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February 22, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-22

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 7

1AUDAFERAY12116 HEMCHGNDAL PG'

Turkish Premier
scapes Assassin
Inonu Calm as Attacker Arrested,
Assures Nation of His Well-Being
ANKARA, Turkey tA') - A Turk dashed up to Premier Ismet
Inonu yesterday and fired three revolver shots at him from approxi-,
mately 12 feet away, then was overpowered by security guards. Inonu
was not hit.
The bullets sniashed into Inonu's official car as he sat in it in
front of his office in downtown Ankara, ready to drive off to attend
a session of parliament. The 79-year-old political veteran remained

ISMET INONU
QUIT EARLY:
Legislators.

ApproveBill
On Teachers
By The Associated Press
LANSING - With Senate Re-
publicans agreed on supporting
the generalities of Gov. George W.
Romney's budget, the Legislature
held its first Friday session of the
year yesterday.
The House, however, staged a
rebellion and adjourned before
noon following an attempt to
round up absentee legislators with
the assistance of state police.
The rebellion, against the miss-
ing legislators resulted in several
bills being voted down simply be-
cause. their sponsors were not
present.
Contact Absentees
Fer the first time this year, the
chamber was operating under a
"call of the House," which means
that absent members must be con-
tacted and brought in. The "call"
ended automatically when the 68
legislators present voted its early
adjournment.
On Thursday, Republican lead-
ers >of both. chambers predicted
the Legislature will pass a man-
datory statewide teacher tenure,
law this year rather than risk its
being adopted by voters in a ref-
erendum.
Romney Consent
They indicated, additionally,
that the proposal will go before
lawmakers with the implied en-
dorsement of Romney.
This would mean any future
changes in the law also could be
made only through referendum.
If zhe Legislature passes the law,
it would retain its power to amend
or repeal it.
Home Rule
A further consideration facing
state lawmakers is a bill to carry
out the new Michigan Constitu-
tion's county home rule provisions.
Now before the Senate Municipali-
ties Committee, the measure was
introduced by Democratic and Re-
publican leaders Wednesday.
The leaders said, however, they
doubted there would be any legis-
lative agreement on county home
rule this year.
It would permit .voters in a
county to adopt a charter abol-
ishing the constitutional offices of
sheriff, prosecutor, clerk, treasur-
er, register of deeds, and drain
commissioner.

"calm-as security guards whisked
the assassin away from angry
crowds, and later told the nation
he is "hale and sound and at the
service of the nation.
Held by Police
Held as the assassin is Mesut
Suna, 38, described by police as a
foe of Inonu's government. Suna
is foreman of a power station in
the Kayseri district, 165 miles
southeast of Ankara. He had been
trying to make an appointment to
see Inonu.
Suna is reported by police to
have shouted, "I hope I kill him!"
as he opened fire. "It would be for
the good of the country."
A veteran of Turkey's angry
politics, a man who helped Kemal
Ataturk found modern Turkey,
Inonu taped a broadcast that was
aired over the state radio.
Gives Reaction
The premier commented:
"Nothing happened to me. I saw a
man I did not know fire at me
from a distance of three to four
meters. There are three bullet
holes in my car. The attacker was
apprehended by security men who
managed to save him from the
hands of an angry group of my
fellow citizens who on hearing the
shots had immediately gathered
in front of my office."
Security police said the attacker
used a Belgian-made revolver.
It was reported that Suna called
at Inonu's office about 11 a.m.
and told secretaries he wanted an
appointment with the premier to
discuss a private matter. He was
told Inonu was engaged for the
day and could not receive him.
The man hung around.
Leaves Office
Toward noon, Inonu left his of-
fice to go to the assembly. He al-
ready was in his small car when
Suna was seen to dash out of the
building entrance and start shoot-
ing.
Two veteran security officers'
seized and disarmed him. Police
said they found two bullets inside
the car and three holes in the car
body. Investigation is proceeding,
police said.
Witnesses said the premier was
unruffled as he drove off to the
nearby parliament building. On
his arrival, the assembly gave him
an ovation.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
LIBREVILLE, Gabon-President
Leon Mba of Gabon appealed yes-
terday for unity to heal the
wounds of that West African na-
tion's abortive military coup.
"We have been through a ter-
rible trial," the 62-year-old chief
executive said in a radio broad-
cast from Libreville. "May this in-
cite us to reunite ourselves and
find together the paths of national
union."
* * *
SAIGON - South Viet Nam's
government announced in Saigon
yesterday a special court will try
Maj. Gen. Dang Sy on a charge
he ordered troops to fire on a
Buddhist demonstration at Hue
last May 8.
That incident, in which eight
demonstrators wer killed, touched
>ff the political-religious crisis that
marked the closing months of
President Ngo Dinh Diem's regime.
ODESSA, U.S.S.R.-The Ameri-
can freighter Exilona arrived here
yeseterday with the first cargo of
United States wheat for the Soviet
Union.

