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March 08, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 8, 11

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAIlY SUNDAY. MARCH 8.1

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Hawkins Characterizes Dance

1

THIS WEEK'S

EVENTS

4.

(EDITOR'S. - NOTE: This is the
first in a series on Erick Hawkins
and modern dance.)

t,

TODAY

- 1

By GAIL BLUMBERG b
To choreographer Erick Hawk-
ins the art of dance is contem-
porary; it is a mature- expression,
an exploration of pure movement,
a sensual glorification of being.
As a dancer first, and then as a
choreographer, Hawkins has been
intimately involved in the develop-
ment of the modern dance. Orig-
inally trained in Greek literature
and art, he began his study of the
modern dance with Harald Kre--
utzberg and Martha Graham.
Hawkins. is responsible for a new
concept in the collaboration of
music and dance, as well as for a
modern theory of time and dura-
tion in movement.
His definition of the dance is
modern and concise:
True Movement
"The most beautiful dance is
violent clarity. It is effortless and
spontaneous. It is dance that ded-
icatedly loves the pure fact of
movement; that knows true. move-
ment to start in the pelvis and
spine, the center of the body, and
to flow into the tassel-like legs,
arms and head.
"Suen dance must sense itself
and the music instant by in-
stant. It loves time-time as a
sensed duration with all the subtle
asymmetrical divisions of time.
Yet, it always is the pulse of time.
"Dance that is sound in psyche
and body always produces rhy-.
thmical movement. Movement and
n.usic put together witho at a com-
mon pulse' is two people talking
to you at the same time."
New Stress
Modern dance came into exist-
tence around 1927. It brought a
new sense of the physical, Hawk-
ins said. It destroyed the lifeless
two-dimensional theatre, replacing
it with the first successful "vocab-
ulary" for mature ideas in the
Western world.
Art must live in the present and
completely express that present,
Hawkins said. "Because methods
of expression in art have produced
fine results in the past, they can-
not be retained out of adoration
or of safety. Once new possibili-
ties appear, any art has to change.
"Once Isadora Duncan danced
without toe shoes, then without
any shoes, and without a tutu, the
toe shoe and tutu were dead for
us in America," he commented.
Larger Principle
The change in any art, Hawk-
ins explained, cannot be the addi-
tion of a modernized facade. Mod-
ern dance is a larger technical

1-5 p.m.-Alpha Rho Chi will
present a student art show in-'
cluding sculpture and painting.
2:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present Paul
Shyre's "The Child Buyer" in
Trueblood Aud.
3 p.m.-The music school will
present a wind instrument concert
in Lane Hall Aud. with works by
Mozart, Boucher and Bonneau.
3 p.m.-The India Students As-
sociation will honor James A.
Davis, director of the Interna-
tional Center, in the Multipurpose
Rm. of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-W. D. Snodgrass will
read some of his poems in the
League Ballroom as part of the
Creative Arts Festival..
8 p.m.-Candidates running for
election to City Council will pre-
sent their platforms in St. Francis
School Aud. There will be a ques-
tion period after the speeches.
8:30 p.m.-Paul Shyre's "The
Child Buyer" will be presented in
Trueblood Aud.
MONDAY, MARCH 9
3-5 p.m.-A counselling seminar
will be held in the Union third
floor conference room to inform
undergraduates about courses,
professors and opportunities in the
literary college.
4 p.m.-Prof. Thomas H. Weller
of Harvard University will discuss
"Newly Isolated Viruses Respon-
sible for Fetal Damage" in the
public health school aud.
4 p.m.-The Institute of Science
and Technology will sponsor a lec-
ture by Gabriel Kron, consultant
to an electrical equipment manuf-
facturing company, on "Linear
and Nonlinear Diakoptics" in
Aud A.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Benjamin C.
Johnson of the public health
school will speak on "The Tecum-
seh Survey of Community Health"
in Rm. 62 of North Hall.
8 p.m.-K. S. Gupta of India's
Central Relief Committee will
lecture on "Tibetan Refugees in
India" in Rackham West Confer-
ence Rm.
TUESDAY, MARCH 10,
11:45 a.m-Prof. Selma Frai-
berg of the social work school,
sponsored by the Huron Valley
Chapter of the National Associa-
tion of Social Workers, will speak
on "Research in the Ego" and
"Development and Its Implications
for Social Work" in the Union
Ballroom.
4 p.m.-There will be a meet-
ing of students interested in sum-
mer jobs in Washington, D.C., as

