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May 21, 1969 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1969-05-21

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 21, 1969

Daily Classifieds
UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

1

The Texas Wedge

Kraft to bow out this weekend

LINES day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 10.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4 55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19. 75
25.55
31.40

4 days
3.00
4.05
4.05
4.65
6.35
7.20
7.90
9.70
10.30
10.30
17.85
25.50
33.45
41.40

5 days
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9.75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 days
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
11.45
12.60
13.30-
13.30
25.40
36.65
48.30
60.50

odd.
.60
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1.55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80

Additional costs per tiy after six days.
Ads that are 11/,, 21, 3 , etc. inch size will be billed at the
average of the lower and higher inch rate.

(Continued from Page 3)
PERSONAL
I WILL BUY your ticket to Europe. Call
Fred, 662-2282. 21F12
WANT to be a SWINGER- Ex erienced
tennis instructor looking for begin-
ners, guaranteed improvement!; Cal
GerrK 665-4258. 6F13
Yes !!
IFC Sing
Records
Are HERE.'
Song chairmen call 761-7306
for information.
18F12
PERSONABLE male grad, age 23. would
like to meet warm, intelligent, at-
tractive girl with a sense of humor.
Send particulars to Box 1,000, c/o The
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard. 20F16
IF you have a PIANO it probably needs
tuning. Expert tuner ,and technician
for Grinneis-U-M student. Discount
with this ad. Call Kim, 769-5651. 19F16
LEARN' THE FACTS before you buy-
there is more to a diamond than
meets the' eye. Austin Diamond, 1209
S. University, 663-7151. F
DRIVING TO ALASKA
Riders Wanted
Leave June 12, return July 15
Call Bob, 769-3480, 609 Hill St.'
17F12
WHY, NOT HAVE a sandwich delivered.
35c delivery charge. Orders $3.50 and
over free delivery. Whistle Stop, 662-
2270. 15F17
BUT WE don't own light green ban-
danas, and one of us was out of town!
FC
Creative Photography
WEDDINGS and portraits.. Professional
quality at student rates. Call John
Evans at 769-0868 or 761-3690 after 6
p.m. for appointment to see portfolio.
F
EXPERT TYPING of all kinds of
papers. Call Kathy Kohn at the
iMchigan Daily, 764-0562 or at home,
769-3566. 7 17
EARLY BIRD Special. 6 a.m. to 10 a.m.
,,..Eggs, bacon, toast and coffee, 69c
Whistle Stop, 611 S. Forest. 19F17
FIELD TRIP to USSR (three weeks,
two hours updergraduate chedit op-
tional) is being offered by the Uni-
versity's Dearborn Campus, July 4-25.
The group, limited to fifteen per-
sons, will visit places of interest in
Russia, the Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia,
the Caucasus, and on the Black Sea.
They will also meet with representa-
tives of government and student so-
cieties. For further information con-
tact: Prof. Dennis Papazian, U-M
Dearborn Campus, 4901 Evergreen Rd.,
Dearborn, Mich. 48128. Call 271-2300,
ext. 243. 10F17
BUSINESS SERVICES
FLOWER CHILD babysitting service-.
Mon.-Fri., 8-5. Call 663-4555 after 6
p.m. 3J12
STENCILS, THESIS, and term papers
typed in my home. 769-5441. Jl
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing, etc. IBM electric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 48Jtc
TRANSPORTATION
I NEED A RIDE to the Washington,
D.C., area. Call Fred, 662-2282. 6G,12
WANTED TO BUY
SOFA BED and elec. dishwasher. 769-
4765., 1K8
BARGAIN CORNER

