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February 20, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THlE MICHIGtAN DlAILY

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E

TRIMESTER EXPERIMENT:
Students View Shorter Term

t,. .,_.v_._

(Continued from page 1i

head, and little time if any for

wracking to take, and count less
of the total course grade. None of
these was true for me," another
senior commented.
Labeled 'Unfair'
A sophomore labeled it "unfair
to expect students to adequately
review and take a comprehensive
exam in four to six courses with-
in the period of one week."
Because University officials,
hearing such complaints, are ser-
ously considering some sort of
class-free "reading period" before
finals, The Daily's questionnaire
sought reactions /on this specific
proposal.
Opinions ranged from sopho-
more Barbara Laas' assertion that
the period is "essential," to the
prediction that "no one would
bother to 'read' anyway," ad-
vanced by Thomas G. Hackett, '65.
Object to Reading Period
There were other objections ad-
vanced by opponents of the read-
ing period.' "I would not favor
shortening the semester again,"
one sophomore remarked, while
Barbara A. Hoim, '64, insisted such
a period "would increase pressure
at final exams and place unwar-
ranted emphasis on the import-
ance of finals."
The questionnaire's reading
period proposal provoked several
other suggestions for juggling the
calendar to relieve pressures:
-A sophomore proposed that,
instead of reducing class meetings
to provide the reading period, "the
third week of Christmas vacation
could be cut out to provide the
time. A three week vacation is
nice, but I would much rather
4ave a two-week one, and a read-
ing period before filals."
Asks Abolition of Finals
-"A not too far-fetched plan
would be to abolish finals alto-
gether. The last week of classes
would test only the last one third
of the semester's work and only
count that much in the overall
grade for any course," Ronald Le-
Beau, '66, suggested.
-The number of class meetings
should be reduced, a senior wrote.
"This gained time would be put to
better use by making the exam it-
self longer and by reducing the
number of exams scheduled each
day. Some people prefer to study
for one test after they have gotten
another out of the way."
-Another senior said that
"thanksgiving recess should be
extended to include the entire
week of Thanksgiving, thus allow-
ing time to complete larger proj-
ects such as papers and lab re-
Ports."
Suggests Discussion Period
-Instead of a reading period,
Evelyn Falkenstein, '66, suggested,
the University should "continue
classes, without the presentation
of new material, as a discussion
Hannah Hits
MSU Critics
(Continued from Page 1)
He cited an earlier statement
by the MSU Board of Trustees
which said:
"It is understood that this board
has no intention to organize the
beginning of a medical school un-
til after the schools at the Uni-
versity and Wayne are fully de-
veloped, but feels that at the time
it' is decided to instigate a third
publicly supported medical school
in Michigan, it should be a part
of Michigan State University."
A two-year, non-clinical pro-'
gram in human medicine is sched-
uled to begin at MSU in the fall
of 1965. This is the program term-
ed by some critics "a foot in the
door" for an eventual four-year
medical school.
Hannah last month predicted a
full medical program at MSC-
but as much as 15 or 20 years in
the future.

A committee named by the
Michigan Coordinating Council for
Higher Education recommended
that the MSU program be limited
to 18 months. Students would then
transfer to the University and
Wayne for their final six months.
DIAL
2-6264 0
Shows 1:20-3:40-6:10 & 8:45

period. Such a period would round
out the independent study of the
final-exam period by giving the
student an opportunity to air
questions that arise from the final
study and co-ordination of the
course. The entire course would
then be co-ordinated, so that the
final exam need not be weighted
on thelast part of the semester.
Attendance during this period
would be voluntary; those having
nothing to discuss would not need
to attend."
Pressures and grades aside, the
question remains: what did tri-
mester do to education itself? The
survey's respondents, as a group,
felt it had little effect. But a few
added gloomy remarks.
"This was the first semester at
the University in which I studied
merely for exams and not because
I enjoyed learning. I resent assem-
bly-line educational methods," one
senior complained.
No Time for Contemplation
A sophomore, though indicating
a mild preference for the new sys-
tem, claimed "there was not
enough time to think about what
you were cramming into your

