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March 10, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE 8IXk

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1964

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. MARCH 10. 1964

tc.
.... CHIPS...
by Mike Block
The Week That Was
This was the gretest week that ever was in Michigan sports
history. It was the first time Wolverine teams ever won five Big Ten
championships in a single winter. And it was the first time any
Western Conference team has ever performed this feat-unless you
include fencing.
In 1952, Illinois took home the trophies in basketball, track,
gymnastics, wrestling, and fencing. If you substitute hockey (a sport
in which the Illini have never competed in the conference for fenc-
ing (in which Michigan hasn't, participated), these are exactly the
same crowns which the Wolverines cinched this week.
Over the years, these two schools have clearly dominated
the Big Ten winter sports scene. Illinois has won or shared three
or more winter sports championships in 10 different years, the
.first being 1912, and the last 1958. In addition to the quintet of
crowns in 1952, they won four in 1951 and garnered three plus
a tie in 1935.
Michigan has had at least a trio of titles or shares thereof six
times, but this is the first time the Blue has ever won more than
three. Four of these exceptional years have come in the last
five campaigns, 1962 being the only exception. Only one other
school has ever won three winter crowns in a year as much as
one time, and that was Ohio State in 1950.
Incidentally, 1944 was one of the most fabulous years in Wol-
verine annals, if sports. of all seasons are considered. In that year,
Michigan copped seven conference championships: swimming, wrestl-
ing, indoor and outdoor track, baseball, golf, and tennis. They failed
to win only football and basketball.
Michigan's and Illinois' domination of the Big Ten is also appar-
ent when you add up the total number of winter titles won. Since
1902, Illinois has been victorious a total of 74 times,.with nine ties'
while the Wolverines have had 59 victories and four draws. The
now-departed Chicago has 32 wins and three ties, Ohio State 27
and four, and all the rest have 20 or fewer championships.
If the 19 Illini fencing titles and the three Michigan hockey
trophies are subtracted from the above totals, the Wolverines
have a slight edge, 56 to 55, in the sports in which both schools
have always participated. The way Michigan has been going
lately, this margin is bound to increase rapidly.
So much for numbers. Let's get down to what actually hap-
pended this past week. The basketball team, for one, even with
last night's loss to Purdue, had a share of the Big Ten crown
for the first time since 1948. Ironically, Michigan owes its share
of the championship largely to arch-rival Michigan State's
dramatic win over Ohio State Saturday night. They enter the
NCAA playoffs this Friday against Loyola or Murray State.
The hockey team, meanwhile, salted away first place in the
Western Collegiate Hockey Association by burying Michigan State,
9-4 and 13-4, over the weekend. In so doing, they tied the Michigan
record for most goals in a season, and wound up with a regular
season won-lost mark of 21-3, their best campaign ever in this
respect. The icers can now look forward to the WCHA playoffs,
beginning Thursday at the Coliseum.
Down at Columbus, the track team swept past a favored Wis-
consin aggregation, 67-48, for its fifth win or draw in an indoor
meet in the last six years. Paced by individual champs Des Ryan,
Al Ammerman, Kent Bernard, Ted Kelly, and Roger Schmitt, the
Wolverines took command from the start, and the Badgers never
seriously threatened their lead.
There were two meets at Madison, gymnastics and wrestl-
Ing, and Michigan squads once again came away with triumphs
in these fields of endeavor. The gymnasts, getting phenomenal
performances from the tumblers and trampolinists, defeated
a much-improved Iowa team 131-112 for their fourth straight
conference crown. Captain Arno Lascari, injured elbow and all,
and Mike Henderson picked up firsts, while Gary Erwin and
Johnny Hamilton tied for that honor on the tramp.
The grapplers wrapped up their second straight Big Ten
title despite the loss of NCAA champ Rick Bay. Again Iowa was
the number one contender, but the Wolverines outdistanced
them 56-41. Featherweight Ralph Bahna and 147-pounder Lee
Detrick garnered individual trophies.
Up at Minneapolis, the swimmers didn't win, but they did put
up a strong performance against Indiana's powerhouse. The Hoosiers
took it, 2231-171%, but the Wolverines came about 40 points closer
to them than in 1963, easily subduing third place Ohio State. Sopho-
mores Bill Farley and Rich Walls scored firsts for the Blue, and
bolstered by this year's talent-laden freshman team, the Wol-
verines have every chance to bypass the Hoosiers in 1965.
So there you have it-a week that saw Michigan's .great
athletic tradition become a little bit greater. Funny how those
high academic standards frighten all the good athletes away.

