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February 16, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-16

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1904 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Reach Cease Fire
In Eastern Africa
Ethiopia, Somalia Seek Settlement
After Truce Arranged by Abboud
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (R) - A truce is to halt border warfare
between Ethiopia and Somalia at noon today under an agreement
announced yesterday.
A telegraphic exchange between President Ibrahim Abboud of
Sudan and Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia provided for the cease-
fire in 8-day-old hostilities that have aroused international concern.
Ministers of the Organization of African Unity, meeting in emer-
gency session at Dar Es Salaam, Tanganyika, had called for both
sides to end the shooting. They urged peace also in a similar frontier
Sdispute between Somalia and
u re!e .C rt Kena.Ends Propaganda Attacks

Receives Plans
To Redistrict
LANSING (R) - A Democratic
redistricting plan which could al-
low four counties to control the
legislature, and the Republican
counter - proposal, reached the
State Supreme Court Friday.
All four of the deadlocked Ap-
portionment Commission's Repub-
licans were agreed on their plan,
which is based solely on the new
Michigan Constitution.
The Democratic "one man, one
vote" scheme calls the 1963 State
Constitution self - contradictory
and relies partly on the principle
of "equal protection of the laws."
Court To Rule
Submission of the two proposals
set the stage for the high court to
rule on reapportionment-required
by the new constitution - soon
after March 2, the date for final
oral argument.
The Democratic plan raises the
mathematical possibility Wayne,
Oakland, Macomb and Genesee
Counties could elect majorities to
both the House and Senate.
The four neighboring southeast-
ern Michigan counties have more
than 4 million of the 7.8 million
Michigan residents counted in the
1960 census. They are the four
most populous of the 83 counties.
Gives 60 Seats

Acting as middleman, Abboud
notified Selassie that Premier Ab-
dirashid Ali Shermarke's Somali
government accepted the truce
and agreed also to end its propa-
ganda attacks on Ethiopia.
The agreement came as Ethio-
pian demonstrators, urged on by
government propagandists,
marched through towns and vil-
lages throughout the empire de-
manding war.
Both sides had hailed a peace
plea last weekend by United Na-
tions Secretary-General U Thant.
Somalia had announced Tuesday
it was ordering its own troops to
quit shooting. But the fighting
continued.
Claims Region
Somalia claims the arid Oga-
den Plateau region of eastern
Ethiopia on the ground that most
of its inhabitants - largely no-
madic herders of camels, sheep
and goats-are Somalis.
The Somalis are Moslems: the
Ethiopians are divided between
the Islamic and Christian re-
ligions.
fir

Soviet Party
Meets, Alters
Farm Plan
MOSCOW (P)-The Soviet Com-
munist Party's Central Committee
ended a marathon plenary meet-
ing yesterday by officially calling
a halt to Premier Nikita S. .hru-
shchev's 10-year effort to increase
farm production by expanding
farmlands.
A resolution, adopted at the
windup session of the six-day
meeting, said the time had come
to switch to modern intensive
farming methods.
Paying tribute to Khrushchev's
direction df farm policy, the reso-
lution said that "in the last 10
years, much has been done for the
advance of Soviet agriculture."h
'Important Contribution'
It called the Soviet leader's
scheme for plowing up millions of
acres of arid virgin lands of Ka-
zakhstan "an exceptionally im-
portant contribution to the, pro-
gress of all branches of agricul-
ture."
The document, published in the
Soviet government newspaper Iz-
vestia, called on agricultural work-
ers to double and treble farm out-
put in the next few years.
The Central Committee, the
party's top governing body, issued
a 19-point list of recommenda-
tions for improving lagging agri-
cultural methods.
Expose Shortcomings
Most of the points simply or-
dered local officials to correct
shortcomings exposed at the plen-
um by various speakers.
The resolution also ordered a
"get tough" drive to force agri-
cultural specialists out of the cities
and into farm areas.
It directed educational authori-
ties to take steps to transfer all
farm specialists schools and re-
search facilities to state farms
where students and professors
would be forced to engage in
practical work.
But, after Khrushchev's windup
speech Friday, Central Committee
members met only in executive
session with invited party workers
and propaganda experts.
The meeting was believed here
to have reviewed recent develop-
ments in the ideological war with
the Communist Chinese.

HOUSING ALSO:

Congress Starts Work
On College Student Aid
WASHINGTON -P-Congress begins work next week on two more
of President Lyndon B. Johnson's key 1964 legislative proposals-an
omnibus housing bill and a college student aid measure.
So far this year the legislators have devoted most of their time to
the two top-priority items on the admiinstration's list-civil rights
and a tax cut.
Some action is expected on these two in the week ahead. But both.
House and Senate will broaden out into new fields as the pace at the
capitol continues to be much fast- "