Bill Calls
i a s
For Party
Overaul
LANSING (A') - Sweeping over-
haul of the structure of political
parties' state central committees,
with stronger roles assumed by
elected officials, is proposed in a
bill introduced in the Legislature.
The bill, sponsored by Rep. Rus-
sell Strange (R-Clare) would put
legislators for the first time on
the state central committee, the.
policy-making bodies of the par-
ties.
Strange, chairman of the House
Elections Committee, drafted the
bill after polling GOP officials
around the state.
Strange's bill is designed to re-
shape the party structure to pro-
vide for "more cohesiveness," GOP
State Chairman Arthur Elliott Jr.
said.
Michigan Republicans have been
troubled in recent months by what
some describe as "communications
problems" between the party or-
ganization and its legislators.
At present, the state central
committees of the two parties are
composed of four persons - two
men and two women - from each
of the state's 19 congressional dis-
tricts.
Strange's plan would enable
both parties in the Legislature to
elect one House member and one
Senator to their state central
committees.
Other members would include
three from each congressional dis-
trict.
Ex-officio members would in-
clude: national committeemen,
national committeewomen, con-
gressional district chairmen, coun-
ty chairmen and vice-chairmen
from counties over one million
people.
In multi-county congressional
districts, one county chairman and
vice-chairman would be named.
His plan also calls for nine at-
large members to be chosen by the
state chairman.

bership of some 13.5 million.
But the big union has run into
resistance and one major reason
is "snob appeal," according to an
article in the labor department's
Monthly Labor Review, and an
AFL-CIO spokesman agrees.
'Another Machine Operator'
"Snob appeal is definitely one
reason," the union spokesman said.
"But it's fading as fast as the boss
puts machines into the office and
the white collar worker becomes
just another machine operator."
The Labor Review article, by
Albert A. Blum, lays the blame at
labor's own door for its past fail-
ure to organize the man who goes
to work in white collar and tie.
Backfire
He cited examples of unions or-
ganizing literature that told white
collar clerks that they weren't
earning as much as janitors.
The AFL-CIO concedes its dif-
ficulties in organizing white collar
workers, but believes that auto-
mation in the office, as well as on
the production line, with mount-
ing job security fears is driving
workers into the arms of labor.
Gray to Blue
"They are convinced that auto-
mation and technological change
are so altering the nature of white
collar work that the white collar
is now gray and will soon turn
blue."
Large numbers of teachers, gov-
ernment employes, hotel and res-
taurant workers and others are
being signed up, the union spokes-
man said.
"White collar organizing is in-
creasing, but not as fast as we
would like it to."

Panamanian
Publishers
Plan AMeeting
PANAMA (A)-Steps that could
lead to a softening of Panama's
so far unyielding position in itsI
Canal Zone dispute with the Unit-
ed States will be discussed at a
meeting announced yesterday by
Panamanian publishers.
The Monday session would in-
clude Panamanian President Ro-
berto Chiari, whose family owns
two newspapers, including the
tabloid La Prensa.
Agreement on a program of ac-
tion could result in the first breach
of Panamanian unity since Chiari
broke off relations with the United
States in the aftermath of Janu-
ary anti-United States rioting.
May Clash
Any such breach, however, could
bring a clash between ultranation-
alists and more conservative Pan-
amanian elements.
There were influential Pana-
manians who expressed doubt the
publishers will be able to convince
the president's advisors to agree
to reshape the country's Canal
policy at tl.s stage.
Since the Jan. 9-10 rioting there
has been a steady and sometimes
violent. anti-United States tone in
nearly all newspapers.
Only 348 Hours
left before the
MONTE CARLO
BALL
March 7, 9-1
Union Ballroom
Dancing
Gambling
$2.50 per couple

