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March 12, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-12

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THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
S

a ZMT.X.C/

r

Attempt To Link
Baker, Johnson
Scott Asks Review of Testimony;
Democrats Move To End Hearings
WASHINGTON (P) - Republicans renewed yesterday their ef-
fort to point the flagging Bobby Baker investigation toward the White
House and President Lyndon B. Johnson.
With witnesses pleading the Fifth Amendment and Democrats
indicating they are about ready to wind up the hearings, Sen. Hugh
Scott, (R-Pa.), said Republican members of the investigating com-
Q>mittee have submitted a list of a

HUGH SCOTT
t
INCIDENT :
U.S. Crew
Survives
MOSCOW WP)-An East German
nurse said yesterday the three-
man crew of an American recon-
naissance bomber shot down Tues-
day survived with one officer be-
Ing injured slightly.
The Soviet Union admitted one
of its fighters shot the plane down
and claimed it was on a military
reconnaissance mission but refus-
ed to tell American diplomats the
fate of the crew.
Standing Orders
A protest note handed to United
States Charge d'Affaires Walter G.
Stoessel charged that American
planes flying along the East-West
A border carry nuclear weapons. It
said the Soviet air force had or-
ders to shoot down any NATO
plane that penetrates the air space
of the Soviet Union or its allies.
The plane crashed near Garde-
legen in East Germany, not far
from the air corrid' Western
planes fly to Berlin and about 30
miles from the West German bor-
der.
United States representatives
from the military mission in Pots-
dam were en route to the crash
scene.
United States radar units in
West Germany said they saw the
Americans parachute when their
Jet reconnaissance RB-66B bomb-
er was brought down by the Soviet
fighter.
Plane Strayed
Washington protested the hostile
wction, but apalogized for the pen-
etration of East German territory.
It said the plane had strayed. It
was the second such incident in
six weeks. Another United States
plane crashed in East Germany
Jan. 28.
Stoessel said he asked Soviet
Deputy Foreign Minister Vladi-
mir Semyonov about the crew, but
was told there was no further in-
formation.
The charge d'affaires denied
that the plane was on an intelli-
gence mission.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The White
House, after discounting reports
of ,a feud between President Lyn-
don B. Johnson and Atty. Gen.
Robert F. Kennedy, took pains yes-
terday to play down the apparent
value of any pro-Kennedy drive
in the Wisconsin primary. Feud
talk coincided with an organized
effort to have New Hampshire
Democrats write in Kennedy's
name for vice-president in Tues-
day's primary.
CAPE TOWN-Minister of La-!
bor Alfred Trollip announced in
parliament yesterday the South
African government will withdraw
from the International Labor Or-
ganization. Asion and African del-
egates have frequently boycotted
ILO meetings to protest South Af-
rica's segregation policies.
WASHINGTON - The United
States protested sharply yesterday
the sacling of the United States i

dozen or more witnesses they want
called.
Scott said he wants the commit-
tee to review an affidavit from
Don B. Reynolds, the insurance
man who has said he bought John-
son a $585 stereo set.
New Development
Scott referred to the Reynolds
affidavit, which speaks of a "kick-
back of commission" on a $100,000
life insurance policy sold to John-
son, as a new development.
L. P. McLendon, special counsel
to the Senate Rules Committee
conducting the inquiry, said an
affidavit was turned over to the
committte late Tuesday by Sen.
John J. Williams (R-Del.), who
started the investigation last Octo-
ber.
McLendon told newsmen he
had read the affidavit, dated Mon-
day, and had discussed it with
Chairman B. Everett Jordan, (D-
N. C.)
The committee counsel declined
to comment on its contents or say
whether Reynolds would be re-
called as a witness. He said in re-
sponse to questions, however, that
he knows of no additional witness-
es, including those on the Repub-
lican list, whose testimony would
not be repetitious.
The GOP list was not made
public, but it was reported to in-
clude the name of Walter Jenkins,
long time Johnson associate who is
now a special White House aide.
White House Press Secretary
Pierre Salinger said he had no
comment on the Reynolds affi-
davit.
In the sworn statement, the in-
surance man said that on Feb. 20
of last year, Baker telephoned him
"to advise me that Vice President
Johnson desired to know the
amount of the rebate, or kickback
of commission, he would receive
from his life insurance conversion
of $100,000 term to $100,000 per-
manent retroactively to date of
issuance of term."
Collect Call
Baker had the call charged to
him, Reynolds said.
Later, on his return to this
country., Reynolds said, Jenkins
asked him "if I had received my
commission and I stated I had.,'
Baker was Secretary to the Sen-
ate's Democratic majority at the
time, a post he held when Johnson
was Democratic Majority Leader.
In his testimony last Jan. 9,
Reynolds said that after selling
Johnson a $100,000 policy he
bought $1,208 worth of advertising
time on an Austin television sta-
tion controlled by the Johnson
family.

