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March 07, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

&TURDAY, MARCH 711964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-?;y~ .~ Rockwell Voices Views UIEST GROUP FL
w ~j~on Communism, Racism June 1st NEW YORK TO <

IGHTS TO1
GLASGOW

World Redistributes Funds Through Aid

(Continued from Page 1)
nation of six million Jews during
Worrd War II. "The only ones
that were gassed were the same
ones that we're going to gas --
those who are committing Commu-
nist treason."
He had previously said that "I
have nothing against honest Jews.
I am for loyal Jews. But not those
who are loyal to Moscow or Tel
Aviv. I want them to owe all
their loyalty to the United States.
If they share that loyalty-with
either Moscow or Tel Aviv-it's
treason."
Rotten Image
"I have reached you with my
name and symbol and party," he
said. "I had to accept a rotten
image to become known."
He claimed that free speech
was only enjoyed by the rich be-
cause they are the only ones with
enough money to reach people
through mass communications.
In another era a Tom Payne
could change people's i d e a s
through pamphlets. Now, he said,
100,000 pamphlets on a subject
would not ' do much to change
people's ideas. This is why he
supports a proposal to let any citi-
zen who collects 1000 signatures
appear on television and express
his views.
No Apathy
It doesn't matter what this emo-
tion is as long as it doesn't allow
people to be apathetic. "The Nazi
swastika makes people emotional,"
he said.
"The masses don't like any sub-
tle shades of meaning," he assert-
ed. "They like simple black and
white solutions. They are people of
emotions and not of ideas.
-"This is why we use tactics of
mass manipulation and emotional
engineering. We must get the
masses and the youth.
Mass Hatred
"Without them, you're just a
blabberer. If you ever went into a
working class bar on a Saturday
night and talked to a working man
after he has had a couple of beers,
you'd know what the masses think.
The masses hate Communism and
they hate race-mixing."
When asked about the member-

By A. I. GOLDBERG
Associated Press Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS - Put your
tumb down anywhere on the land
'eas of a world map except North
nerica and most of Europe, and
u'll jab a tender spot where part
$8.5 billion is being spent an-
ially in foreign aid to develop-
g countries.
Alphabetically t h e recipients
,nge through 124 countries and
rritories from Aden to Zanzi-
tr. Geographically they circle the
obe.
About $2.5 billion is in private
.vestment aid. The remaining $6
Ilion is in public funds distribut-
t in the form of grants, loans,
aining of experts and sending
chnical experts and equipment.
is distributed bilaterally, from
untry to country; regionally
om or to groups of countries;
d multi-laterally, from many
untries to many countries and
.nnelled through agencies.
U.S. Gives Half
Outside of the fact that the
nited States accounts for one-
lf of all foreign aid in the
=ld today, nobody has any pre-
se figure on just who gives how
uch to whom.
A United Nations technical
sistance survey, stressing that it
as not otficial, developed these
her general facts:
-Nobody knows just how the
ivate ad is shared.
-About 10 per cent of public
d is channeled through the UN.
-Chief donor countries are the
nited States, Britin, France, So-
et Union, West Germany, Can-
ia, Japan and. Switzerland.
-Other important donors in bi-
teral aid programs are Nether-
nds, Denmark, Norway, Sweden,
artugal and Italy.
-Australia and New Zealand
ianneled t h e i r contributionse
trough the British Common-
ealth Colombo Plan.
-Every one of the 87 countries
assified by the UN members as
iderdeveloped gets some form ofi
d, either in direct help or inI
chnical assistance and advice.1
Concentrates Aid .
The UN survey showed that
Cited States aid programs were
presented in 81 less developed
euntries but were concentrated in
out 20 that got about four-fifths
world News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
ATHENS - King Paul of the
ellenes died yesterday in the 17th
ar of his reign and was immed-
tely succeeded by his son Con-
antine.
* . *
DALLAS-The state completed
direct testimony against Jack
iby, on trial for murdering Lee
arvey Oswald, at 3:55 p.m. yes-
rday.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
rved upward late yesterday,
osting averages in quiet trad-
g. In the Dow-Jones averages,
industrials were up 2.26, 20 rails
, 15 utilities down .10 and 65
)cks up .66.

of the $2.6 billion budget of aid
through the Agency for Interna-
tional Development.
Largest United States programs
were listed in Korea, Nationalist
China, Philippines, Viet Nam, In-
dia, Pakistan, Israel, Turkey,
Greece and Brazil..
More than half of the, total aid
budget's nonrepayable develop-
ment grants go to Latin America
and to Africa.
Agencies Help
Latin America needs are fed
through the six specialized agen-
cies of the Organization of Ameri-
can States and through the Inter-
American Development Bank.
The United States also contri-
buted $1 billion to the British
Commonwealth Colonbo Plan in
1962. Britain is another mainstay
of that program which spent $1.8
billion in 1961-62, chiefly for
countries of Southeast Asia.
Britain's bilateral expenditures
were expected to reach $500 mil-
lion in the 1963 fiscal year. They
were concentrated in Kenya, Tan-
ganyika, Uganda, Nyasaland, Ni-
geria and northern Rhodesia in
Africa; Jamaica, India and Paki-
stan.
Contributors
Excluding its contributions to
multilateral programs, France dis-
tributed $879 million in grants
and loans during 1962, the greater
share going to Algeria. The next
largest share went to the 14 newly
independent African and Malagasy
states. After that there were con-
tributions to Morocco, Tunisia,
Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam, French
overseas departments and some
countries in Latin America and
Asia.
West Germany disbursed the
equivalent of.$277 million in 1962
on all forms of economic aid to
developing countries, exclusive of
contributions to the United Na-
tions and Common Market funds,
and reparations payments.
Soviet figures are shadowy.
Firom best report the Soviet Un-
ion has aid agreements for tech-
nical assistance in industrializa-
tion with 29 developing countries.
The United Nations estimates the
total committed in 1962 at the
equivalent of about $400 million