creative thinking or projects."
Rubert G. Pachella, '66, report-
ed feeling "a great indifference to-
ward my work at the end of the
semester, going into finals" be-
cause there was "so much work in
the last two weeks."
Charles Kacir, '65A&D, warned
that the trimester may create
problems for future student gen-
enations. "There are students, I
for one, who probably would not
have survived the period of ad-
justment to the University if it
had been on the new calendar." 1
Kabaker, however, pointed to
the other side of this coin. "Pretty
soon the present upperclassmen
will be gone and there will be left
only 'trimester babies'." These
people, he argued, will go through
the University never having known

1

WUS Head
To Describe
Student Aid
By KAREN KENAH
Makota Fujita, executive direc-
tor of World University Service, is
visiting the campus today to in-
form students of the role of WUS
in Southeast Asia and Japan.
His schedule will involve lunch
at Guild House, a tea at the In-
ternational Center at 4:15 p.m.
and a discussion, "Japanese Stu-
dents Face a Changing Asian
World," at 7:30 p.m. in the Multi-
purpose Room of the UGLI.
His visit is part of a widespread
effort by WUS to inform Univer-
sity students of the acute problems
facing students in other parts of
the world today. WUS was orga-
nized after World War I to help
students all over the globe.

anything but trimester, never hav- Student Aids
ing experienced such tension-cut- WUS gives aid ranging from gifts
ting features as studying during of medicine to lodging, to aid for
Christmas vacation. better educational facilities.
And the first group of "trimes- The University branch of WUS,
ter babies"-the current freshman though present on campus for sev-
class-is here now,. eral years, has been permanently
TOMORROW: A SURVEY organized this year with the help
of the Council for Student Reli-
OF FRESHMAN OPINION gious Organizations. It is compris-
ed of members from every ma-

The Daily Official Bulletin is
An official publication of the Uni-
versity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumesno edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
cedingf publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Day Calendar
Mental Health Research Institute -
Eugene B. Brody, chairman, Dept. of
Psychiatry, Univ. of Maryland, "In-
vestigating Sociocultural Elements of
Mental Illness": Main Conference Room,
Mental Health Research Institute, 2:15
p.m.
Center for Russian Studies and School
of Education Lecture-George Kline, As-
soc. Prof. of Russian and Philosophy,
Bryn Mawr, "Science and Philosophy
in Soviet Russia": Multipurpose Room,
Undergrad Lib., 4:10 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Jacques Feyler's "Car-
nival in Flanders," plus short, "Picnic":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
World Univ. Service Committee Lee-
ture-Makoto Fujita, executive secre-
tary of World Univ. Service in Japan,
'Japanese Students in a Changing As-
ian World": Multi-purpose Room, Un-
dergrad Lib., 7:30 p.m.
Univ. Musical Society Extra Series -
Vienna Symphony Orchestra, wolfgang
Swallisch, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30
p.m.
American Chemical Society Lecture-
"Alkyl, Cycloalkyl and Aryl Carbonium
Ions," Dr. George Olah, Dow Chemical
Co. of Canada, 8 p.m., Room 1300 Chem-
istry Bldg.
Statistics Seminar: Prof. P. Dwyer-
'On the Use of Incomplete Prior In-
formation in Regression Analysis," 3201
Angell Hall, 4 p.m.
Anatomy Seminar - Joseph Meites,
Dept. of Physiology & Pharmacology,
Mich. State Univ., "Central Nervous
System Control of Prolactin and Growth
Hormone Secretion": 2501 E. Medical
Bldg. at 4 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for George
Frank Votruba, Mathematics; thesis:
"On Generalized Inverses and Singular
Equations in Functional Analysis," 3227
Angell Hall, at 5 p.m. Chairman, Lam-
berto Cesari.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Soon-
sung Hong, Electrical Engrg., on "Ap-
plication of Conformal Mapping in High
Frequency Scattering," at 4 p.m. in
Room 246 W. Engrg.
Refreshments in Room 350 W. Engrg.
at 3:30 p.m.