USED CARS '
'59 FORD Station Wagon. Clean, reli-
able. $75. Call 663-9885. 15N12
'64 VW, EX. mech. cond., body rough.
$500. Call 761-0782. 14N12
'33 PLYMOUTH coupe, very good cond.,
Chevy powered with rumble seat.
Must sell. $600, Call 434-1320. 16N16
1968 VW-Dark blue, AM-FM radio.
Call 663-5585 after 7 p.m. 17N12
TRIUMPH TR3, 1961. New engine, steer-
ing, tires. Beautiful. $450. 663-0256.
11N12
'64 VW-GOOD condition, new tires.
Make an offer. 662-4049. N13
AUSTIN-HEALEY Sprite, '66. 22,000
miles; radio, good cond. $800. 769-4339.
12N13
1964 PONTIAC GTO. $895. Good cond.
Call 761-2916 betw. 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
13N14
OPEN 24 HOURS! Whistle Stop, 611 S.
Forest. Good Food. 14F17
PHOTO SUPPLIES
BAUER SUPER-8 movie camera. Excel-
lent'condition. $85. Call 761-6167. 2D13
WANT A real wide wide-angle? How
about a Nikkor 21mm f4 lens formall
you lucky Nikon F or Nikkormat
users. Including viewfinder it lists for
$226, yours for a mere $110 for this
gem of a lens. Call Richard Lee, 764-
6755 or 764-0553. Di
AUTO-NIKKER 200 mm fM telephoto
lens for Nikon F, Nikkormat, Includ-
ing case for only $165. Call Richard
Lee, 764-6755, 764-0553. D17
BRAND NEW, including guarantee -
BRAUN EF-300 electronic flash with
Nicad batteries, very powerful. Lists
at $199.50, yours for $150. Call Richard,
.764-6755. D
FOR SALE-Nikkor 24mm lens f 2.8
Wide Angle lens for Nikkormat, Nik-
kerrex, or Nikon F, FTN, etc. 1
month old, still under warranty, in
original box - Heretofore unavailable
in the area-$185. Call Andy, 761-
0273, 761-9092. D6
FOR SALE
CHEAP WINDOW FANS, couch, dress-
er, bookcase, ironing, extra long bed,
kitchen table and chairs. 665-0867.
13B14
RUMMAGE SALE - Sweaters, books,
records, old china, sound equipment
and other good stuff cheap. Thurs.
and Fri., May 22-23, after 6 p.m.
Garage of 916 Church. NO 3-4086. B13
MOVING, must sell king size matress,
box springs and frame, new. $317.
Used 4 months, $225 or best offer.
Call 971-0531. 14B11
EASY CHAIR, bookcase, b&w TV, mis-
cellaneous. Best offers. 663-3787 p.m.
15B13
1 ROLE of tweed CARPETING. 11x20.
Good condition. $50. Call 971-3309.
12B11
1960 CHEVY panel truck, runs well,
best offer over $300. Call 453-3452.
TWO CHARTER FLIGHT tickets. June
28TPrice' negotiable. Call 665-6976 after
5 p.m. l1Bl1
OSCILLOSCOPE. Signal generators and
power supplies. $150 for lot. Call 971-
1335. 9B17
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM & BOARD in private home.
Your "home away from home." 1
single, 1 to share suite. Graduates
(males) preferred. Call Mrs. Mills, 668-
9085. 1E16
MALE GRAD WANTED to, share 1
bdrm. apt. for fall and/or now. Call
769-5238. 44C14
AVAILABLE FOR FALL Occupancy-4
man apt., 2 blocks from business
school, 3 blocks from law school. Call
769-2608. '28Ctc