Stun
(Continued from P

Co-Champion Hoopmen

Cagers Eye NCAA;
No TV Coverage Set

age 1)

Eddy said. "But my team played
a great game."
Besides shooting 53 per cent
for the whole game, the Boiler-
makers only lost the rebounding
battle, 43-39. And in the second
half they actually outfought the
Wolverines on the boards, 20-11.
Most Wins
Michigan finished the regular
season with a 20-4 mark, its larg-
est number of victories in history.
The Wolverines and the Buckeyes
are co-champions of the Big Ten
with 11-3 records. Michigan plays
the winner of the Loyola-Murray
State game Friday night in Min-
neapolis in the semi-finals of the
Mideast regional.
Russell ledaboth teams in scor-
ing with 27 and pushed his total

point output for 24 games to 593,
the largest total in Wolverine his-
tory. Buntin was second highest
scorer for the Wolverines with 19
points, boosting his season total
to 534 points.
.For the first 10 minutes of the
first half it was a close ball game
with both teams being held to a
maximum lead of four points
throughout the half. Buntin
scored quickly for Michigan with
a sweepinghook. Russell stole the
ball before Purdue had a chance
to shoot and Cantrell hit on a
25-foot jumper from the left of
the free throw line.hThis 4-0 lead
was the largest the Wolverines
were to have all evening.
After Buntin's lay-up at 10:20
that put the Wolverinesabehind,
21-19, Michigan couldn't score for
almost three minutes. Purdue was
on top by ten points, 31-21, when
Darden's j u m p e r, Russell's
jumper, and two free throws by
Russell cut the Purdue lead to
41-38. But Garland's shot as the
buzzer sounded dropped in for a
basket and Purdue led 43-38 at
the intermission.
Purdue enlarged its lead to eight
points but Michigan finally moved
ahead with half the period gone.
Behind 55-50, Darden hit on a
jump shot and Russell shoveled a
pass into Buntin under the boards
which was quickly turned irto a
lay-up.

For the rest of the game both
teams were within a point or two
of each other except when the
Boilermakers grabbed a five-point
lead with 7:40 to go. The Wolver-
ines cut this down to a tie only
to lose in the fatal last two
minutes of the game.
Spoilermakers

Schellhase, I
Jones, f
Brown, c
Purkhiser, g
Garland, g
Gramms
Totals
Tregoning
Darden, f
Buntin, c
Cantrell, g
Russell, g
Herner
Pomey
Totals
Attendance:
PURDUE
MICHIGAN

PURDUE
G F R PT
11-17 3-5 12 3 25
5-1l 1-2 9 4 11
0-2 3-4 6 2 3
11-16 4-4 3 2 26
6-16 4-4 4 2 16
0-0 0-0 1 0 0
33-62 15-19 39 13 81
MICHIGAN
G F R PT
4-8 0-0 8 0 8
7-12 0-0 7 3 14
8-25 3-3 13 2 19
3-7 1-1' 1 2 7
11-23 5-6 9 4 27
0-2 0-2 1 2 0
2-4 0-0 2 0 4
35-81 9-13 43 13 79

By TOM WEINBERG
Nobody knows if the NCAA
regional games at Minneapolis
this week will be on television for
the Michigan fans.
The Sports Network and Bill
Flemming are definitely planning
to telecast both the action on
Friday nigtht and Saturday night,
but it is still uncertain as to
whether or not the Detroit outlet
NCAA Tickets
Ticket manager. Don Weir
has announced that an un-
known quantity of tickets for
the NCAA regional basketball
tournament at Minneapolis this
Friday and Saturday will be
available today. For further in-
formation, call the ticket office,
NO 2-3238, in the afternoon.
The prices are $3.00 and $1.50.
of the Sports Network, WJBK-TV,
channel 2, will be able to clear
the air time necessary to carry
part or all of the action from
Minneapolis.
A spokesman for the station said
yesterday that it was doubtful
that the station would be able to
clear the time. He said that there
were no plans as yet on the cover-
age.
If channel 2 declines to telecast