"although the amount disbursed
may be less," it says.
The UN survey cites Soviet aid
to build more than 480 industrial
plants of various sorts in India,
Indonesia. Afghanistan, United
Arab Republic, Iraq, Syria, Ghana,
Guinea, Somalia, Mali and Sudan
among them.
European Support
The major European donor na-
tions, along with the United
States, Canada and Japan, also
distribute aid through the De-
velopment Assistance Committee
(DAC) of the Organization for
Economic Cooperation and De-
velopment. Other members are
Belgium, Denmark, France, West
Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Nor-
way, Portugal and Britain.
Belgium spent $68.5 million in
1962 on economic aid, much of it
to Congo Leopoldville.
Canada's total expenditure in
aid in 1962 was $37.5 million, of
which the biggest portion went to
such Latin American countries.
Japan's bilateral aid expendi-

ture in 1962 was $94 million with
Asian members of the Colombo
Plan and some Latin American
countries as beneficiaries.
Of the remaining DAC members,'
the Netherlands devoted $42 mil-
lion in 1962 to economic aid on
a bilateral basis, Portugal $40.7,
million, and Italy, Denmark and
Norway somewhat lesser amounts.
Denmark and Norway channel
most of their aid funds throughl
the United' Nations.
Common Market
The Common Market also has
set up economic help plans. One
is an investment bank for loans
to develop areas of continental
Europe, such as southern Greece.
The .other, the Fund for Economic
Development, has given more than
85 per cent of its $581 million
fund to countries and territories
in the French franc area.
By 1962 five countries which had
received the most benefit from the
fund were Cameroon, Malagasy
Republic, Ivory Coast, Algeria and
Senegal.

r

Union-League Creative Arts Festival
presents
W, 4 .SNQ!1...GX A SS
PULITZER PRIZE WINNER IN POETRY
and Author of "Heart's Needle" and other poems

You are invited to attend a seminar
Contemporary Political Thought:
The Issues and Problems
hosted by the U of M Phileutherian Society
TODAY
Seminar-Vandenberg Rm., Michigan League
9:00-9:30 A.M. Registration-Coffee
9:30-10:45 A.M. Dr. Hauptmann, chairman of the department of
political science at Park College, Parkville, Mo.,
Realism and Absolutes in Political Thought
11:00-12:15 P.M.Dr. Tonsor, assistant professor of history at
the U of M, Conservatives and Social Responsibility
1:30-2:45 P.M. Dr. Niemeyer: Two Sociaysms
3:00-4:15 P.M. Dr. Hauptmann: Stereotypes of Contemporary
American Political Thought

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School,
a fully accredited University of
Arizona program, conducted in co-
operation with professors from
Stanford University, University of
California, and Guadalajara, will
offer June 29 to August 8, art,.
folklore,. geography, history, Ian-
g4*ge and literature courses. Tui-
tion, board and room is $265.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, P.O. Box
7227, Stanford, Calif.

Sunday,

March ,8

Question Period Following

8:00 P.M.
League Ballroom

Admission Free

.:.

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CHlURCH

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ge neration
THE CAMPUS INTER-ARTS MAGAZINE

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
30'6 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Rev. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Services at 9:30 a.m. and
11:00 a.m.-Sermon: "Kierkegoard: Man
on His Own"; first in a series of four ser-
mons on "Toward the Discovery and the
Healing of the Soul."
U-M Student Group, 7:30 p.m.-Dr. Myron
Wegman, Dean of the School of Public
Health, will speak on population studies.
Sunday Evening Forum-Mr. Donald Ferrier
of the Detroit Vocational Rehabilitation
Project will discuss problems in the Detroit
slums.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service.t
11:00 a.m. Worship Service & Communion.
7:00 p.m. Choral Vespers by Choir, Soloists
and instrumentalists - Compositions by
Lassus, Graun and Barbar.
WEDNESDAY - 7:15 p.m. Studies in the
Christian Faith. "The Holy Spirit - The
- Church."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Woshtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm,
Brown, Virgil Jonssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services--
Call NO 2-2756

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jeon Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.--
"The Covenant of Moral Law" - Dr.
Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar -Major Reli-
gions of the World, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Liturgical Art, Susanne Swibold.
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m. - Drama, Reading Group, Jean
Robe's apartment.
8:30-11:00 p.m.--Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast, Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads,. Pine Room. Sup-
per and program, Liturgical Art, Susanne
Swibold.
7:0 p.m.-Cell Group, Gene Ransom's office.
THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.--Class: Christian Dating, Court-
ship and Marriage, Green Room.

Featuring:

Carl Oglesby
Lynn Coffin
F. H. Bergman,

MARCH 14, 1964
ODETTA!!!

Figure Compositions by:

Franklin Ettenberg

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services 9:30 and 11:15S a.m. "Do You Un-
derstand Me?" Dr. Fred E. Luchs
Bible Forum, 10:30-11:00 a.m., Dr. David K.
Felbeck
Church School, ages crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11:15 a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
For transportation call NO 8-7048,
9:30 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m. Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age..

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, Sermon
by Vicar Koenig, "The Exemplary Suf-
ferer."
Sunday at 11:15: Bible Study
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Organization, Supper-Program..
Showing of movie, "The Gift."
Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. and at 10:00 p.m.
Lenten Services, "What Is Truth?" (Com-
munion in 10 o'clock service)

~. -w#~

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