Feb. 21, from 3 to 5 p.m. in Room 2208
Angell Hall.
50 Paid Subjects Wanted for psycho-
Logical experiment for 12 hours at $1.25
per hour. Sign up at 3435 Mason Hall or
Call Univ. Ext. 2144 between 10-12 each
day.
Spring Semester Fees: At least 50 per
cent is due and payable on or before
Feb. 28, 1964.
Non payment of at least 50 per cent
by Feb. 28 will result in the assess-
ment of a delinquent penalty of $5.00.
Payments may be made incperson
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015
Admin. Bldg., before 4:30 p.m., Fri.,
Feb. 28, 1964.
MAIL EARLY,
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, Feb. 28, are late and subject to
penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition and
show student number and name.
Physical Education-Women Students:
Women students taking required physi-
cal education who were medically de-
ferred for the first half of this semes-
ter should report torOffice 15, Barbour
Gym to sign up for their spring ac-
tivity. Registration will be held from
8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m., Feb. 20-
27. Upperciass students who wish to
elect physical ed. classes may do so on
Wed., March 25, Main Floor, Barbour
Gym.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Week-Feb. 24-29-Infor-
mation centers in the Union Lobby &
the Fihsbowl open daily from 8 a.m. to
10 p.m. Examinations will be given as
follows: Mon.-7 p.m.; Tues. through
Fri.-9-3-7; Sat. 9-12. On Tues.. Feb.
25 att7:30 p.m. a meeting will be held
in the Mich. Union Ballroom. All
persons interested in Peace Corps activi-
ties are urged to attend. Undergrads
interested in Peace Corps oppor. in the
future are most welcome. Questionnaires
are available at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3200 SAB, this week & interested
persons planning to take the exam
should pick up & complete one of these
now & submit it to the Peace Corps
rep. upon taking the test. Any orga-
nization, classorclub, & residence unit
wanting to have a Peace Corps rep.
speak & answer questions, may make
arrangements by calling the Bureau,
Ext. 3544, as early as possible.
SUMMERPLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
Summer Placement Service will be
open ONLY from 3 to 5 p.m. on Thurs.
(today) and Fri., Feb. 20 & 21. Mr. Pe-
terson willbe out of town those days.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Wadsworth Publishing Co., Inc., Bel-
mont, Calif.--Openings for Field Repre-
sentatives (sales). BA any field. Age 23-
32. Will call on college professors to
promote sales of books (approx. 60 per
cent of time) & develop manuscripts for
new books. Occasionally call on book-
stores. Oppor. for advancement to edi-

.K..erl::oJ.:l. ........ . . .
Y: ".1"r.Y::nY:....~....:r.i}::o.. ..... .. .. .':"sL....... . : .... ... . ... ,...... ........> 4... ..
rM +...... 44Y... 4J.. .... . .. re . ....,,h 4. ..!L. 4 .. . .".. M;4 r .."":::,

