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May 24, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-05-24

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LAST CHANCE TONIGHT
COME EARLY!!
MICHAEL
COONEY
"IF PETE SEEGER retired tomorrow,
with Michael around there would be
no gap."-BROADS IDE
"Two young men proved to be both
natural show-stoppers and performers
of rare skill. Bob Dylan and Michael
Cooney." - SAN FRANCISCO EX-
AMINER

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
361-1451

second froit page

T4C

5f47Mtuzgt

NE11 S PHONE: 764.055
BSJNS ESS. PHOUNE: 764-0534

Saturday, May 24, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

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By PAT MAHONEY
During the next twelve months, 123
University students and four profes-
sors will study foreign languages and
cultures under fellowships in excess of
$500,000 funded by the U.S. Office
of Education.
The fellowship were granted mainly
to encourage the study of less-known
languages. The University was also
awarded fellowships for students to
work on dissertations abroad.
The University received 108 of 2;342
National Defense Foreign Language
Fellowship (NDFL) awarded. Eighty-
six are for the academic year 1969-1970
and 22 are for this summer.
Of the 86 regular awards, thirty-one
are for study of East Asian languages,
fifteen for South and Southeast Asian
languages, twenty-four for Middle
East languages and sixteen for Slavic
languages. During the 1969-1970 aca-
demic year, each NDFL student will
receive about $4,500.
Summer fellowships are granted to
undergraduate and graduate students

1

4TH
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0
Cvs 127
for intensive study of non-Western
languages. For this summer, the Uni-
versity received a quota of 22 fellow-
ships. However, due to a lack of quali-
fied applicants, only sixteen of the 22
fellowships have been awarded. These
were divided among four graduate and
twelve undergraduate students who
will study Slavic languages.
The stipend for the summer program
is $900 per student. Funds from the
fellowships not awarded will be used
for other summer programs.
About $6.6 million will be made
hvailable to 54 colleges and universities
to finance NDFL fellowships. Of this
amount, the University r e c e i v e d
$377,700, ranking seventh in the coun-
try behind Columbia, Harvard, the
University of Wisc6nsin, the University
of California at Berkeley and the Uni-
versity of Indiana at Bloomington.
Last year the University was initial-
ly awarded 89 academic year fellow-
ships, three more than it received this
year. However, since the program was
cut slightly this year, the University's

oreign
position in relation to other institutions
is basically unchanged.
NDFL fellowships are awarded to
qualified students who plan either to
teach at U.S. universities or colleges
or to obtain government or private
(nonprofit and nonsectarian) jobs that
contribute to the nation's foreign re-
lations and for which proficiency in a
program-supported language is desir-
able.
Students seeking NDFL fellowships
apply directly to any institution par-
ticipating in the program. Each year
universities and colleges offering ap-
propriate language and area studies
programs request fellowship allotments
from the U.S. Commissioner of Edu-
cation.
After the federal government deter-
mines the quota of awards for these
institutions, each college and univer-
sity decides which of its applicants
will receive a fellowship.
The University's Language and Area
Centers were awarded 14 fellowships
under .the Development Projects for
Individuals Program of the Mutual

Educational and Cultural Exchange
Act (Hays-Fulbright Act) Eleven fel-
lowships will go to graduate students
working on dissertations abroad. Of
these three will be used in East Asia.
three in Southeast Asia, two in the
Middle East and one each in East
Europe, South Asia and Latin America.
Although the University does not
have a Latin American center. Prof.
Charles Gibson of the history depart-
ment submitted a proposal for this
area. The University received more
graduate fellowships under this pro-
gram than any institution in the coun-
try.
Three faculty fellowships for re-
search will be granted to professors
who will spend nine to twelve months
abroad. Prof. Kenneth A. Luther of the
Near Eastern languages and literature
department will go to the Middle East.
Prof. William Zimmerman IV of the
political science department will go
to Eastern Europe and Prof. Aram A.
Yengoyan of the anthropology depart-
ment will go to Southeast Asia.

Two grants were awarded to the
University under the Program Develop-
ment Project of the Hays-Fulbright
Act.
One grant will bring Prof. Rama
Subbiah of the University of Malaya
to Ann Arbor to aid the University's
Southeast Asian studies program.
The other $37,000 grant will be used
by one history and three political
science graduate students, under the
guidance of Prof. Gayl Ness of the
sociology department, to conduct dis-
sertation research in the Philippines
for one year.
The graduate students will investigate
what and how secondary and profes-
sional school students learn about the
political world. They plan to work
separately and periodically meet to
discuss their progress.
Prof. Ness, aided by a research as-
sistant not supported by the govern-
ment, will study the emergence of
modern Filipino nationalism in the
early nineteenth century.

language grants

MGMOVITS ASTANLEY KUBRICK PRODUCTION

"An unprecedented
psychedelic roller
coaster of an,
experience.
-ife
"SVNER
BES VSUAl: EFFECTS',

