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February 07, 1964 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-07

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 71934

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. FEBRUARY ~. l~L~&

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Ja ica0 Jam s'Gee
EASTER VACATION IN JAMAICA
at a Very Low SPECIAL RATE
8 Days of SUN and FUN
Leaving via JET plane from Detroit . . March 21
Returning .. March 29
I* *
Price Includes:
ROUND TRIP AIR FARE VIA JET
o Deluxe Hotel accommodations, at fabulousI
RUNAWAY BAY HOTEL, directly on the
Blue Caribbean
*Every room air-conditioned ...
Every room with private balcony
* Largest Olympic Pool in the Caribbean
0 Half-mile of gorgeous white sand Beach
" Full course Tropical breakfasts . .
Gourmet Dinners
Unlimited Golf on 18-hole Championship Course I
Picnic at famous Dunn's River Fallsh
Nightly Dancing to Calypso Rhythems
Lot of Caribbean FUN and NONSense
80 mile scenic coastal drive
Steak Fry on the Beach
Pool and Beach Parties{
Native Floor Shows
Limbo LessonsI
Imagine... at the Height of the Season
. All This For
$329.00
Total Price from Detroit
Phone: TRAVEL CENTRE . . . 663-8558
for immediate reservations1
orI
Fill out coupon and return to TRAVEL CENTRE,
1207 Packard, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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jI(we) want to join the JAMAICA JAMBOREE
Send detailed itinerary to:I
Name
Addresc
Phone__
There will be people in my party.
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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The Daily Official Bulletin is
an official publication of the Uni-
versity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility; Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
cedingf publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7

Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-Arnold Wesker's "The
Kitchen," plus short, "Good Night, Soc-
rates" (Golden Lion Award, Venice):
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
School of Music Festival of Contem-
porary Music-Univ. Symphony Orches-
tra, Josef Blatt, conductor, Ronald
Pepper, violinist; instrumental-choral
ensemble, David Sutherland, conduc-
t*r. Susan Morris, soprano, Franklin
Dybdahl, baritone: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Astronomical Colloquium: 4 p.m., Rm.
807, Physics-Astronomy Bldg. Prof. Fred
T. Haddock, Radio Astronomy Observa-
tory, will speak on "Gravitational
Collapse and Relativistic Astrophysics:
the Dallas Symposium."
For Other University Events today,
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
College of Lit., Science and Arts, and
Schools of Business Admin., Education,
Music, Natural Resources, Nursing end
Public Health: Students who received
marks of 1, X, or No Report at the end
of their last semester or summer ses-
sion of attendance will receive a grade
of "E" in the course or courses unless
this work is made up. The final date
of acceptance for make-up grades this
semester is Feb. 13, 1964. Students
wishing an extension of time beyond
this date should file a petition with
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations who are planning to be
active-for'the Spring Semester should
be registered by Feb. 7, 1964. Forms
available, 1011 Student Activities Bldg.
! * *
Alpha Omega Fellowship, Weekly
meeting, Sun., Feb. 9, 10 a.m., Grace
Bible Church, 110 N. Main St. Now
studying Isaiah.
* *a *
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Fri. noon luncheon
discussion, "Racial Injustice - Right
Here!" Mrs. Talayco, Feb. 7, 12-1 p.m.,
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, lec-
ture by Dr. Eugene Williams: "Digging
the Past for the Present," Feb. 7, 7:30
p.m., Union (3rd floor conf. room).
Unitarian Student Group, Talk and
discussion, "America's Sex Ethics," Feb.
9, 7:30 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw.