torial positions or mght. (Co. pro-
motes from within through field sales.)
Openings in Mich., Cleveland, Cinsin-
nati, Chicago & Minneapolis. Starting
date: now or summer.
American Red Cross, Ann Arbor-Case-
worekr (home service). Casework, group
work & counseling. Mostly military serv-
icemen's families, Will cover Washtenaw
County. Variety of work. BA degree,' so-
ciology pref., or other social science.
Exper. not required, but would like
someone with Red Cross exper. Require
permanent resident, one who has lived
in this area at least 2 yrs. will need
car later on. Career oppor. Good train-
ing.
Mono-Sol Div., Gary, Ind. - Ass't.
Controller-BBA (MBA or CPA pref.).!
3 yrs. exper. (public acc't..pref.). Age
25-30 approx. To learn the business &
become the Ass't. in charge of the Con-
trler's office. Work closely with pro-
uction. Assume variety of responsibili-
ties; accounting will be secondary. Work
includes making studies, taxes, budgets,
forecasts.
Michigan Civil Service-i) Vision Con-
sultant III-1 yr. grad trng. with spe-
cialization in instruction of the blind
or partially sighted or similar. 2) Bio-
chemist IV-PhD with specialization in
Biochemistry. Prefer 1 yr. exper. 3)
Practical Nurse Training Consultant IV
-MA in Nursing or Educ. 5 yrs. exper.
Apply for the above positions by March
2. Apply for the following positions by
Feb. 24: 1) Nutrition Consultant IIIA-
MA in foods & human nutrition, pub-
lic health nutrition or related. 1 yr.
exper. 2) State Dept. Officer II-Men-
BA & 2 yrs. field investigative or en-
forcement exper.
* * *
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule at 128-H west
Engrg. for appointments with the fol-
lowing:
FEB. 21-
Avco Corp., Electronics Div. - MS-

PhD: EE-(Electronics) & Physics. R.
& D., Des.
Marathon Paper . Div., American Can
Co., Neenah-Menasha, Wis.-BS: ChE,
IE & ME. Mayt & Aug. grads. R. & D.,
Des., Prod. & Ind. Engrg.
Parker-Hannifin Corp., Des Plaines,
Ili.-BS: IE & ME. May grads. Des. &
Prod. & Sales.
Sun Oil Co., Marcus Hook, Phila., Pa.,
Toledo, Ohio & Dallas, Tex.-BS-MS:
ChE & ME. BS: EE, E Math & E Physics.
May & Aug. grads. R. & D., Prod., Com-
puter Sys. & Applications, Tech. Eco-
nomic Analysis.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Cinema Guild, Film showing: Jacques
Feyder's "Carnival in Flanders," a
French ocmedy, Feb. 20-21, 7 and 9 p.m.,
Architecture Aud.
Foresters' Club, All campus Paul Bun-
yan Ball, Feb. 22, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
Michigan Union Ballroom.
Le Cercle Francais, Le Baratin, Feb.
20, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture by Dr. Dale Ihrie, "The Acid Test,"
Feb. 21, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union, 3rd
floor conference room.
* * *
Young Democrats, Endorsement inter-
views for SGC and NSA candidates,
Thurs., Feb. 20, 7-10 p.m., 3511 SAB.
*' * *
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Midweek worship, Feb.
20, 12:10 to 12:40 p.m., Douglas Me-
morial Chapel.
* * *
The Christian Science Organization at
U. of M., Testimonial meeting, Feb. 20,
7:30 p.m., Room 528-D, SAB.

L .

