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May 27, 1969 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1969-05-27

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 27, 1969

rage Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, May 27, 1969

The Texas Wedge
Flashbac .. .
...;November 5, 1968
By DREW BOGEMA
November 5th was the day I voted for Hubert Humphrey.
It was also the day I voted for the continued existence of
Detroit, Lawrence Welk, the Ann Arbor News, and WJBK-TV in
"Lunch-Box City" as opposed to barricades, street violence, a
radical transformation of the existing order, and the institution
of a new and exciting brand of politics.
My friends expect me to apologize whenever mention is
made of my decision last November. Many of my friends con-
sider themselves radicals, which by all means they should. They
should continue to oppose mass murder in Vietnam, the cen-.
tralization of power in the United States, the existing customs
and conventions of a sterile social existence, and the proliferation
of irrelevance by capitalistic agents.
However, all I have to say about November 5th is this:
One should never vote on an empty stomach.
I was walking down Wells Street toward Burns Park School
when sharp and intense hunger pains began striking the walls of
my stomach. I quickly recalled that it had been close to seven-
teen hours since I had last stuffed food into my body politic.
AT THE TIME I was wavering between voting for Cleaver
in a mood of hostile, righteous, indignation, or, voting for
Humphrey, humbly announcing that the Republic was one-
hundred-and-ninety-two years old .and two hundred million
strong, and who was I to cast judgment?
The startling lack of fuel added a disruptive element to my
calculations, and prevented a sound and intelligent approach to
the problem. To my mind, political scientists and those con-
gerned with the nature of the political animal have devoted
entirely too much attention to the long-range factors that play
an influence upon how a person votes. The culinary aspects of
my own political ethic were strongly pushing me in a direction
I had vowed not to go.
AS I MOVED past the campaign workers stationed outside
the school, the choice seemed definitely to be Cleaver. Although
for the last week, I had oriented my mind toward the plea set
forth by . the desperate Democrats, that the absolute priority
was to prevent Nixon from gaining power, the pains were too
great; dissension within my intestinal tract was pushing me to-
ward radicalism in politics. Or perhaps it was merely the gleam
in the eye of the middle-aged Harvey volunteer, not the digestive
aspects, that propelled me to Peace and Freedom.
Forget the violent aspects of Cleaer and the Panthers, my
stomach told me. Evil politicians like Humphrey who ignore tear
gas and Mace for acceptance speeches, who can embrace the
corpse of Lyndon Johnson placing their reservations upon the
shrine of liberalism, who can't respond to massive public de-
mands for revision of policy, who can't change their convictions
in the middle of the stream, ain't fit to be politicos or Presidents.
This mood of hostility was only reinforced as I entered
the school. A long table replete with the diverse varieties of Girl
Scout cookies and other refreshments had been positioned near
the door.
Be firm, came the directions from my ramshackle mental
control center. Don't be pushed into voting for Humphrey simply
because the pols have waylaid your path with alluring delights
to sway you into mainstream channels. It was reminiscient of
the Nixon line that implored angry students to come back into
the American middle. "Hell no, I won't go," I brusquely chanted
(to a surprised matron) and moved to the end of the corridor
where thirty or so clustered, anxiously waiting to cast their
ballots.
THE THIRTY or so were connected to another seventy who
waited patiently inside the gymnasium. The great majority, my
stomach told me, seemed to be elderly or professional middle-
class thralls who had taken the day off to engage in the great
American game. And they were excited too, for toes tapped,
shoulders rustled, and pairs of eyes rapidly swung around the
gym.
Immediately ahead of me in line was a boy clad in a red-
plaid corduroy jacket and as we watched our slow movement
toward the tables inside, a conversation was struck. After
both of us tossed out pieces of rhetoric conerning the utility
of the American political system, I asked him of his intentions.
"For Humphrey . . . anything to keep that bastard from
'power," he replied.
The strength of the Cleaver mood, however, was slipping as
I lit up a cigarette, which served to temporarily suppress my
appetite. The Nixon-Agnew ticket would spell doom to any
chance of an early conclusion of hostilities in Vietnam. Racial