WASHINGTON () - This was
the week in which: Scranton also said that former
-Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-Vice-President Richard M. Nixon,
NY) and Sen. Barry Goldwater who too has chosen the draft-
(R-Ariz) both talked bravely of only attitude, is the best qualified
their progress toward the Repubof all. Scranton added this did
lican presidential nomination. be the best canditme.Nixonwould
-Gov. William W. Scranton (R- Johnson had high praise for
Penn) and Gov. George Romney. House passagedofgthe sweeping
urged eachothertgetinth new civil rights bill. Goldwater
and fight for the GOP nomination, said he hoped its public accom-
but neither did. 14

er than in last year's session.
The Senate education subcom-
mittee will start hearings Thurs-
day on a bill to provide scholar-
ships, an expanded loan program
and educational loan insurance
for college undergraduates.
This bill, sponsored by Sen.
Vance -artke (D-Ind) was offered
by administration lieutenants in,
the tax bill debate as an alterna-
tive to an amendement of Sen.
Abraham A. Ribicoff (D-Conn)
providing a tax saving on college
costs. Ribicoff's proposal was beat-
en by only 48-45.
However, the Senate previously
has voted for federal scholarships
only to see them rejected in the
House.,
Senate-House conferees on the
tax. cut bill resume their meet-
ings Monday, with final agree-
ment expected Tuesday or Wed-
nesday.
Robert C. Weaver, the housing
administrator, will open the case
for Johnson'srbig housing bill to-
morrow before a House subcom-
mittee. The counterpart Senate
group will begin its hearings Wed-
nesday.
The President, in submitting his
housing message Jan. 27, laid
stress on a new program of aid for
satellite - suburban communities
and assistance for low-income
families.
The bill also would continue and
expand present programs includ-
ing public housing and urban re-
newal. The measure already has
drawn fire from some legislators
as too broad and too expensive.
There is also a possibility a
farm bill containing cotton and
wheat programs may be brought
up before civil rights. The Senate
agriculture committee meets in
closed session Tuesday to try to
reach agreement on this measure.

Civil Right's
Group Splits
NEW YORK (M)-The committee
which sponsored the biggest civil,
rights demonstation in United
States history has fallen apart,
divided about whether a second
New York school boycott would
serve any useful purpose.
A union of civil rights organiza-
tions created the Citywide Com-
mittee for Integrated Schools with
the Rev. Milton A. Galamison as
its head and Bayard Rustin itsI
strategist.I
This weex, however, one organi-
zation withdrew from the com-
mittee, another said it was con-
tinuing on an "ex-officio" basis
and a third announced it was con-
sidering withdrawal.
The committee's Feb. 3 school
boycott to protest the segregation
which results from living patterns
emptied classrooms all over the
city.
Absentees totaled over 464,000
of the one million pupils enrolled
in the nation's largest public
school system. Normal daily ab-
sentees total about 100,000.
The participation far exceeded
the more than 200,000 persons in
the civil rights march on Wash-
ington last summer, which also
was planned by Rustin.
.But the board of education said
it intended to stick to its own plan
for eliminating de facto segrega-
tion by starting, on a limited scale
next fall, to bus pupils from one
neighborhood to another.
Civil rights leaders had de-.
nounced this as too little and too
late.

-Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff (D-
Conn) predicted that Johnson will
pick for his, running mate Atty.
Gen. Robert F. Kennedy, Peace
Corps Director Sargent Shriver, or
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D-
Minn).
Johnson started the rough talk
by declaring to a White House
gathering that this nation is re-
spected and appreciated around
;he world, "regardless of what some
of the bellyachers say."
GOP chairman William E. Mil-
ler was quick to react:
"We're bellyaching so much be-
cause we've got our bellies too
full.
And Goldwater declared:
"The bellyachers are people like
you and me who are getting sick
and tired of the United States be-
ing kicked around by every two-
bit dictator in the world."
Crucial Primary
Goldwater spoke optimistically
in California where there is to be
a crucial Republican preference
primary June 2.
"I intend to win big in Califor-
nia, win big in both the primary'
and in the general election in No-
vember," he said.
Rockefeller, who earlier had re-
ported himself pleased with the
situation in California, spoke this
week of his prospects.in the May
15 Oregon primary.
Real Optimism
"I know it's an uphill fight but
I have a feeling of real optimism,"
he said.
Scranton and Romney, who say
they Would run for President only
if drafted, met in Detroit. When
each failed to talk the other into
a more direct bid, the Pennsyl-
vania and Michigan chiefs dis-
cussed other candidates.
They agreed that Goldwater has
been slipping in their states in re-
cent weeks, but Scranton said
Goldwater still is ahead nationally
at the moment.

moaations section comad be modu--
fled to the point where it can be
enforced, or dropped altogether."
The bill is now up to the Senate
and politicians agree that what
happens there could sharply in-
fluence campaign trends, especi-
ally as they affect Johnson.

UNIVERSAL DAY OF PRAYER SERVICE
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Tappan at Hill Street
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16th
2:00 pm.Seminar-Facing Our World-International and
American students
6:00 p.m. Supper
7:00 p.m. Worship Service
Dr. Krister Stendahl of Harvard University, Speaker.
Sponsored by the Protestant Ecumenical Ministry
"$ 318.00. TO LONDON"I
U of M GROUP FLIGHT
Boston/London June 2
London/Boston August 5
Also Detroit Departure and Return $372.00
FOR ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND EMPLOYEES
Call Bob Spoley, NO 5-6885; Tom Steffe, NO 3-3845

Presidential Aspirants Push On

If Johnson's lieutenants force
through a strong bill, it would help
him with the liberals and Negroes,
and hurt him in the South; If the
Senate modifies the program much
and Johnson goes along, Just the
reverse might be the case.
Quiet Campaign.
The campaigning for the March
10 New Hampshire primary drag-
ged on, with Goldwater and Sen.
Margaret Chase Smith (R-Maine)
particularly active.
While far-ranging, Mrs. Smith's
travels were exceptionally quiet
for a presidential candidate-no
advance arrangements, no big
build-ups, just she and her two
aides driving from town to town.

If

world News
Roundup

FINAL SALE

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
State Dean Rusk said yesterday
some American consumers may
decide to boycott goods of British
firms selling to Cuba although the
United States government plans to
foster no such retaliation.

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