WHITE COLLAR DRIVE:
AFL-CIO Starts Push
For New Members
By NEIL GILBRIDE
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON-The AFL-CIO, faced with alarming membership
losses in its industrial unions, is embarked on a major effort to
gather up the unorganized 14 million white collar workers.
It's potentially a fertile field-made up of teachers, government
employes, clerks and office workers of all kinds-and is larger
than the AFL-CIO's entire mem-

(Second in a Four-Part Series)
By JEFF GREENFIELD
Collegiate Press Service
JAKARTA-If the students of
Southeast Asia find political par-
ticipation discouraged, the stu-
dents of Indonesia treat it as a
duty.
When President Sukarno assum-
ed complete political power in 1959,
all political factions - at least
nominally - rallied behind him.
Indonesian political theorists con-
tinually stress that under Sukarno
all groups-nationalist, religious,
military, Communist-have a role
to play in "building Indonesian
nationhood."
The student organizations are
part of this unity of interests. Di-
vided into two principal groups,
both national student organiza-
tions work within the political
structure and actively support Su-
karno's regime. Fundamental dis-
sent from the "five pillars" of the
national revolution-the primary
slogan of Sukarno's policies - is
neither heard nor tolerated.
MMI Key
The principal student group is
the MMI, composed of member
student councils from Indonesian
universities. The MMI has consid-
erable influence because it is con-
sidered the voice of the student;
and the student is an equal part
of the Indonesian nation.
The organization works closely
with university officials in pro-
moting the policies of the govern-
ment (the national MMI president,
still a student, is vice-rector of the
University of Indonesia). When
rare student-administration dif-
ferences arise, the students gen-i
erally have a strong say in thei
resolution.
This student power is a direct

I . .

Politics Grips Indonesia Youth

AHMED SUKARNO

result of Sukarno's systematic at-
tempt to use social institutions to
advance his own policies. Schools,
in the words of the minister of
higher education, are "tools of the
the revolution"; and the students
and administration are equals in
terms of political strength.
Also PPMI
In addition to the MMI, a na-
tional group of youth and student
organizations exists, called the
PPMI. This organization is com-
posed of groups of an extra-curric-
ular or off-campus nature, as op-
posed to the MMI which is formed
out of student governments.
The army, the nationalist and'
Communist youth groups, and re-
ligious organizations all are part
of the PPMI. Apparently the Com-
munists exercise somewhat more
control over this group than they
do over the MMI, which is more,

I

directly tied to the university sys-
tem.
At present, all these divergent
groups profess loyalty to Sukarno.
In the past, both ultra-religious
groups and the Communists have
bolted Sukarno's policies, but have
returned to the fold. Should the
coalition again fail, or when Su-
karno leaves the political scene
(he is 61 years old), the PPMI
with its Communist secretariat is
the more likely of the two youth
groups to ally with any one fac-
tion.
The student leaders in Indonesia
take their politics seriously. Edu-
cation is often subordinated to
work in student affairs. For exam-
ple, MMI's national leader has
been attending college for 12 years
and has not graduated yet. A stu-
dent official in East Java simply
dropped out of school to tour the
United States.
Because of the importance at-
tached to student movements by
the government, professors will-
ingly postpone or cancel examina-
tions to fit the student leader's
schedule, albeit with occasional
grumblings about the point of a
college education.
Indonesia is a country which is
constantly mobilized politically.
The government under Sukarno
makes it a point to whip up pop-
ular support for every key do-
mestic and foreign policy of the
regime. And it is the uniquely po-
litical nature of this socialist, non-
aligned society that has brought
student politics to a level of equal-
ity with other more traditional po-
litical forces.
In Indonesia, in sum, the stu-
dent is a political animal. His par-
ticipation-limited to the support
of a no-party, one-program re-
gime is expected and encouraged,

it

I i

if U-,

(Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!"
and "Barefoot Boy With Cheek.")

