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March 01, 1964 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-01
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Map Shows ear-Campus iving rea

i

SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 1,1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

This Ann Arbor development offers low-rental housing to many University married
Medium-Cost Housing Possible

By RAYMOND HOLTON
There aren't enough houses orI
apartments to meet the demand
'n Ann Arbor for "moderate in-1
,ome housing."
This is the conclusion of Ann
Arbor citizens and civic groups
which have undertaken the re-
sponsibility to develop such hous-
ing.
These groups are taking advan-
tage of a federal program design-
ed to "assist in meeting the
housing needs of low and moder-
ate income and displaced families."
This is the purpose set forth in
section 221 (d) (3) of the Na-
tional Housing Act.
DemandI
Such a program is very much in
demand here in Ann Arbor. Ann
Arbor has a large population of
families who cannot afford to pay

more than $90-100 monthly for
housing. Among these are gradu-
ate students with families and at-
tending the University.
Also, Ann Arbor has a large
portion of what can be termed
moderate to low-income families,
consisting largely of Negroes who
find doors to some housing facii-
ties closed..
Displaced Families
Finally there is a group which
can be termed "displaced." This
group consists of families whose
homes have been torn down to
make room for the centrally-locat-
ed luxury apartment buildings.
Members of the community who
have taken it upon themselves
to aid in beginning moderate in-
come housing say it is these
groups in which they are concern-

There is definitely a need for
moderate income housing as evi-
denced by a recent project estab-
lished in Ypsilanti.
The 200-unit apartment project
called Willow Village draws more
than half its residents from Ann
Arbor. One of the project's initia-
tors, Mrs. Anatol Rapaport, posed
the question: "If there isn't a de-
mand for low income housing in
Ann Arbor then why do those who
have jobs in the city travel the
thirty-mile round-trip between
Ann Arbor and Willow Village?"
Instead of developing projects
similar to Willow Village, Ann
Arbor is currently the scene of
luxury apartment buildings which
rent from $150-200 per month.
These apartments go over big
with University students who bud-
dy-up to defray the high rent.
Independent Students
These apartments are fine for
"independent students," since they
really could be classified as "cam-
pus housing."
High land costs in the central
Ann Arbor area prevent such low
income projects from being con-
structed. These projects are only
eligible for the FHA aid if the land
cost is no more than 10 per cent
of the total project cost. This
makes it impossible to construct
such projects in the campus area
for the University student body's
benefit.
Aside from the graduate-student
families, there are a number of
families who live outside Ann Ar-
bor but work in the city. The
number of these families has been
estimated at 9000. A large major-
ity of them would like to live in
the city.
It has also been estimated that
more than 750 Negro families
would like to move into the city,
but cannot because of high hous-
ing costs.
Concrete Action
It takes more concrete action
and initiative to supply the impe-
tus for building a housing project
which can take advantage of fed-
eral aid.

Another group, the Conference
on Religion and Race, is currently
studying the problem. However, the
actual initiative for such projects
usually comes from private groups.
Qualifying for the federal aid is,
as usual, a complicated thing to
do. Some of the requirements are:
-The community must have a
"workable program." This means
that the community has an official

.
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plan for dealing effectively
slums and blighted areas.
Five Units
--Projects may be either
construction or rehabilitated
struction and must contain
or more dwelling units.

with
new
con-
five

I

five

This map of the central campus and surrounding area highlights streets for apartment hunting.
.::..""*.*..........*"*.*......*...... .*v**v.*.*.**.******"**.*"...*.*.*.*.** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
East Side-West SideJ
all Round Campus Town .. .
I Person? 2 Persons?
3 Persons? 4?
Some of our units , min
a c c o in n o d a t e m o res4 )
Apartment? House? Graduate Students
Room? Lot? Teaching Staff
Consult us now to Live on Canspus
find your spot cut time in half
Modern Brick Buildings
Birch Kitchens
with disposals
and exhaust fans4
Laundry facilities
Off Street parking space
;'.J
Attention Summer Students: We do have air conditioned and other sublets for snuuner occupancy
CAMPUS MANAGEMENT
662-7787EVES
DAYS -,A668-9064
.; «": ":>: .. " . s" "' "S:.r":.. . :r :....;;J ...5.d .:r. , .J, ,,:...;;x,,. . ,. r.. ...:...

OVER 60
TO CH OC
On Campus or
Furnished or
Student ao
Summer ao
if there is an aF
your need we
Wv2vFilson *0
602 First Noth

HOUSING PROJECT-This moderate income housing project,
serves families, including many University married students.
Projects like this can use the aid of the federal government which
was made possible by an amendment to the Federal Housing Act.
More projects similar to this would help house people who can
afford to pay $90-100 monthing. Several local groups are looking
into the federal program.

Days NO 5-9121

NOW RENTING FOR SUMME
1000 OAKLAND A

FACULTY and STUDENTS
We Welcome You
Visit the Towers and make it your new home. You must see the
model suites to apreciate their beauty. Studio, 1-2 and 3-bedroom
apts. are available at reasonable rates. Furnished or Unfurnished.
You con live and study in a relaxing atmosphere. Heated swim-
ming pool, sun decks, air-conditioning, recreation rooms, ample
parking, laundry, facilities and bus service to campus.
We offer you country club surroundings odjocent to the Municipal
golf course and the North Campus.
JURON
OWERS
2200 r4Ier Road, Ann Arbo, NO 3-08MX
Vo e AamntsOpeis Dal i10-71 satsuyd110-6 Suay . N4

NEW-DIFFERENT-DISTIN(
Quiet Residential Settinc
a Few 2 and 3 Bedroom Furnished and U
Apts. Still Available-From $1

Drive by, or Phone 453-3287

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