Rails Give
New Signs
OfCrisis
WASHINGTON (MP-- The na-
tional rail crisis appeared yester-
day to be arming up again as four
unions moved to create a rift in
the solid negotiating front of some
200 railroads.
The unions picked out what a
spokesman described as two "ex-
tremely rich railroads" and offer-
ed to sit down with them in sep-
arate talks about wages and oth-
er issues unsettled by the national
negotiations.
Advertised Accusations
At the same time, the unions
took large advertisements in sev-
eral of the nation's biggest news-
papers accusing the national ne-
gotiators of refusing every effort to
settle the long dispute.
The four unions are the AFL-
CIO Locomotive, Firemen and En-
ginemen, the Independent Loco-
motive Engineers, the AFL-CIO
Railroad Trainmen and the Inde-
pendent Railway Conductors and
Firemen.
The unions' move was the first
ripple in an uneasy truce since
the expiration last month of an
emergency law Congress passed to
head off a strike last August.
New Changes?
The railroads are now free to
impose their proposed changes in
wage structure and working con-
ditions, which the unions say will
cause a strike, but so far they
haven't done so.
The railroads are also free to
start laying off thousands of fire-
men under a federal arbitration
ruling, but haven't started doing
that either. The unions' appeal of
the arbitration ruling has been
upheld by a federal court of ap-
peals and is now pending before
the United States Supreme Court.
Apparently, neither side is anx-
ious to precipitate a new nation-
al emergency like that last year
and thus force Congress to step
in again.
Some key legislators had hinted
last year that both sides might
be sorry if Congress was forced
to pass further legislation to avert
another crisis.
A union spokesman said yester-
day that the separate approach to
the Southern Pacific and the
Louisville & Nashville Railroads
was designed to "establish a na-
tional precedent" and at the same
time avoid setting off a new na-
tional strike threat.

(Fourth in a five-part series on
(automation)
By JULES LOH
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
NEW YORK-Three different
methods seem to be attracting
major attention as direct answers
to the plight of workers replaced
by machines: relocation, retrain-
ing, and a shorter work week.
Experiments with the first two,
relocation and retraining, so far
have been disappointing.
Workers who lose their jobs
seem to be the ones least able to
relocate-generally they are older,
lower paid, less skilled workers. Of
325 men who lost their jobs in
one plant closing, 265 had debt
liabilities of more than $900 each.
Retraining
Many displaced workers also ap-
pear from early experiments to be
either unable or unwilling to be
retrained.
Two classic examples of full
blown retraining programs were
conducted by Armour & Co. to-
gether with the United Packing-
house workers and the Amalgam-
ated Meat Cutters. They were tried
when Armour closed a plant in
Oklahoma City in 1960 and one
in Fort Worth last year.
Of 433 workers eliminated by
machines in Oklahoma City only
170 were interested in retraining,
only 60 were eligible, only 58 took
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
specialty areas from noon to 5 p.m.
TODAY, March 12. Applicants must be
19 or older.
Camp Winnebagoe, Ontario -- Coed.
Will interview for cabin counselors with
skills in riflery, sailing or riding,
Thurs. & Fri., March 12 & 13.
Camp Arbutus, Mich.-Coed. Will be
interviewing TODAY for a secretary,
nurse & instructors in sailing, tennis,
drama & dancing. Applicants must be
19 or older.
DetroitrEdison-Will be interviewing
Juniors in LSA majoring in Econ. or
Finance on Mon., March 16 from 10
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Camp Commission of the Detroit Con-
ference of the Methodist Church-Look-
ing for camp counselors & all other
camp staff for the following camps:
Conley Methodist Camp, Barbeau,
Mich.; Camp Knight of the Pines,
Cheboygan; Lake Louise Methodist
Camp, Boyne Falls; Hubbard Woods
Methodist Camp, Huron City; Lake Hur-
on Methodist Camp, Jeddo; Jduson
Collins Memorial Methodist Camp, On-
sted; Birch Valley Methodist Camp,
Lum. These camps are all in Mich. If
interested come to Summer Placement.