part of the Summer Intern Pro-
gram, in the Multipurpose Rm- of
the UGLI.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Arthur Mendel
of the history department will
speak on "The Political Image of
the USSR" in the Multipurpose
Rm. of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-Professors Allan Seager
of the English department, Rich-
ard Wilt of the art department,
and Leslie Basset of the music
school will talk on "The Modern
Arts" in the Union Ballroom as
part of the Creative Arts Festival,
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
4 p.m.-Gabriel Kron, consul-
tant to an electrical equipnent
manufacturing company, will give
the second lecture of a series on
"Linear and Nonlinear Diakop-
tics' in Aud A.
4 p.m.--Prof. N. B. Marshall of
the Woods Hole Oceanographic
!Institute will lecture on "The
Sound Producing Mechanism of
Fishes, with Special Reference to
the Deep Sea" in 1400 Chemistry
Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-The Center for Chi-
nese Studies and the sociology de-
partment will co-sponsor a col-

Christianity in the Light of His-
tory" at the Hillel Foundation.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Deming Brown
of the Slavic language and litera-
tures department will speak on
"The Culture Image of the USSR"
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI.
8:30 p.m. - Benjamin Britten's
"War Requium" will be presented
in Hill Aud. Prof. Maynard Klein
of the music school will conduct
the University Symphony Orches-
tra and the Faculty Chamber Or-
chestra. Catherine Cook will con-
duct the Tappan Junior High
School Choir, featuring soprano
Janice Harsanyi, tenor John Mc-
Collum and baritone Ralph Her-
bert.
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
4:30 p.m. - The International
Center will hold its weekly Inter-
national Tea.
8:30 a.m.-Howard Peck will
speak on "How to Communicate
Employe Benefits Effectively" in
the Union as part of a Bureau of
Industrial Relations Seminar.
2:15 p.m.-Prof. Alfred Kuhn of
the University of Cincinnati will
speak on "An Information Theory
of Knowledge' in the Main Con-
ference Rm. of the Union.
4 p.m.-Prof. Einar Borchmann-
Hanssen of the University of Cal-
ifornia will speak on 'Recent De-
velopments in the Alkaloids of
Opium-Chemistry and Biogenesis"
in Rm. 1300 of the Chemistry Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-The Russian studies
department and the education
school will sponsor a speech by
Prof. Nicholas Kazarinoff of the
mathematics department.
4:15 p.m.-As part of the School
of Music DMA Piano Series, Fred
Coulter, guest pianist, will present
a program of works by Couperin,
Amy, Messiaen and Debussy in
Aud A.
8 p.m.-The Center for South-
ern Asian Studies Symposium will
sponsor a speech by Prof. Freder-
ick G. Bailey of the University of
Chicago. He will speak on "Politics
and Social Change in India" in
the East Conference Rm. of Rack-
ham.
8 p.m.-Prof. M. Kent Jennings
of the political science depart-
ment will speak on "The Image of
the Federal Bureaucracy" in the
Michigan Rm. of the League,as
part of a Political Science and
American Society for Public Ad-
ministration Roundtable.
FRIDAY, MARCH 13
8:30 a.m. - Howard Peck will
speak on "How to Communicate
Employe Benefits Effectively" in
DIAL 5-6290
NOMINATED FOR