separation and inequality would be furthered, not retarded.
Faced with growing threats to domestic tranquility by the mili-
tancy of the ghetto and the campus, Richard Nixon would adopt
aspects, if not -the entire barrel, of the Wallace program.
A VOTE for Humphrey would put a man into office with the
toleration and restraint to stem the flow of reactionary move-
ment within America, and re-direct youthful energy toward
meaningful reform, a change of sterile life-styles, and an end to
the dehumanization of modern, industrial life.
A vote for Cleaver would be valuable in insuring that Peace
and Freedom would meet the 13,000-vote requirement. However,
it would be much more meaningful if Milhouse and Spiro T.
were kept away from the levers of power.
Cleaver was as ass, I told myself. The authoritarian aspects
of his personality and program gave him a Stalin-like appear-
ance. Why hadn't the Gregory caucus at the Peace and Free-
dom convention won out, so that the choice between violence and
stultification could be deferred?
I lit another Winston (products of scab labor, I was told)
and my appetite again was suppressed. After all, wasn't Hum-
phrey the man who had told the Dixiecrats to go to hell in 1948?
Wasn't this the man whom I prayed for to win in West Virgina
and Wisconsin in 1960?
The old Humphrey and the new Humphrey were one and the
same. He had been forced to coalesce with the decisions of the
Johnson Administration because of his deep and underlying
faith in the American ethic. (Voice from below: "Wasn't this the
man who conspired with Boss Daley to put an end to popular
participation at Chicago?)
MY REFLECTIONS were once again diverted by a League
of Women Voter type who steered me into the voting machine.
Here I was at the brink of decision. Passively, I allowed my mind
to reflect the strongest mental force, and, consequently lit an-
other cigarette. The decision had been made. Stomach said no
more. I quickly pulled the lever for Humphrey and the legion
of local radicals and walked dejectedly out of the building.
I had sold out. I had voted for compromise, accommodation,

2M' nine takes

two from Iowa;

1.010000=%
M-4

ERE

Finishes campaign tied for fifth
By JOHN GLAUSER the sacks, and Jim Hosler then le by John Arvai were the b i g
It was a case of too little too' came through with a timely sin- blows of the inning. Steve For-
late f o r Coach Moby Benedict's gle to right center, scoring two. sythe. winning pitcher Tom Fles-
Wolverine diamond squad as the Tom Lundstedt drove in what zar, Rich Orr, and Jim Hosler con-
diamondmen gained some salva- proved to be the winning run with tributed base hits to keep the ral-
tion out of one of the worst Mich- another single, and Michigan led, ly going. The hot Michigan bat-
igan baseball campaigns in recent 3-2. ters knocked out two Iowa pitch-
history by sweeping a doublehead- The Wolverines threatened only ers in the frame
er from Iowa, 3-2 and 8-7, Satur- once more, when they loaded the The win raised Fleszar's record
day afternoon at Ferry Field. ' bases with nobody out in the to 4-1, a nd boosted Michigan's
The wins enabled the Wolver- fourth frame. Mike Bowen dou- conference record to the .500
ines to capture a fifth place tie in bled, Mike Rafferty walked, and mark. Minnesota ran away with
the Big Ten with an 8-8 mark.winning pitcher Mark Carrow beat the title with a 15-3 mark, while!
Michigan's overall record was a out an infield hit, but they were Illinois was a distant second with
weak 14-22. all stranded when Orr and For-a- 7
In the first game of the I o w a sythe struck out and Redmon an 11-7 record.
doubleheader, Michigan got all of skied to center. It is difficult to assess the Wol-
its runs in the first inning to get Carrow had little trouble with verine's chances for next season,
the Hawkeyes after t h e opening Many of their b e s t hitters are
frame, allowing only six hits in graduating, including Glenn Red-
F ' the game, and making his slim 3-2 mon John Kraft, Rich Orr, John
lead hold up for the entire game. Arvai, Jim Hosler, Steve For-

sports
NIGHT EDITOR'
PHIL HERTZ
a lead which was to hold for the
rest of the contest. Trailing 2-0,
Rich Orr led off with a triple to
deep center. Steve Forsythe reach-
ed base on an error by Iowa short-
stop Dave Kroll, Orr holding up.
Glenn Redmon was walked, filling

The Michigan righthander struck
out four and walked three in the
seven inning contest, and retired!
the last nine Iowa batters in order.
Michigan had to come from far
behind to pull out the s e c o n d
game. Iowa scored single runs in
the first two frames, and added
three more in the top of the fifth,
giving them a 5-0 lead. The Wol-
verines, however, came back in
their half of the fifth with seven
runs to take a lead which they
never relinguished.
Glenn Redmon's home run, good
I for two runs, and a two-run trip-

sythe, and Chuck Schmidt.
One bright spot is that the en-
tire Michigan pitching staff will
return for next year. The fact that
freshmen will be eligible for the
team might have some effect on
the performance of the team, so
any prediction for next year would
be extremely tenuous.
As f o r this year's team, John
Arvai was the team's batting lead-
er, with Glenn Redmon a close
second. Mark Carrow led the Wol-
verines in earned run average,
while Tom Fleszar had the best
won-lost percentage,

Continued from Page 3)
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Packard Plaza, 917 Packard
University Plaza, 608 Monroe
Bel-Air, 815 S. Main
Oak Terrace, 908 Oakland
Athena, 508 S. Division

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Sports staffer enters nupiis nervously
Kieth R. "Woody" Wood wed the former Jan Heyl in a ceremony held in Grand Rapids Saturday.
Wood, the poker playing, wine drinking, Daily janitor and sometime sports writer, was nervous
throughout but managed his share of the service with flawless precision and a wide grin. The happy
couple will leave Ann Arbor this Saturday for a three week honeymoon in Britain.