the tournament, any other Detroit
station is eligible to pick it up.
However, a spokesman for WWJ-
TV, channel 4, also said that his
station had no plans for the cov-
erage.
The Wolverines meet the win-
ner of tonight's Loyola-Murray
State game on Friday night. The
Loyola game is part of a first-
round doubleheader at North-
western's McGaw Hall. The other
game features at-large represent-
ative, Louisville, against the Mid-
American Conference champions.
The Mideast winner will then
advance to Kansas City the next
weekend, March 20-21, along with
the winners from the East, Mid-
west and Far West.
The Far West winner, expected
to be UCLA, will meet the Mid-
west champ, probably Wichita, on
Friday night, while the Mideast
titlist will be paired against the
champions of the East, probably
Duke.
The two Friday night winners
face each other Saturday night
for the national crown. That
game, and the semi-finals are
slated to be televised nationally
on the ABC network.
Summing up, all Michigan has
to do is win a couple games this
weekend, then take a couple more
the next weekend.

_a
4-.

I

Big Ten Standings

I

FINAL
Conference All Games
W L Pct. WV L

7,650.

45 38-81
38 41-79

MICHIGAN
Ohio state
Minnesota
Michigan State
Purdue
Northwestern
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Wisconsin

11 3
11 3
10 4
8 6
8 6
6 8
6 8
5 9
3 11
2 12

.786
.786
.714
.571
.571
.429
.429
.357
.214
.143

20 '4
16 8
17 7
14 10
12 12
9 12
13 11
9 15
8 15
8 16

I

Scores

l

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA Regionals
Villanova 77, Providence 66
Princeton 86, VMI 60
Creighton 89, Oklahoma City 78
Connecticut 53, Temple 48
Texas Western 68, Texas A & M 62
OTHER SCORES
Kansas State 74, Iowa State 69
Colorado 89, Nebraska 73

LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Purdue 81, Michigan 79
Illinois 90, Iowa 67
Indiana 76, Northwestern 68

Nuttall Sets Federation Mark

BOB PURKHISER
.. clutch shooting
Select Russell
To Look Team
The sophomore wonder, Cazzie
Russell, can add one more feather
in his already cluddered hat of
national recognition.
This time it's an All-American
berth on the Look Magazine team.
Russell was an unequivocal choice
on this team, as he and Ohio
State's Gary Bradds were the only
two players to be selected by
unanimous vote of the writers who
selected the 10-man squad.
Bill Buntin was placed on 'the
NCAA District 4 all-star team.
In addition to Russell and
Bradds, Bill Bradley of Prince-
ton, Mel Counts of Oregon State,
North Carolina's Billy Cunning-
ham, UCLA's Walt Hazzard, Bud
Koper of Oklahoma City, Jeff
Mullins of Duke, Cotton Nash of
Kentucky, and Dave Stallworth of
Wichita were named to the mag-
azine's all-star team.

4

14

I

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - Cliff Nuttall,
lanky Michigan hurdler, set a U.S.
Track and Field Federation record
last night, when he skimmed thej
50-yard high hurdles in 6.1 sec-
onds at the 13th Milwaukee Jour-
nal Indoor Games.
Nuttall's time bettered the US-
TFF record of 6.3 seconds by Wis-
consin's Steve Muller In 1963. In
victory, Nuttall got revenge over
another Badger, Ted Dakin, who
narrowly defeated him in the Big
Ten Indoor Meet last Saturday.
Nuttall's clocking was, however,
:00.2 off the American record set
by Hayes Jones in 1961.

In the high jump, Wolverine
sophomore Bob Densham scored
an upset victory over a strong
field, including 7-footer Joe Faust.
Densham leaped 6'8" and was
awarded first place on the basis
of fewer misses. Both Faust and
Indiana's Cornelius Miller also
jumped 6'8". Michigan's Big Ten
Indoor champion, Al Ammerman,
failed to place.
Another Michigan sophomore,
Dorie Reid, performed well, with.
a third place finish in the 50-yard
dash. Bob Moreland of Michigan
State won the event in the USTFF
record of 5.2 seconds.