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the appropriate official of their re-
spective schools.
In the School of Nursing, the above!
information refers to non-Nursing
courses only.
Martha Cook Bldg. applications for
residence are due no later than Mon.,
Feb. 17. First appointments will be
made through Fri., Feb. 14.
French and German Screening Exams:
The screening exams in French and
German for Doctoral candidates will be
administered on Thurs., Feb. 13, from 7-
9 p.m. in Aud, C. Angell Hall. Doctoral
candidates must pass the screening
exam before taking the written test
in French orBGerman unless they
have received B or better in French
111 or German 11.rAny candidaterwho
fails to pass the exam cannot attempt
it again until April.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting of
February 6, 1964
Accepted: Resignation of Elaine Res-
mer from Couxci to be effective March
6, 1964.
Adopted: That SGC hold the Council
meeting of Feb. 19, 1964, at South Quad-
rangle.
Adopted: That the terms of the mem-
bers of all SGC committees and related
boards except the Committee on Stu-
dent Concernsnwhich are due to ex-
pire this month be extended until
after spring interviewing.
Adopted: That Tony Chiu, Steve Do-
man, and Judy Mrk be appointed to
the Committee on Student Concerns
for terms ending at the time of spring
interviewing.
Adopted: That SGC appoint Nancy
Freitag to the University Committee
on Student Counseling Services.
Adopted: That appointments to all
SGC committees and related boards!
except the Membership Committee shall
be made in the spring (after spring
vacation and two weeks prior to the
end of classes) for terms of one year
Adopted: To appoint two SGC inter-
viewing committees for terms of one
semester one week following SGC offi-
cer elections:
a.) The executive committee plus one
ex-officio plus one elected member
to interview for ad hoc committees
(where necessary), for the Committee
on Membership, and for Council vacan-
cies (where necessary).
b.) The administrative vice-president
plus three Council members to inter-
view for all other SGC committees and
related boards; the Chairman of the
committee under consideration, two
members of the Student Relations Con-
mittee of the Senate and the president
and vice-president of Graduate Student
Council shall be invited to attend the
interviews for the Committee on Uni-
versity Affairs.
Adopted: That Fred Rhines and Scott
Crooks be mandated to represent SGC
for the purposes of organizing the
publication of a Course Description
Booklet; to report periodically to SGC as
to the status of such a publication and
to bring to SGC any motions to facili-
tate publication.-
Received: Report from Committee on
Student Concerns regarding SGC sup-
port of delegates to off-campus con-
ferences and the considerations in-
volved.
Postponed: Consideration of year-
round operations.
Adopted: SGC recognizes the responsi-
bility of Assembly and Inter-Quadrangle
Council to work on the questions rais-
ed concerning laundry service in the
Residence Hals and offers their sup-
port to the efforts of these two bodies.
SGC recommends that serious con-
sideration be given to a policy of an-
nual open bidding with the selection
of a specified number of laundries by
a committee including student repre-
sentation. The criteria for such selec-
tion should be those of price, service
and quality.
Approved: Revised Panhellenic Asso-
ciation constitution.
Adopted: That the Michigan Union be
appointed as Co-USNSA Travel Direc-
tor along with the present campus
travel director with the stipulation
that the rates charged for tours be the
same as those charged for tours ar-
ranged through the SGC Travel Direc-
tor.
Events
The following student sponsored
events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social Chairmen are reminded
that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than 12 o'clock noon
on the Tues. prior to the event.
FEB. 7-
Phi Kappa Psi, Informal Party; Scott
and Mosher, Mixer; Thronson Hose,
Open House; VanTyne House-Markley,
Open Open and dance; Zeta Psi, Friday
Night Soiree.
FEB. 8-
Alpha Delta Phi, Band Party; Alpha
Tau Omega, Dance; Anderson House,
Security is
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Open-Dance; Beta Theta Pi, Band Par-
ty; Chi Psi, Band-Dance; Delta Kappa
Epsilon, Band Party; Delta Upsilon,
Band Party; Fletcher Hall, Mixer; Kap-