and NTonlinear Piakoptics" in
Aud. A.
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Wendell Gar-
ner of John Hopkins University
will speak on "Properties of Stim-
ulus Sets as Factors in Learning
and Perception" in Aud B.
8 p.m.-The University Concert
Dance Organization will present
the Spring Concert of Modern
Dance in Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Choral Union Series
will present the Chicago Opera
Ballet in Hill Aud., performiing
ballets from "Carmen," "Die Fled-
ermaus," and "Sleeping Beauty-"
SATURDAY, MARCH 14
2:30 p.m.-The Spring Concert
of Modern Dance will be presented
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 pm.-The Spring Concert of
Modern Dance will be presented
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-As part of the Crea-
tive Arts Festival, the Develop-
ment Council Concert will feature
Negro folk singer Odetta in Hill
Aud.
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
S p.m.-Prof. and Mrs. Ernst
Scheyer of Wayne State Univer-
sity will .speak on "History of
Impressionism in Painting and
Piano Music" in Lane Hall as part
of the Creative Arts Festival.

x

,,r

PROF. MAYNARD KLEIN

the Union as part of the Bureau
of Industrial Relations Seminar.
10 a.m.-There will be a special
meeting'in the University High
School cafeteria for sophomores
interested in'special education.
4 p.m. - E in a r Brochmann-
Hanssen will deliver a second
Pharmacy Alumni Lecture on
"Chromatography in Pharmaceu-
tical Research" in Rm. 1300 of the
Chemistry Bldg.
4:15 p.m. - Gabriel Kron will
deliver his third lecture on "Linear

ERICK HAWKINS-"Modern dance is a metaphor of existence."

principle than all Western dance.
It is scientificaly more accurate
and aesthetically more capable of
contemporary expression.
The theory of classical ballet
technique, he recalled, was, orig-
inated in the Renaissance, when
the body was regarded diagram-
matically. It resulted in a two-
dimensional mode with static po-
sitions.
It excluded the sensuousness ex-
perienced in the movement of
the dancer: It restrained the body
from developing its '"fullest po-
tential without the imposition of
any external concept or artifi-
ciality.
Movement 'Vocabulary'
"The movement 'vocabulary' of
a well trained modern dancer may
include r aspects of movement
which ballet has used previously.'
But their former usage doesn't
make them 'ballet.'
"They are human movements
in use all over the world. As such,
they can be successfully incor-
porated in the new principles of

movement and aesthetics of the
modern dance," Hawkins said.
Hawkins work is choreographed
without music, in silence. In pre-
vious dance forms, movement was
created to conform to the music.
We have no tradition of form
for movement in the West, Hawk-
ins declared. "Too often the temp-
tation has been for the dance to
borrow musical form."
Independent Development
"Movement created in silence
could not use the music as a
crutch. The form deeply inherent
to movement would have a chance
to discover itself."
After the dance is composed,
music is commissioned. The col-
laboration has become artistically
independent; the poetry exists in
the space between the two crea-
tions.
In costumes, a sense of sculpture
in motion is not enough. The
excitement of a visual image
touching a human body is neces-
sary to contribute to the art as a,
unified whole.

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for
Program Information

PROF. ALLAN SEAGER

loquoum on "Reflections on Chi-
nese Modernization" in Rackham
Amphitheatre. Speaking will be
Prof. Robert N. Bellah of Harvard
University.
4 p.m:-Prof. David M. Gates,
consultant to the director of the
United States Bureau of Stand-
ards in the area of. physics of the
atmosphere at the Boulder Lab-
oratories in Colorado, will lecture
on "Energy, Life and Environ-
ment' in Aud. E of the Physics-
Astronomy Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Ellis Rivkin
will speak on "Judaism, Jesus and

9

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Wed., March 11, at 8 p.m.

I

Final Lecture in Series, "THE JEWS AND JESUS"
by
DR. ELLIS RIVKIN,
Prof. of Jewish History, HUC-JIR

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y 7 ">S~.v..4>. ."," y ,f.:, :+...:r f"r,".CR ¢, .a? .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... . . . . ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........,...... ..."...................................... . ... . ..7. .

on

"JUDAISM, JESUS AND CHRISTIANITY
IN THE LIGHT OF HISTORY"

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan ,fog which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN. form to Room
3564 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-John Osborne's "The
Entertainer" with Lawrence Olivier,
Joan Plowright; pius short, "Orange and
MARCH 14, 1964
ODETTA!!!