EVOL SPELLED BACKWARDS IS LOVE
They met. His heart leapt. "I love you !" he cried.
"Me too, hey !" she cried.
"Tell me," he cried, "are you a girl of expensive tastes?"
"No, hey," she cried. "I am a girl of simple tastes."
"Good," he cried, "for my cruel father sends me an allowance
barely large enough to support life."
"Money does not matter to me," she cried. "My tastes are
simple; my wants are few. Just take me riding in a long, new,
yellow convertible and I am content."
"Goodbye," he cried, and ran away as fast as his little
stumpy legs would carry him, for he had no yellow convertible,
nor the money to buy one, nor the means to get the money-
short of picking up his stingy father by the ankles and shak-
ing him till his wallet fell out.
He knew he must forget this girl, but lying on his pallet at
lie dormitory, whimpering and moaning, he knew he could not.
At last an idea came to him: though he did not have the
coney to buy a convertible, perhaps he had enough to rent one I
Hope reborn, he rushed on his little stumpy legs (curious to
ell, he was six feet tall, but all his life he suffered from little
Lumpy legs) he rushed, I say, to an automobile rental company
and rented a yellow convertible for $10 down plus ten cents a
mile. Then, with many a laugh and cheer, he drove away to
pick up the girl.
"Oh, bully !" she cried when she saw the car. "This suits my
aimple tastes to a 'T.' Come, let us speed over rolling highroads
.1nd through bosky dells."
Away they drove. All that day and night they drove and
finally, tired but happy, they parked high on a wind-swept hill.
"Marlboro?" he said.
"Yum, yum," she said.
They lit their Marlboros. They puffed with deep content-
ment. "You know," he said, "you are like a Marlboro-clean
and fresh and relaxing."
"Yes, I am clean and fresh and relaxing," she admitted.
"But, all the same, there is a big difference between Marlboros
and me, because I do not have an efficacious white Selectrate
filter."
They laughed. They kissed. He screamed.
"What is it, hey?" she asked, her attention aroused.
"Look at the speedometer," he said. "We have driven 200
miles, and this car costs ten cents a mile, and I have only
$20 left."
"But that is exactly enough," she said.
"Yes," he said, "but we still have to drive home."
"Oh," she said. They fell into a profound gloom. He started
the motor and backed out of the parking place.
"Hey, look!" she cried. "The speedometer doesn't move when
you are backing up."
Helooked. It was true. "Eureka!" he cried. "That solves
m.rhlom T will drive hnme in reverse. Then no more miles

4

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ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY--
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11 :00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Sermon: Guest Speaker, Dr. Stanley Schuman
on~"Public Health: From Childbed Fever
to Smoking."
U-M Student Group: 7:30 p.m. Prof. Charles
Lehmann on "Student Passion." Bus ser-
vice available.
Sunday Evening Forum: 8:00 p.m. Prof. Wesley
Maurer will speak on "The Fight Against
Poverty."
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. "When You
Marry," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Forum: 10:30 a.m., Mrs. Harriet Cram-
ton.
Church School, ages crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11:15a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M.-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894
SUNDAY-
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m. Training Union.
7:30 p.m. Evening Worship.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Meeting in Room 528D
in basement of S.A.B-
Wednesday-7:30 p.m. Devotions.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CH APEL
(National Lutheran Council)
H ill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. (Communion) Worship
Services.
7:00 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Arthur Johnson-
Medical School Faculty.
WEDNESDAY, 7:15 p.m. Studies in the Chris-
tain Faith, "God and His World."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services--
Call NO 2-2756

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.
"Mount Sinai-Covenant of Moral Law"-'
Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar. Major Religious of the
World-Islam. Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. - Worship and Program. Fred
Stoerker, "Ecumencial Encounter in Serv-
ice."
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m.-Study Group: Religious Issues in
Drama.
8:30 p.m.-Open House-Jean Robe's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m-HolyCommunion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast, Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6-8 p.m.-Wesley Grads: Supper and social
evening. Pine Room.
THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.-Class: Christian Dating, Court-
ship and Marriage, Green Room.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.--=Young Marrieds. Supper in the
Pine Room.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. - Services,
with Holy Communion. Sermon, "The Chief
Cornerstone."
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Bible Class begins
study of Augsburg Confession.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program, with talk on the theological writ-
ings of the late C. S. Lewis by Vicar John
Koenig.
Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. and at 10:00 p.m.-
Midweek Lenten Vespers.
Friday at 8:30-Fourth Friday Forum (Grad
Staff), talk on the treatment of suffering

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INTERESTED IN
WOMEN'S COOPS?
INTERCOOPERATIVE COUNCIL
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND AN
OPEN MEETING.
Sunday, Feb. 23 2:OC
HENDERSON ROOM
MICHIGAN LEAGUE

I

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West L iberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Commnion - Second Sunday of every

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