I. ,I

Survey of 'U' Students:
The Statistics
EDITOR'S NOTE: These are the indicated the amount of riseC
data from The Daily's survey of stu- fall the average grade-point 1a
dent opinion on the new academic
calendar. Questions are reproduced fall was .027 lower than the pr
verbatim from the questionnaire, as vious overall.
are the multiple-choice answers. The 5) Did you find that any of yoi
number in parentheses following each instructors had difficulty in ae
question is the number of students .tyio e he
responding to that particular item.) uting their courses to the ne
calendar? 1,177)
1) Prior to the beginning of last Yes, 59 per cent; no, 41 per cen
fall's term, what were your expee- 6) Do you prefer having the fa
tations concerning the new cal- term end before Christmas or con
endar? (193) tinuing into January? (193;
Expected academic pressures S t r o n g l y prefer endingf
would be much greater, 5 per cent; Christmas, 80 per cent; somewhf
expected academic p r e s s u r e s prefer ending at Christmas,1
would be somewhat greater, 49 per per cent; no preference, 1 p
cent; expected no significant dif- cent; somewhat prefer continuil
ferences, 29 per cent; expected into January, 3 per cent; strong
academic pressures would be ly prefer continuing into Januar
somewhat lighter, 3 per cent; ex- 3 per cent.
pected academic pressures' would
be much lighter, 0 per cent; no 7) Do you prefer last fall's on
particular expectations - hadn't week schedule of two-hour fin
thought about it, 14 per cent. exams to the former two-wee
* * * schedule . of .three-hour .finals
2) Looking back, would you say (184)
you had more or less difficulty Strongly prefer the two-wee
keeping up with your studies last three-hour system, 14 per cen
fall than in previous semesters? somewhat prefer the two-wee
(189)-three-hour system, 18 per cen
Much more trouble last fall, 17 no preference, 4 per cent; som
per cent; somewhat more trouble what prefer the one-week, tw
last fall, 35 per cent; no noticeable hour system, 26 per cent; strong
difference, 37 per cent; somewhat prefer- the one-week, two-hot
less trouble last fall, 9 per -cent; system, 38 per cent.
much less trouble last fall, 2 per.*
cent. 8) Would you favor the estal
If you did experience greater lishment of a one-week "readi
difficulty, do you feel you will be period"--eliminating the last wee
able to adjust adequately to the of classes to free students to r
new calendar now that you have view for finals - before exa
experienced one term under it? week? (193)
(107) Strongly favor it, 41 per cen
Yes, 73 per cent; uncertain, 22 somewhat favor it, 26 per cent; I
per cent; no, 5 per cent, preference, 9 per cent; somewhf
3) Compared to previous semes- opposed to it, 14 per cent; stron
ters, how well do you feel you mas- ly opposed to it, 11 per cent.
tered your courses last fall? (190)
Much better, 8 per cent; some- 9) All in all, which calendar
what better, 25 per cent; no sig- you prefer (189)
nificant difference, 41 per cent; Strongly prefer old semest
somewhat worse, 21 per cent; prefer old semester calendar,
much worse, 5 per cent.
..If you indicated a change, would cences;omewhatpreferencnewt2 p
you attribute this to the new cal- mester calendar, 37 per cen
endar? (115) strongly prefer new trimester cal
Yes, entirely, 0 per cent; it was endar, 51 per cent,
a major factor, 26 per cent; it was* * *
a minor factor, 38 per cent; nc, 36 Three hundred fifty question
per cent naires were mailed out to random
4) Was your grade-point aver- ly selected students during ti
age last fall higher or lower than first week of school. Five were re
your overall average from previous turned unopened and 193 we
semesters? 1165) answered. Fifty-six per centc
Higher, 53 per cent; lower, 47 the questionnaires which presun
per cent. For the 142 students who ably were received were answerer

jor . campus organization.
The committee is comprised of
both an educational and a sup-
portive branch. The former has
been active since November, giv-
ing talks and sponsoring lectures
to inform students of its activities.
01o Campus Drives

st
"e-
ir
S-
ew
nt.
all
n-
at
at
13
er
ng
g-
ry,
te-
al
1ek
Is?
k,
tr
k
t;
te-
lo-
rly
ur
b-
ng
*k
re-
1m
t;
no
tat
g-
do
,er
gat
ri-
1-
he
'e-
re
of

Thne supportive branch is spon-
soring two activities in the near
future, a Campus Pac Drive and
a Campaign Drive.
The Campus Pac Drive, sponsor-
ed in conjunction with Sphinx
Honorary, will devote a portion of
the funds raised to helping refu-
gee students. It will run from
February 24-26.
The Campaign Drive to be held
April 13-15 will sponsor various
activities to raise money directly
for WUS.
across
Campus
Prof. George Kline of Bryn
Mawr College will speak on "Sci-
ence and Philosophy in Soviet Rus-
sia" at 4:10 p.m. today in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
Vienna Orchestra.'..
The Vienna Symphony Orches-
tra, conducted by Wolfgang Sa-
wallisch, will perform at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Aud. The concert,
part of the University's Musical
Society's Extra Series, will in-
clude "Concerto Grosso, Op. 4, No.
10" by Locatelli, "Six Pieces for
Orchestra" by Webern, Schubert's
"Unfinished Symphony" and
"Macbeth" by Strauss.
Voice Endorsements...
Voice Political Party has endors-
ed the following candidates in the
March 4 Student Government
Council election: Barry Bluestone,
'66; Steven Berkowitz, '65; Stan-
ley Nadel, '66, and Richard Shortt,
'66.
TAKE YOUR FILMS &
SLIDES FOR QUALITY
PROCESSING TO
LLETS
PHOTO DEPARTMENT
RUSH SERVICE ALSO