Blue": Architecture Aud.,
9 p.m.

7 p.m. and

For Other University Events today
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
Student Tea at the home of Presi-
lent and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher Wed.,
Uarch 11, from 4-6 p.m. All students
cordially invited.
Foreign Student Tuition Scholarships:
The deadline for receipt of applica-
tions is March 20. Forms are available
°rom the Counselors in the Interna-
tional Center.
May Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
9.1 requirements for the teacher's cer-
5ificate must-be completed by April
10. These include teacher's oath, health
Statement, and Bureau of Appoint-
:nents material. The oath should be
:aken as soon as possible in Room 1203
Univ. School. The office is open from
3:30-12 and 1-4:30.
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
!12 SAB--
Camp Charlevoix, Mich.-Boys, will be
Interviewing for men counselors in all
pecialty areas from noon to .5 p.m.,
Wed., March 11 and all day Thurs.,
March 12. Applicants must be 19 or
alder.
Red Fox Day Camp, Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Will interview Tues., March 10 for
trts & crafts counselor, Instrumental
music head, and general counselors with
life saving certificates.
Camp White Pine, Ontario-Coed, will
nterview from 1:30 to 5 p.m. for section
aeads, canoe trip supervisor, arts &
,rafts director, and a riding director at
Summer Placement. Also instructors in
.anoeing, nature, ceramics, and riding.
Camp Manitouwabing, Ontario - Co-
ad, will interview on March 11 and 12.
Camp Winnebagoe, Ontario-Coed, will
n terview for cabin counselors with
kills in riflery, sailing, or riding March
12 & 13.
LIB. SCIENCE PLACEMENT:
INTERVIEWS:
Library Science students and alumni,

or other lib,.school. grads, please sign
interview schedules in the Lib. Science
Office for appointments with the fol-
lowing:
MARCH 9-10-
New York Public Lib., New York City
-Neil Riggs, Superv. Librarian, Person-
nel Office.
MARCH 11-
Ohio State Univ. Lib., Columbus-
Mrs. Celianna Wilson, Personnel Lib.
Purdue Univ. Lib., Lafayette, Ind. -
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baptist Student Union, Bible Study:
'What Does God's Word Teach about.
;he Holy Spirit?" March 9, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Room 3X.
. * s
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Sunday Seminar, "The
Early Church,", March 8, 7 p.m. to 8
p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Hillel Foundation, Grad Mixer, March
3, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica, meeting, March
3, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Choral Vcs-
pers by Choir, Soloists and instrumen-
talists-compositions by Lassus, Graun
ind Barbar, Sun., March 8, 7:15 p.m.,
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
* * *
Voice Political Party, Membership
neeting, Mon., March 9, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Room 3-B. Rennie Da-
vis, director ecenomic research and ac-
,ion project for Students for a Demo-
,ratic Society, will speak on "Organiz-
.ng the Voiceless Poor." Important dis-
,ussion of VOICE programming. All
welcome.
s* s
Unitarian Student Group, Talk and
discussion with slides, March 8, 7:30
p.m., Unitarian Church, 1917 Washte-
naw. Speaker: 'Dr. Myron Wegman,

lean of School of Public Health. Top-
.c: "Who? World Health Organization
Af the UN."
Keith Dowden, assistant to the director
for reader services.
MARCH 12-
Univ. of Mich. Lib.-Miss Marjorie
Tompkins, assistant to the director in
charge of personnel.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3544 for ap-
pointments with the following:
MON., MARCH 9.-_
Bureau of the Budget, Washington,f
D.C.-Men & women, Dec., May & Aug.
grads. Seeking: Econ., Poll. Sci., Soc.,
Law BA & MA. Also Publ. Health &
Nat. Res. (MS & PhD). Positions: Econ.,
Foreign Trade, Labor Econ., Pubi. Ad-
mn., & Stat. Location: Washington
only. U.S. citizens.
Marathon Oil Co., Detroit, Mich. -
Men, May & Aug. grads (p.m. only).
Seeking. Liberal Arts majors; also Bus.
Ad. & Chem. Positions: Territorial Sales.
Location: Ill., Mich., Ohio, Ind. & Ky.
TUES., MARCH 10-
Bureau of the Budget-(See Mon.)
Harris Trust & Savings' Bank, Chica-
go, Ill.-Men & women, May & Aug.
grads. Seeking: Liberal Arts w/ demon-