DUKE THIRD:
Michigan Places Second
To UCLA in Final Poll

In the 500-yard run, Michigan's
Dan Hughes placed fourth. Wis-
consin's Elzie Higginbottom, Big
Ten Indoor 440-yard champion,
won the event in 58.1, breaking
Hockey Tickets
There are still plenty of
tickets left for the WCHA
hockey playoffs to be held at
the Coliseum Thursday and
Friday nights. The prices are
$1.00 for card holders and stu-
dents, $1.50 for general admis-
sion, and $2.00 for reserved
seats.
the old USTFF record of 58.6,
held by Dave Mills of Purdue.
Wisconsin's Al Montalbano won
the 600-yard run in the time of
1,11.5. Montalbano, who finished
second to Michigan's Kent Ber-
nard in the Big Ten Indoor Meet,
seemed to benefit from Bernard's
absence. Roger Kerr, Iowa's de-
fending USTFF champion, nipped
former Illinois ace George Kerr
at the wire for second place.
Brian Sternberg of the Univer-
sity of Washington, who set an in-
door record of 16'312",; in winning
the pole vault in Milwaukee last
season, was the Games honorary
referee.

Welcome

11

to
Continental
Hairstyling
"Your Hair Problems
Are Our Care !"

TIs Week i Sports
THURSDAY
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
(WCHA playoffs)
FRIDAY
BASKETBALL-Michigan vs. Loyola-Murray State winner,
at Minneapolis (NCAA regional)
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
(WCHA playoffs)
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-NCAA Regional at Minneapolis

"Science With Christian Concern"
Lecturer: HAROLD K. SCH I LLI NG Ph.D.
Dean of the Graduate School
Pennsylvania State University
Lecture IV in series of five on
"DOING THE TRUTH"
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Wednesday, March 11
7:30 p.m. Admission Free

Visit

,

By The Associated Press
Michigan ended up the season
just one notch behind unbeaten
UCLA in the final Associated
Press college basketball poll of
the 1964 season.
UCLA's Bruins are the first
team from the West Coast to fin-
ish on top since the powerful San
Francisco Dons in 1956.
UCLA collected 34 first place
votes and 392 points in the final
voting by a special regional panel
of 40 writers and broadcasters.
The Wolverines wound up sec-
ond with 341 points.
The Cincinnati Bearcats, last
year's No. 1 team, did not receive
a single vote in this season's final
balloting. They had a 17-9 won-
lost record.
UCLA completed its regular
season last week by defeating
I

California and Southern Califor-
nia for a 26-0 mark. The Bruins
There were only two changes in
the next-to-last and the final
standings. Kentucky, beaten by
St. Louis in its final regular sea-
son start, dropped to fourth be-
hind Duke. The Blue Devils dis-
posed of North Carolina State,
North Carolina and Wake Forest

The Dascola Barbers
(near Michigan Theatre)
or
The U of M Barbers
(North U. near Kresge's)

If

generation
The Campus Inter-Arts Magazine
will be. on sale

I

in winning the Atlantic
Conference tournament.

Coast

PETITION FOR

W L Pts.
1. UCLA (34) 26 0 392
2. Michigan (1) 20 4 341
3. Duke 23 4 300
4. Kentucky 21 4 258
5. Wichita 22 5 258
6. Oregon State (1) 25 3 190
7. Villanova 22 3 124
8. Chicago Loyola 20 5 120
9. DePaul 21 3 72
10. Davidson 22 4 44
Other teams receiving votes: Ari-
zona State, Bradley, Bowling Green,
Creighton, Drake, Kansas State,
Miami (Fla), Minnesota, New Mexico,
Ohio State, Ohio University, Provi-
dence, San Francisco, Seattle, Texas
A & M, Texas Western, Vanderbilt.

MUSKET CENTRAL COMMITTEE

Assistant General Chm.
Costumes

Publicity
Properties

Tr
Ti
Pr

reasurer Sets
ickets and Ushers Co-ordinating Artist
rograms Secretary
from March 4-March 15
pick up petitions at Union main desk anytime-
sign up for interview

MARCH 12
Featuring
Carl Oglesby
F. H. Bergman
Lynn Coffin

I

WISE OWLS...-
do all their banking at Ann Arbor Bank. Three
campus offices serve your entire banking needs
including Specialcheck account, especially prac-
tical for students. Why not stop in today and
open your Specialcheck account?

ELECTION YEAR IS HERE!

--41w.:!9

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ANN ARBOR BANK
SEVEN FULL SERVICE OFFICES: Main at Huron I
E. Liberty near Maynard / Packard at Brockman /
S. University at E. University / Plymouth Rd. at
Huron Parkway / Whitmore Lake / Dexter

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NEWSWEEK 3.50 yr.
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CALL or WRITE TODAY-WE'LL BILL YOU LATER
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Box 1161, Ann Arbor
Phone 662-3061, DAYS or EVENINGS

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