WILLARD WIRTZ
training courses, and fewer than
20 landed jobs relating to their
new skills. In Fort Worth 650 were
displaced.. 165 enrolled in training,
117 completed the courses, 41
found jobs.
No Jobs?
As automation spreads it be-
comes increasingly difficult to an-
swer the question : retraining for
what? "Training programs will be
cruel delusions," Labor Secretary
W. Willard Wirtz said. "If there
are not jobs at the end of them."
Still, Thomas J. Watson Jr., a
leading computer corporation
president notes, "A company must
be prepared to make a commit-
ment to internal education and re-
training which increases in geo-
metric proportion to the techno-
logical change the company is go-
ing through." For his own com-
pany, that amounts at present to
$45 million a year for education.
Federal retraining programs,
Watson says, "in no way relieve
corporations of the responsibility
they bear for the retraining of
their own people."
Industrialists such as Watson

and Snyder seem to be in a mi-
nority, however. One survey
showed that 76 per cent of a group
of corporate managers felt a com-
pany is entitled to all the savings
resulting from introduction of la-
bor saving equipment.
Some unions are carrying on
their own retraining programs.
The International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers, for one, has
put 50,000 members through
courses in modern industrial elec-
tronics. Top grade men receive the
instruction in Washington, then
return home and teach the courses
in their own locals.
Most authorities see education
as one of the most powerful wea-
pons against unemployment, es-
pecially in a society becoming in-
creasingly technological. Prof.
Charles C. Killingsworth of Mich-
ian State University urged
loans to college students up to a
maximum of $12,000 with 40 years
to repay. It is a fact that jobless-
ness at the top of the educational
scale is almost nonexistent.
Government Work
The most massive effort at re-
training, of course, is being done
Dy government.
Under the Manpower Develop-
ment and Training Act, of 1962,
about 6000 displaced workers have
completed retraining and, as the
program grows, about 100,000 are
expected to be enrolled this year.
The cost is roughly $4000 per stu-
dent. After the third year of the
program the states will have to
contribute half.
Last December, Congress passed
the Vocational Education Act, a
vast scheme to improve, expand,
modernize and upgrade the status
of vocational training across the
country. Primarily designed for
youngsters just entering the work
force--and there will be more than
four million of them this year-
the program also will help retrain
men who have lost their jobs.
(TOMORROW-
THE 35-HOUR WEEK)

Can We Cope with Automation?

50% OFF
Faust Part I
Varieties of History
Masterpieces of the Drama
How to Read a Book
The Causes of the American
Civil War
Russian Verbs of Motion
and others'

40% OF
Intro. to Chemistry-Niti
Nuclear Reactor Metallurgy
Childhood & Society
and others

Continental Bookstore
330 Nickels Arcade
(Over Blazo's)
Big
Sale
(Don't ask why-we're just funny that way)
ALL NEW Books-20% off or more
MANY NEW BOOKS-30-40-50% OFF
Titles at 30%7otff include:
A SURVEY OF MODERN ALGEBRA
INTRO. TO ELECTRO-CHEMISTRY
HENRY JAMES SELECTED FICTION
THE BRUTAL MANDATE-N IETSCHE
OUTLINE OF METALLURGICAL PRACTICE
THE TRAGEDY OF AMERICAN DIPLOMACY
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION-THE U.S. & JAPAN
RUSSIAN AREA READER-TABLES OF FUNCTIONS
FAUST PART 2 & VOCABULARY
PHYSICAL METALLURGY FOR ENGINEERS
AND OTHERS

PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS NOW IN STOCK-
GOING AT COST
Records
Vox-$1.98 & $2.25
Folkways-$2.25 & $3.00

A Cordial Invitation Is Extended to Hear
THE HON. YAACOV SHIMONI

P

I

I

Naturally our wide and diversified selection of fine music includes a
recording of last night's "War Requiem" as performed at Hill
Auditorium by the University Choir and Orchestra and guest soloists.

MUSIC SHOP

headquarters
for
U of M music
417 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

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