strated interest in Econ. Positions: All
areas of Banking. Students (men) whose
course of study is directly related to
business may be eligible for summer
trng. prog. Please check with Bureau
for more info. on this.
Port of New York Authority, New
York, N.Y.-Men & women, May grads.
Seeking: Econ., Poli. Sci., Engl., For.
Lang., Soc., Psych., Journ., Philo., &
Gen. Liberal Arts. Positions: Manage-
ment Trng., Personnel, Publ. Admin.,
& Transportation.
H. J. Heinz Co., Detroit, Mich.-Men,
Dec. & May grads. Seeking: Liberal
Arts majors. Positions: Merchandising
& Sales. U.S. citizens. Location: Mich.
& Ohio.
WED., MARCH 11-
Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.
-Men, May & Aug. grads. Seeking: Gen-
eral Liberal. Arts w/ special mention
of Econ. Positions: Management Trng.
Prog.U.S. citizens.
United Air Lines, Pittsburgh, Pa, -
Women only (p.m. only). Positions:
Stewardess Training Prog. Must be sin-
gle & have no physical defects. Any
area of study w/ or without degree
is acceptable. Applicants must be be-
tween 192 & 26 yrs. of age. Openings
avail. from April through fall. Location:
Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles,

10,
ACADEMY AWARDS
Remember-
The First Night
Feature Starts 6:45

ALL ARE WELCOME
Zwerdling-Cohn Hall

11

1429 Hill St.

DIAL 2-6264
Shows Start at 1:00-
2:55-4:55-7:00 and 9:10

Shows at 1:15-3:45-6:30-9:05
Feature 15 Min. Later

3

Record Breaking
Week

:": :G::":":{":ii:":":: :ti"}:"is": :ti:vi:G:: i}:"y,"i:":tii"S:r :Syit< "::'":" : :4: :

Petition For

MUSKET CENTRAL CO

ODETTA
Development Council
Concert
Ticket Sales:
March 9-13
HILL AUD. BOX OFFICE
$1.50 $1.25 $1.00

Asst. General Chairman
Costumes
Treasurer
Tickets & Ushers
Programs

Publici
Propert
Co-ord
Sec reta
Sets

MMITTEE
ty
ies
inating Artist
iry
115
n desk
ew.

"BEST COMEDY
EVER MADE!/
-Newsweek
--I
The whole
world loves
Adult Entertainment
Prices This Show Only
Weekday Mats. $1 .00
Eves, and Sunday $1.25

I

from March 4-March
Pick Up Petitions at Union mai
anytime-sign up for intervi

FROM THE
1" BEST SELLER
hAT ASTOUNDED
>TH-E NATION!

JOHN FRANKENHEIMERJOEI.
aROOUCTUON OP
DNAY
aEMEwwa uRYsa

I

SOUTH QUAD SPRING FORMAL
la notte romana
Saturday, March 14, 9-1
Price $3.50
U I 'r - Tho Ror-Wn n e

EDMOED OBRIEN MARTIN BA"

t

DIAL
8-6416

I
_ir.T.TTT"bTrr;l
kc'-w7; 1 u I A"

Continuous
From 1 P.M.
TODAY

I

KURO%;
powerful,m

S AWAl

S

"The suspens
"Tense, thrill

modern drama
e is terrific."
Time Magazine IA D
ing .. . rf

presents

Union-League Creative Arts Festival

x'

9

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'gM IPL X A t", m . r rk r. t .\ ri INO r'

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