew yesterday from
the May 2 Texas primary.
NEW YORK=- Late improve-
ment by the steels helped extend'
the Stock Market's rise to five
str4ight sessions yesterday. Dow-
Jones Industrial Averages showed
30 industrials up .35, 20 railroads
up .14, 15 utilities down .02 and
65 stocks up .11.

In his proposal for double payi
for "excessive" overtime, President
Lyndon B. Johnson appears to be
a step closer than his predecessor
to labor's belief that shorter hours
would spread the work. Labor Sec-
retary W. Willard Wirtz estimates
that last year's overtime in manu-
facturing alone was the equivalent
of 919,000 full time jobs.
Actually, about 7 million Amer-
ican workers already are on work
schedules of less than 40 hours.
Shortest of them all is the 25-
hour week of New York's Local 3
Electricians.
The union sought the contract
(which went into effect July 1,
1962) to cushion the impact of
unemployment in periods of slack
work. Arbitrator Theodore W.
Kheel, appointed by both sides to
study its effects, says it appar-
ently has so far done exactly that.
Kheel says that despite a drop
in the volume of available work.
the 25-hour week has created new
jobs for nearly 1000 apprentices
(for whom labor costs are lower)
and has provided jobs for up to
states who couldn't find work at
3800 electricians from 14 other
home.
Soon to Come
However reluctant most busi-
nessmen may be to admit it, many
feel a shorter work week is bound
to come sooner or later.
John I. Snyder, a computer man-
ufacturer, points out that increas-
ed leisure time will also mean
new leisure time industries, hence
more jobs. Ralph Lazarus, presi-
dent of a department store chain,
foresees "a decade of disposable
time" per working life by 1985: "If
we were able to cut working time
by one-third during the first 40
years of this century," he says, "it
should now take us fewer decades
to repeat the performance."
Lazarus feels that shorter work
days and weeks, however, "seem in-
adequate to the task of bailing us
out of the ocean of free time with
which we will be inundated." He
suggests, instead, sabbaticals for
every worker-12-month vacations
every seven years.
Eight months ago the steelwork-
ers negotiated an agreement which

gives senior employes 13-week va-
cations every five years. Steelwork-
ers Union President David Mac-
Donald figures the agreement
with the can industry alone will
mean 800 to 1000 new jobs when
fully effective.
Lazarus is confident most bene-
ficiaries of sabbatical holidays
would use the free time well: in
study, neighborhood work, peace
corps type endeavors.
Many agree. They point to the
activities of modern housewives,
the one group in America that al-
ready has reaped unquestioned
leisure time benefits through ad-
vanced technology. Instead of be-
coming indolent, they have joined
community activities and society
has benefited.
New Orientation
Others who speculate on the day
when work finally is dethroned
feel, on the contrary, that a com-
plete reorientation of society will
be necessary and enormously dif-
ficult.
In a report to the Center for the
Study of Democratic Institutions,
Donald N. Michael noted that au-
tomation is mainly geared to serve
people in the mass-cope with
traffic problems, financial trans-
actions and so forth. Consequently
the thinking machines, he says,
"undoubtedly will help to seduce
planners into inventing a society
with goals that can be dealt with
in the mass rather than in terms
of the individual.
"Somewhere along the line," Mi-
chael concludes, "the idea of the
individual may b^ completely
swallowed up in statistics."
No Soul
A dreary prospect, but some
don't consider it a far fetched fear.
Those most concerned with the
human problems associated with
automation point out that labor,
though a burden, also is the chief
instrument through which man
finds identity in today's society.
Tending a machine isn't very soul-
satisfying.
The true value of the new tech-
nology, they insist, must be deter-
mined not according to mechani-
cal efficiency but according to
how much it does or can contribute
to the welfare of man as an in-
dividual and a social being.
That's the hard question. So far
nobody is certain of the answer.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
EDUCATION DIVISION:
Beginning Mon., March 16, the follow-
ng schools will be at the Bureau to
interview prospective teachers for the
1964-1965 school year,
MON., MARCH 16--
Parma, Ohio-Elem., Sec.-Engl., Math
For. Lang., Sd., Bus. Ed., Voc. Ed., Soc.
St., PE, Art, Music.
Westport, Conn. - All Elem.; Sec.-
Engl., Hist., Math, Guid., Sci., Rem.
Read., Fr./Span.
Grand Blanc, Mich.-Elem., K-. Lib.,
I.H.-Art, Home Ec., Span., Lang. Arts/
Soc. St., Boys PE/Sci., Boys PE/Math,
,ounsel.. Math; H.S.-Art, Engl., Span.,
Read., Math; Sp. Corr., V.T. Type A,
Em. D., Diag
Ypsilanti, Mich.--Elem. K-6, Art (El.
st Sec.), Girls PE; Sec.-Soc. St. (J.H.),
0ounsel., Biol., Math, Fr., Engl., Ind.
Arts.
Hazel Park, Mich.--Elem., K-6, Em.
Dist.; J.H.-H.S.-Math, Sci.; J.H. Girls
PE; V.T.
Los Angeles, Calif.-Elem, Sec.
New Hyde Park, N.Y.-J.H. - Art,
Engl., Span./Fr., Soc. St./Av.