SUPER PANAVISOI'4'. MTROCQLOR

FRAYNE BROS.
EXHIBITION of
Paintings and Objects
MAY 25-JUNE 15, 1969
EDIT IONS GALLERY
213 E. Washington.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 864-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
Cycles sell
in ClaSSifiedS

in tller
is nof for
KEEP
AMERICA
BEAUTIFUL

the
news today,
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
AUTHORITIES ESTIMATE VIOLENCE in Malaysia has left
500 people dead, thousands injured and millions of dollars in
property damage.
Deputy Prime Minister Tun Abdul Razak of the new emergency
government blamed opposition parties and the Chinese community
for recent violence.
Th emergency government has refused offers from opposition
leaders to cooperate in the government.
The government holds that-the need to restore law and order
excludes any political solutions, at least for the time being.
NORTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS yesterday sent rockets into
A Shau Valley where an American artillery base is located.
The North Vietnamese also skirmished with American para-
troopers near, Ap Bia Mountain, west of the valley.
A U.S. spokesman said paratroopers in A Shau Valley suffered no
casualties. Eleven North Vietnamese and two Americans have been
killed in the latest skirmish around Ap Bia Mountain.
THE HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE said yester-
day hungry people should be given more help although it dis-
counted some reports of wide-spread hunger and malnutrition.
The committee is considering the $6.? billion appropriation bill
of the agriculture department.
House action on the $651 milion earmarked to fight hunger and
malnutrition is slated for next week. Of that allotment, $311 million
was budgeted for children's food subsidy programs and $340 million
to provide food stamps at reduced prices for low-income families.
* * * *
THE COST OF LIVING rose .6 per cent in April, continuing
the sharpest price spiral in more than ten years, according to
government officials.
Economists say it may be six months, nine months or a year
before inflation can be appreciably slowed.
They contend consumers and corporations must share the blame
with the slowness of government to act last year.
* * * *
COUNCILMAN TOM BRADLEY, who could become the first
black mayor of Los Angeles, says municipal corruption is the
biggest issue of the campaign.
.Bradley said if he is elected on Tuesday he will set an example
of ethical conduct.
Mayor Sam Yorty, seeking a third term, says the issue is organ-
ized militancy.-
Yorty says Los Angeles is threatened by "a combination of bloc
voting, black power, left-wing radicals, and, if you please, identified'
Communists."
SOVIET PRESIDENT NIKOLAI PODGORNY announced
yesterday "any attempts by China to violate the. territorial in-
tegrity of the U.S.S.R. or Mongolia will be met with a crushing
rebuff."
Podgorny made this remark in a visit to the Mongolian capital of
Ulan Bator.
He accused Mao Tse-tung and his followers of "trying in every
possible way to undermine the friendly and brotherly relations existing
between socialist countries."

with JOHN SINGLETON COPLEY
GALA OPENING-2-6 T HIS SUNDAY
GALLERY HOURS - Saturday 10-4, Tuesday-Friday 10-6

Peru arms dispute
cuts Rockefeller trip

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-Associated Press
Sgt. Miehael Sanders
GI claims dissent
won himn Viet tour,

/ LIMA - - Peru declared
yesterday that Gov. Nelson A.
Rockefeller would ndt be wel-
come, and that U.S. military
advisers should leave t h e
country.
The decision c a m e after U.S.
Ambassador John Wesley Jones
formally notified the government
that Washington had suspended
arms sales to Peru because of the
seizures of American fishing boats.
Relations between t h e United
States and Peru's military-con-
trolledrregime have been at a low
ebb for months because of the ex-
propriation of an American-owned
oil company and the fishing ves-
sel seizures.
Actually the arms sales had been
suspendedin February, but neith-
er side openly acknowledged the
fact while negotiations were under
way to settle their dispute. Wash-
ington news reports broke the first
word earlier this week
Asked if the military govern-
ment had set a time for departure
of the U.S. Army, Navy and Air
Force missions, an official spokes-
man said, "They may leave from
this moment, whenever they like."
The communique was drawn up
-at a cabinet meeting presided by
President Juan. The statement
said: "The revolutionary. govern-
ment informs the people that to-
day (Friday) the Embassy of the
United States has officially con-
firmed the decision of the gov-
ernment of that country to sus-
pend the sale pf military equip-
ment to Peru.
"Consequently, t he measures
announced in t he official com-
munique of Tuesday will be'exe-
cuted."
The Tuesday communique had
stated that if the United States
officially confirmed a termination
of sale of military equipment then
a visit by Rockefeller would be
"inopportune."
The statement continued that
the presence in Peru of the army,
navy and air force missions of the
United States would have no fur-
ther purpose.
Washington's decision was con-
tained in a note delivered to For-
eign Minister Edgardo Mercado
yesterday morning by Ambassador
John Wesley Jones.
761-9001s
$1.00 OFF|
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WASHINGTON ) - A so-
dier in the Tomb of the Un-
known Soldier honor guard who
says the Army is trying to si-
lence his Vietnam war objections
by sending him to the combat
zone has won a temporary delay
in the transfer.
Sgt. Michael Sanders was
given the seven-day delay
Thursday night by secretary of
the Army Stanley Resor after

the two senators from Sanders'
home state of Kentucky inter-
vened.
Sanders, who has only seven
months to go before discharge,
had been due to report today to
Oakland, Calif., en route to Viet-
nam.
The young sergeant who also
served in the White House color
guard was a military escort to
Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower.

RDAY
NEES
X1.00
5:30

Chromosomes determine
the way ve look...
the way we love...
the way v hate...
the way we are.
46 Chromosomes make
a man.47..may makea kiler

eye-catcher
a Leyka, the
Zein n'e
ern undress.
pera lovers
want to see
they've

been missing all
these years."
-N.Y. Times

HAYLEY MILLS

She said no,
but he wouldn't Jet go.
TWISTED NERVE

I ~ ~ 'inmmnn Mho P,3

i

> :
Y''J

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