pa Sigma, House Party; Phi Epsilon
Pi, Party; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Band
Party; Phi Gamma Delta, Beattle Party.
Pi Lambda Phi, Band Party; Phi Sig-
ma Delta, Band Party; Psi Upsilon,
Party; Sigma Alpha Mu, House Party;
Strauss- House, Open Open; Taylor,
Pizza Party; Theta Chi, Skating Par-
ty; Triangle, Rush Party; Trigon, In-
vitation Dance; Williams, Open Open;
Delta Chi, Band Party; Phi Sigma
Kappa. Ft. Lauderdale Party; Zeta Psi,
Band Party.
FEB. 9-.
Lloyd House, Open Open; Greene
House, Open Open; Phi Kappa Psi,
Informal Party.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
The Next FSEE Exam will be given
on March 21. You must apply for this
exam by Feb.20.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago, 111.-)
Clerk-Typist & Writing Ass't. Woman.
Bookkeepipg knowledge desirable. Must
be good typist. Must have some trg.
and/or working exper. in writing. 2)
Secretary to General Mgr.-Exper. re-
quired.
Alco Products, Inc., Schenectady, N.Y.
-Various openings include: Engineers
(Application, Calcufation, Indust., Mech.
& Service), also Market Analyst-de-
gree with thorough knowledge of tech.
survey techniques & several yrs. ex-
per, in mkt. res.
City of Lansing, Mich.-Forestry Tech-
nician IIIB-degree in Forestry, Horti-
culture or related field. Would be ad-
visable for a Lansing graduate to apply
for this position. Also position as
Parks Naturalist IVA-degree In the
Eology field, with a knowledge of Bot-
any, Zoo., Geol. & Soils.
Management Consultants in Chicago
-Client firm seeks Staff Electrican En-
gineer. BSEE or BSME, pref. the former.
5-10 yrs. in design and/or application
of power machinery & controls, D.C.
& A.C.
* * *
For further information, please con-
tact General Div., Bureau of Apopint-
ments, 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Camp O'The Hills, Mich.-Will inter-
view for Waterfront Dir., Unit leader
(both must be 21), Ass't. Waterfront (20
yrs.), & a foreign student with skills
for Girl Scout camp. Feb., 11, Tues.
Camp Batawagama, Mich.-Will in-
terview for Cabin counselor, Arts &
crafts and Waterfront positions for co-
ed camp. Wed., Feb. 12, beginning at
10 a.m. (also known as Iron County
Youth Camp).
Camps Fairwood & Foreway, Mich. -
Will interview for boys & girls camps.
Positions open-Men-activities, water-
front, archery, canoeing, sailing & ten-
nis. Women: sailing, archery, dramatics
& Jr. camp. Wed., Feb. 12
Camp BirchTrails, Wis.-Will inter-
view for positions in girls camp. Open-
ings forpa married couple, tennis &
crafts specialists. Thurs. & Fri., Feb.
13 & 14.
The Brass Rail, World's Fair Conces-
sionaire-We have applications at 212
SAB-Summer Placement.
American Student Information Serv-
ice, Luxembourg - Only organization
that guarantees you a job in Europe.
Applications at Summer Placement.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule at 128-H W.
Engrg. for appointments with the fol-
FEB. 10-
Chain Belt Co., Milwaukee, Wis. &
various other divs.-BS-MS: CE, ME &
Met. MS: Construction, Sanitary: BS:
IE. Grad. Student Training Prog.
FEB. 10 & 11-
Ford Motor Co., All Co. Components
& locations countrywide-All Degrees:
ChE, EE, Instrumentation, ME & Met.
Prof.: Applied Mech's. BS: CE, E
Math, E Physics & Sci. Engrg. BS-MS:
EM, IE, Mat's. May & Aug. grads. R. &
D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
FEB. 10-
Gulf Research & Dev. Co., Suburban
Pittsburgh, Pa.-All Degrees: ChE, EE,
Physics & Math. MS-PhD: ME & Geol.
MS: Met. May & Aug. grads. R. & D.
Kimberly-Clark Corp., General Offices
& all mills-All Degrees: ChE. MS-PhD:
Instrumentation. BS-MS: ME. BS: BE.
May & Aug. grads. R. & D., Des. & Prod.
FEB. 10-11-
Shell Companies, Throughout U.S.-
BS-MS: ChE, CE, EE, EM, ME & Met.
MS: Construction. U.S. & Canadian
citizens for positions with Shell of
Canada (BS-MS-ChE, ME, EE, Mining
& Geol. Engrg.). Read brochure, "Op-
portunities with Shell of Canada." R.
& D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
Space Tech. Labs., Redondo Beach,
Calif.-MS-PhD: AE & Astro., EE, EM,
Instru., Mat's. & ME. Prof.: Applied
Mech's. May & Aug. grads. R, & D., Des.
FEB. 10-
U.S. Steel Corp., Throughout U.S. -
BS: ChE, CE, EE, E Math, EM, IE, ME,
Met, & Sci. Engrg. May & Aug. grads.
U.S. & (Venezuelan citizens-for Ori-
noco Mining Div. in Venezuela). Des.,
Prod. Steel fabricating & erecting with
Am. Bridge Div.