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for
Gin eptaid
Program, Information

'1

For Other University Events
see the Across Campus column.

today

General Notices
Delta Delta Delta Scholarship Com-
petition: Unaffiliated or affiliated wom-
en students who will be juniors the fall
semester of 1964-65 and have a grade-
point average of 2.92 or better are eligi-
ble to apply. Application forms and
further information may be obtained
from Mrs. Florence Lyons, Office of
Financial Aids,( 2011 SAB. Applications
should be completed and returned to
the Office of Student Affairs by March
2. Scholarship grants will be based on
need, scholarship, and extra-curricular
participation.
Dept. of Philosophy: Make-up exam
for Philosophy 414 will be held Fri.,
CONTINENTAL
BOOKSTORE
330 Nickels Arcade
(over Blazo's)
CONTINENTAL
COOP BOOKSTORE
IS GOOD FOR YOU
All new books-10-20%
OFF
Folkway Records-1/2 OFF
Portable typewriters-almost cost
YEAR ROUND SBX
Artist's Gallery-Now Showing
Sue Hodges and Helen Cohen

"BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!",
"BEST ACTOR!" "BEST DIRECTOR!"
Albert Finney Tony Richardson'
-NEW YORK FILM CRITICS AWARD
The whole TO m
worldloves JoneS
THESE NEWSPAPER AND MAGAZINE REVIEWS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES!

) I

"A ROARING ENTERTAINMENT!
One of the wildest, bawdiest and funniest
comedies ever brought to the screen:'
- Bosley Crowt her, N. Y. Times'

I

I

SMOTHERS BROTHERS

"p

ilk

Saturday, Feb. 29, 8:00 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
BLOCK SALES:
Friday, Feb. 21, 8 A.M.-5 P.M.
GENERAL SALES:
Monday, Feb. 24-Friday, Feb. 28,
8 A.M.-5 P.M.
Saturday, Feb. 29, 1-8 P.M.

University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Presents

"ABSOLUTELY MAGNIFICENT!
LET THE GASPING CUSTOMERS
FALL WHERE THEY MAY!"
"THE BEST COMEDY EVER MADE
...AN ABSOLUTE TRIUMPH!N.wswe.k
"A GREAT MOVIE.A MASTERPIECE
...THRILLING, BAWDY, LUSTY!"
- Archer Winston, N. Y. Post
"**** A(HIGHEST RATING!)
DELECTABLE!" -Kate Cameron,N.Y.Daily News
"A STUNNING JOB... BROUGHT
THUNDERINGLY TO LIFE. ROIS-
TEROUS, RIBALD, ROMANTIC!"
Arthur Knight, Saturday Review
"'TOM JONES', WINS IN A ROMP!"
- Life Magazine'
"A WELL-NIGH PERFECT COMEDY
...10 TIMES AS FUNNY AS LIFE!"

John Hersey's

IL

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THE

DIAL
8-6416

1 alml6i

Ends Tonight
Shows at 7-9 P.M.

-

I

i

"A MARVELOUS
COMEDY !'" The New Yorker

CHILD -
BUYERS
A NEW PLAY by

"BRILLIANT! A
'TOM JONES'
WITH I.TAWAY I"

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I

STARRINGiD uiIC RWIH/D
ALBERT FIN NEYSU NAH , KHGHGIFIHEIH EVANS/JOAN GREEN WOOD/ATOM TONES,;
ALSO STARRM IUiV1u uc nc oeaveA tOC1t l1O-i~nenco!Tno

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1 tj'64 W Q; N&j r U U4 Vlj a

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