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THIRTEEN GAMES:
ABC to carry Monday g

NEW YORK () - Professional
football and the American Broad-
casting Co. reached an agreement
yesterday for the televising in
color of 13 regular season games
on Monday night starting in 1970.
The agreement is for three
years. Announcement was made
by Roone Arledge, president of
ABC Sports, and Pete Rozelle, pro
football commissioner.
The amount of money involved
in the agreement was not an-
nounced.
This is the first contract with
a professional sports league for a
regular series during prime televi-
sion time. The telecasts of the
Monday games will start at 8:30
or 9 p.m., EDT.
The weekly series will start on
the first Monday night of the
regular season in 1970 and end on
the Monday night before the last
weekend of the regular season.
Rozelle emphasized that the
contract covers only 13 regular
season games annually. Contracts
covering the remaining 169 regu-
lar season games of the 26 pro
teams in the newly realigned
league will be negotiated later,
Rozelle said.
The commissioner added that

income from all television will be
shared equally by the 26 teams.
It was speculated that Rozelle
would announce the complete tele-
vision-money package after he
meets with NBC and CBS officials
to negotiate the remaining Sunday
package. Current contracts with
the two networks expire after the
1969 season.
CBS now covers the National
Football League, and NBC tele-
casts the American League games.

rrid contests
It is estimated that the NFL
will receive $20 million for the
television rights from CBS in
1969 in addition to another $2 mi-
lion for the championship game.
CBS will also show the Super
Bowl this year under an alter-
nating policy with NBC for which
the NFL will receive an additional
$2.5 million-
The AFL is in the last year of a
year-year $38 million package
with NBC, which includes the
championship game.

WELCOME
STUDENTS!
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I

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Phone 426-4030

Broken hand hinders Benvenuti
as Tiger captures non-title bout

NEW YORK (IP)-Nino Benve-
nuti's venture into the light
heavyweight division ended in dis-
aster last night when he suffered
a broken right hand and lost a
unanimous decision to Dick Tiger
in a 10 round nonetitle bout at
Madison Square Garden.
The world middleweight 'cham-
pion said he hurt his hand with a
high punch to the head in the
first round. "It was a terrible
pain," he said. "From then on I

MAJOR LEAGUE STANDINGS
...E.... .. .. .. . . . ..

was practically a one-handed
fighter."
Dr. Edwin Campbell of the New
York State Athletic Commission
said Nino suffered a complete
break of the metacarpal bone be-
hind the right index finger and
would not be able to train for at
least eight weeks.
Benvenuti went to the Poly-
clinic Hospital after appearing at
a news conference, displaying his
swollen hand.
Tiger, a 39-year-old happy guy
from Biafra, fought with the des-
peration of man groping for a last
chance. The victory reinstated
Tiger as a leading contender for
the light heavy crown he lost last
year to Bob Foster.
Tiger cut Benvenuti around the
left eye in a close quarters in the
seventh round and referee Tony
Perez cautioned them as they
broke. In the last round Tiger was
warned to keep his punches up.
Referee Perez scored it 7-2-1,
Judge Joe Armstrong 6-4 and
Judge Al Berl 6-3-1, all for Tiger.
The Associated Press card was 7-3
for Tiger who went into the ring
a 12-5 underdog.

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1~
-z

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W ' L Pct. G
Baltimore 32 13 .711
Boston 26 14 .650'
Detroit 21 17 .553
New York 20 24 .455 1
Washington 20 26 .435 1
Cleveland 10 26 .278
West Division
Minnesota 24 16 .600 -
Oakland 21 17 .553
Kansas City 20 21 .488
Chicago 17 18 .486
Seattle 19 21 .475
California 11 28 .282 1
Yesterday's Results
Minnesota 7, Washington I
Only game scheduled

B
7?h
11%
121,
171-.
2
41'
4t7
1 z
5
12

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Houston
San Diego

23
23
20
21
17

17
19
19
24
29

.575
.548
.513
.467
.374

4
5
6%>
13

Yesterday's Results
Atlanta 3, St. Louis 0
Only game scheduled
Today's Games
San Diego at New York, night
Los Angeles at Montreal, night
St. Louis at Atlanta, night
Philadelphia at Houston, night
Chicago at San Francisco, night
Only games scheduled

I_____I__________-_---

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