4
VERDI
QJTtOPEZZI SACRUZ
CARLO MARIA IULI!, I

See Changes
In Direction
Of Civil Rights
(Continued from Page 3)
Smith, executive secretary for the
NAACP branch there said. In
Birmingham, officials of the Ala-
bama Christian Movement, headed
by the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth,
also met yesterday to plan new
demonstrations in that city. It's.
only a matter of deciding when
to start demonstrating. "Civil
rights will get warm before the
weather," he insisted.
Next Saturday, NAACP repre-
sentatives from across Virginia
will meet in Richmond to draft
civil rights moves for that state.
1CORE has called its members to
New Orleans a week from tomor-
row to plan new drives over the
South. At Tulsa, "stand-ins" are
schedule dto begin in the mayors
office Feb. 15 unless city fathers
have acted favorably by then on
complaints against segregated
commercial facilities.
Demonstrations are already un-
der way in Chapel Hill, N. C., a
city noted for its efforts to ease
tension, and are to be stepped up
this week following the passing
last Saturday of a "deadline" for
all restaurants and hotels to open
to Negroes.
In Atlanta, conservative Negro
leaders are joining demonstrations
begun by the more impatient
youngsters of the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee
(SNICK). Harry Boyte, special as-
sistant to the Rev. Martin Luther
King of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, comment-
ed, "Atlanta faces a really mas-
sive direct action movement that
will be developing over the next
two or three weeks."
While Mr. Boyte and other
spokesmen for civil rights groups
insist that this year's demonstra-
tions will dwarf those of last year,
one big difference can already be
detected.
Though the 1963 tactics of send-
ing waves of marchers through
downtown streets won't be entirely
abandoned, the emphasis now is
on selected targets such as a hold-
out restaurant-Leb's in Atlanta,
for example-or a department
store which has reneged on prom-
ises to hire Negro clerks. Negroes
already are picketing four New
Orleans stores for this reason.
A prime factor in the shift of
strategy, confides Gloster B. Cur-
rent, NAACP director of branches,
New York, is that the marching
tactics didn't always pay off. "In
Jackson," he said "our marches
were smothered. We found that
the opposition had developed some
counter measures of their own."

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COMPOSERS CONDUCTING THEIR OWN WORKS
Copland THIRD SYMPHONY Aaron Copland conducting
Copland BILLY THE KID Aaron Copland conducting
Villa-Lobos FANTASIA CONCERTANTE Hector Villa-Loboc
conducting
Benjamin 2 CONCERTI FOR PIANO & ORCH. Arthur Benjamin
conducting
Arnold FOUR SCOTTISH DANCES & SYM. NO. 3 Malcolm Arnold
conducting
Chavez SYMPHONIES NO. 1, 2, & 4 Carlos Chavez conducting
Grofe GRAND CANYON SUITE /Ferde Grofe conducting
Grofe PIANO CTO. (WORLD PREMIERE RECORDING)
Ferde Grofe conducting
Dohnanyi RECORDED AND PLAYED BY ERNST YON DOHNANYI
Jan. 1960
Hindemith REQUIEM FOR THOSE WE LOVE Paul Hindemith
conducting
Bartok CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA Stokowski/Houston Sym.
The Beethoven Symphonies conducted by Joseph Krips/London Sym.:
SYMPHONIES NO. 1 & 8
SYMPHONIES NO. 2 & 4
SYMPHONY NO. 3
SYMPHONY NO. 5 & EGMONT OVERTURE
SMPHONY NO. 6
SYMPHONY NO. 7
SYMPHONY NO. 9
Brahms THIRD SYMPHONY Stokowski/Houston Sym.
Berlioz SYMPHONY FANTASTIQUE Sir Eugene Goossens/
London Sym.
Tchaikovsky SYMPHONY NO. 5 Sir Malcolm Sargent/London Sym.
Schubert SYMPHONY NO. 8 Ludwig/London Sym.
Mozart SYMPHONY NO. 40 Ludwig/London Sym.
Strauss EIN HELDENLEBEN Ludwig/London Sym.
Stravinsky RITE OF SPRING Goossens/London Sym.
Moussorgsky PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION Sargent/London Sym.
Mozart SERENADES FOR WIND INSTRUMENTS Newell Jenkins
Shostakovitch SYMPHONY NO. 9 Sargent/London Sym.
Prokofiev LIEUTENANT KIJE SUITE Sargent/London Sym.
Prokofiev SYMPHONY NO. 5 Sargent/London Sym.
Schumann PIANO CONCERTO Katin/Goossens/London Sym.
Frank SYMPHONIC VARIATIONS Katin/Goossens/London Sym.
Stravinsky PETROUCHKA (complete original version) Goossens/
London Sym.
Vaughan Williams JOB: A MASQUE FOR DANCING Sir Adrian
Boult/London Phil.
Mahler SYMPHONY NO. 5 Schwartz/London Sym.
Milhaud LA CREATION DU MONDE Carewe/London Sym.
Stravinsky L'HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT Carewe/London Sym.
Villa-Lobos UIRAPURU Stokowski/Stadium Sym. of New York
Prokofiev CINDERELLA Stokowski/Stadium Sym. of New York
Stravinsky SYMPHONY IN THREE MOVEMENTS Goossens/
London Sym.
Hinemith SYMPHONY IN EFLAT Sir Adrian Boult/London Phil.
Vaughan Williams SYMPHONY NO. 9 Boult/London Phil.
Shostakovitch SYMPHONY NO. 6 Boult/London Phil.
Mahler SYMPHONY NO. 1 Boilt/London Phil.
Prokofiev CHOUT BALLET Walter Susskind/London Sym.
Scriabiin THE POEM OF ECTASY Stokowski/Houston Sym.
Wagner PARSIFAL SELECTIONS Stokowski/Houston Sym.
Antill CORROBOREE Goossens/London Sym.
Respighi FESTE ROMANE Goossens/London Sym.
Rachmaninoff SYMPHONIC DANCES Goossens/London Sym.
Kodaly PSALMUS HUNGARICUS Ferencsik/London Phil.
Choir and Orch.
Shostakovitch SYMPHONY NO. 5 Stokowski/Stadium Sym.
Tchaikovsky HAMLET & FRANCESCA do RIMINI Stokowski/
Stadium Syrp.
Antheil SYMPHONY NO. 4 Goossens/London Sym.
Strauss TILL EULENSPIEGEL, DON JUAN, SALOME Stokowski/
Stadium Orch.