TUES., MARCH 17--
Pontiac, Mich.-Elem. K-6, Lib.; J.H.
-Engl., Math, Lib., Art, Vocal, Instr.;
H.S.-Engl., Lib., Ger/Hist.
Fort Wayne, Ind.-Elem. K-6, Art, Mu-
de, E1.fIJ.H. PE, Spec. Ed., Bus. Ed.,
Engl., Fr., Span., Latin, Home Ec., Ind.
Arts, Instr. Music, Vocal Music, Lib,
Math, Publications, Sci., Soc. St.
Madison Heights, Mich. (Lamphere
Schools)-Elem., J.H.-Engl., Eci., Math
SMCG), Home Ec., Rem. Read.; H.S.-
Engl., Soc. St., Math (SMSG), Type
A; Elem. Vocal/Instr., Rem. Read.
Wyoming, Mich.-Fields not yet an-
pounced.
Los Angeles, Calif.-Same as above.
Greenwich, Conn.-Engl., Physics, J.H.
-Math, Soc. St., Gen. Sci., Guid., Fr./
Span. (El. & Sec.).
WED., MARCH 18-
Flint, Mich.-Elem. K-6, Sei., Read.,
9rith.; Spec. Ed.-Sp. Ther., EMH, Part.
Sigh., MH; V.T.; Sec.-Ind. Arts, Engl.,
"hem., Physics, Biol., Gen. S., Math,
Home Ec., Art, Instr. Music, Vocal
Music, Girls PE, Lib.
Warren, Mich. (Warren Woods) -
Elem. K-6, Instr. Music, Art, Type A,
rype B, Speech; J.H.-Soc. St./Engl.,
Math/Sci., Engl.; H.S.--Engl., U.S. Hist.,
3irls & Boys PE.
Bakersfield, Calif. (Kern County H.S.)
--Art, Bus. Ed., Engl., For, Lang., Home
Ec., Ind. Arts, Lib., Math, Vocal, Instr.,
Wirs PE, Gen. Sc., Biol., Chem., Life
Sci., Physics, Soc. St., Spec. Ed.
St. Louis, Mo. (Ladue School District)
-Elem. K-6, Art; Sec.-Engl., Lang.
Arts/Soc. St., Soc. St., Math; J.H.-

Elome Ec., Read., Math/Sci., Read.; H.S.
Span, Chem/Biol, Area Specialists -
Engl., Soc. St., Math, Set., For. Lang.
Montrose, Mich.-Elem. K-6, Math,
Chem., Physics, Fr., Girls PE.
Littleton, Colo. (Araphoe County) -
Elem. K-6, Speech Corr., Rem. Read.;
J.H.-Engl./Soc. St., Math, Fr., Span.,
krt, Girls PE, Home Ec., Lib., Counsel.;
E.S.-Span, Math, Fr, Soc. St., Home
Ec., Arts/Crafts, Ind Arts, Counsel., Lib.
rHURS., MARCH 19-
Grand Rapids, Mich.-All Fields.
Grand Rapids, Mich. (Godwin Heights)
-Elem., Boys & Girls PE, Read., H.S.-
Math, Sel.
Bloomfield Hills, Mich. (Kingswood
School Cranbrook) - Chem./Physics
(woman chair.), PE (Woman, field
hockey & dance), Housemother
Cleveland, Ohio-Elem., Spec. Ed.; Sec.
-All except Guid., Boys PE, Psych.,
Soc. St., Speech.
Olivet, Mich. - J.H./H.S.-(Modern)
,Them./Biol./Physics, Engl./Bus. or
Comm., Elem., 1, 5, 6.
Rockford, Mich.-Elem., J.H.-Comm.
Skills, Set./Math, Span./Latin; H.S.-
Math/Speech.
FRI., MARCH 20-
NO INTERVIEWS.
* * *
There will be no interviews during
spring vacation. Make appointments
sbout one week in advance. If you find
.t necessary to cancel, please do so
the day before.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
)ointments, 3200 SAB, 663-1511, Ext.
3547,

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Evelyne Scheter, concert pianist

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