4

4

ERE ST

THE
KINGSTON TRIO
presents
THINK

(S)T-2011

In this album the nation's lead-
ing folk group presents a collec-
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It Includes the Trio's new hit
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This is an album that every
Trio fan must have. You'll want
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Rimsky-Korsakov SCHEHERAZADE Goossens/London Sym.
Tchaikovsky MANFRED Goossens/London Sym.
Hindemith VIOLIN CTO. (WORLD PREMIERE RECORDING)
Fuchs/Goossens/London Sym..
Mozart VIOLIN CTO. NO. 3 Fuchs/Goossens/London Sym.
Villa-Lobos LITTLE TRAIN OF THE CAIPIRA Goossens/
London Sym.
Prokofiev PETER AND THE WOLF Keeshan/Stokowski
Sibelius VIOLIN CTO. Spivakovsky/Hannikainen/London Symh.
Tchaikovsky VIOLIN CTO. Spivakovsky/Goehr/London Sym.
Mahler SYMPHONY NO. 9 Ludwig/London Sym.
Respighi FOUNTAINS & PINES OF ROME Sargent/London Sym.
Khachaturian GAYNE-BALLET SUITE Fistoulari/London Sym.
Khachaturian PIANO CTO. Katin/Rignold/London Sym.
Dvorak NEW WORLD SYMPHONY Ludwig/London Sym.
DeFalla THREE-CORNERED HAT (complete) Jorda/London Sym.
Irving Berlin GERSHWIN-A NEW INTERPRETATION Poliakin
Lili Boulanger WORLD PREMIERE RECORDING OF HER WORKS
Igor Markevitch/Lamoureux Orch.
Ravel LA VALSE, RHAPSODIE ESPAGNOLE Bloomfield/
Rochester Phil.
Liszt PIANO RECITAL Jorge Bolet
Brahms SYMPHONY NO. 4 Steinberg/Pittsburgh Sym.
Gershwin RHAPSODY IN BLUE Sanroma/Steinberg/Pittsburgh Sym.
Sibelius SYMPHONY NO. 5 Bloomfield/Rochester Phil.
Gershwin AMERICAN IN PARIS Sanroma/Steinberg/
Pittsburgh Sym.
Wagner, Chopin, Thomas Channing SELECTIONS BY STOKOWSKI
Weber, Chopin, Schubert and others, played by Bohnke, new pianist
Poulenc PIANO AND WOODWIND SEXTET New York
Woodwind Quintet
Schubert OCTET FOR STRINGS AND WINDS Fine Arts Quartet
and New York Woodwind Quintet
Francaix and Taffanel QUINTETS FOR WINDS New York
Woodwind Quintet
Richa, Barrows, Pierne, Wilder, Milhaud, others SELECTIONS BY
New York Woodwind Quintet
Brahms SYMPHONY NO. 1 Hollreiser/Hamburg Sym.
Tchaikovsky SERENDADE FOR STRINGS & 1812 OVERTURE
Hagen/Bavarian Sym.
Dvorak and Smetana SLAVONIC DANCES Hagen/Austrian Sym.
Deutschmeister MILITARY MARCHES Hermann/
Deutschmeister Band
Goossens MEMORIAL ALBUM Goossens/London Sym.
Prokofiev CINDERELLA & UGLY DUCKLING SUITES Regina
Resnik/Stokowski
P-1 - ^rnnntii -1-nvcRMHOVEN PIA~NCONATAS NO. 30 & 31

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