Hawthorne Vally Blues'
By DREW BOGEMA
I once had a double-eagle.
Really
A double-eagle, for those of you who have wisely ignored the
silly language of golf, is, to be modest, rare in the annals of golf
history. Birdies are commonplace. A pro, say on the level of
Nicklaus, Casper, or Palmer, will card several a round. An eagle
is less frequent, and generaly occurs on par fives when one has
hit the green in two and has sunk a long putt. A double-eagle is
phenomenal, and must, almost by definition take place on a
par five, since it would represent a score of zero on a par-three,
or a one on a par four.
This is going nowhere. Conscience is getting pissed off at all
this verbal claptrap that's under this column.
"This is nothing but foolish boasting," it vehemently
charged. "With all of the new forms that are being brought into
our stale, rotting Western culture, you're going to fool around
with dry memories of suburban escapism in bland Hawthorne
Valley?" it cried.
"YES," I replied, "for, as most psychologist would tell you,
one is shaped in their very early years. Rather than go through
the silly process of attempting to write editorials depicting the
horrors of world political struggle, or righteous exposes of the
dreadful flaws and cracks within our culture, which would only
be giving the reader a portrait of a personality through words,
I will be more direct, pointing my words right at the substance
revealed through writing. Hawthorne Valley was where it was
once at."
"Honkie bullshit," conscience replied.
"Well," I continued, growing ever more defensive, "you can
just shove it. I'm no Jack Kerouac, Phillip Roth, or Allen Gins-
berg ..."
"Christ," muttered conscience, "you can sure say that again."
"You should talk? What are you anyway? Just a piece of
flabby Calvinist tissue, which, forged under the evangelical
fervancy of suburban religion (about as zesty as milky Wheaties),
rapidly meldted when confronted with the burning atheism of
Ann Arbor. Hell, you didn't even come out against the War
until 1966. Remember that SDS convention in Ann Arbor that
summer? Where you made me passionately defend Lyndon Jhn-
son's action against North Vietnamese aggression? Where
Buckley tagged me with that label of being a 'wishy-washy
liberal'?
"You can't blame your bland personality on me," con-
science charged, growjng a bit edgy though.
"THE HELL I CAN'T, You're as responsive to change as
that bourgeois clique of fascists that run the nation. You never
even joined a subevrsive organization. Where's your politics
man? Ten to one, when the chips are down, yo 'll drop this
individual conscience-civil disobedinece thing ad march off
with the rest of the drones to kill gooks, collect ears, and juggle
casualty figures. You're nothing but petty bourgeoisie, no, just
1
petty."
Conscience dejectly walked back to the locker room, throw-
in his portable Goodman on the bench, his pocket Mailer to the
ground.
"Jesus," he told himself, "maybe you're a Puritan after all."
But to continue ...
Now although the scorecard measured the hole at five-
hundred-and-forty yards, and rated it a par five, in reality
the distance was closer to four-hundred-and-fifty, making it
no more than a tough four. And it was late fall, when the
ground hardens, giving your drive an extra twenty to thirty
yards on the roll. And there was a stiff breeze at my back, Hell,
it was a gale..
I stepped up to the tee, after taking a disastrous seven on the
hole imediately before, as my ball landed in someone's rain
trough.
Quit screwing around, I told myself, and, for a change, really
crank one.
SHAA-ZAAMI The ball flew off the head of the driver with
terrific speed, headed at a forty-five degree angle to the ground.
Seconds later it cleared the mammoth bunker that occupied the
middel of the fairway and landed near' row of trees on the
right side of the hole near the river, two hundred-and-seventy-
five yards out.
I walked to the ball In a state of nervous expectation. If I
coud place a four-iron shot on the green, close enough to the
pin, there was an outside chance I could grab an eagle. An eagle
would mean I would be one over par at the turn. With a birdie
on the easy sixth or ninth, combined with pars on seven and
eight, a par round would be in the offing.
I pulled out my trusty J. C. Higgens 1937 Bobby Jones
modeled four-iron, with its aluminum head and yellow wooden
shaft. Its grip had been lost over the winter, and I developed
fierce blisters from the slivers that would stick in my hand as
I gripped the club. But this was nothing. My father, I was told,
had walked five miles to school every morning in the midst of
the Depression.
I tried to concentrate and slow down my swing, lest my
brand-new Titlist duck-hook into the river.
I struck the ball. No divot; nothing. Expecting one, I didn't
follows the line of my shot as it headed for the green. Then I
caught it, as it bounced ten yards in front of the fringe, and
continued straight for the pin.
KEEP GOING, I CRIED. Closer, closer, a little more and

I'l have an eagle for sure. Only a three-foot putt.
It didn't stop at three feet. It kept rolling right for the pin,
hit it, and fell right into the hole.
I ran home, threw my clubs into the garage, and converged
on my father, who was sitting in the living room reading the
lpaper.
Dad, I just had a double-eagle!" I told him.
"Sure. Why the hell didn't you cut the grass yesterday?
No allowance for the rest of the month."
Discouraged, I ran into the kitchen to tell my mother.
"What's a double-eagle?" she replied. Before I could get in
a word, she said, "Your father is really angry with you for not
cutting the grass. Go cut it now before the neighbors get home
and see how shabby it looks."
They didn't believe me, no, they didn't care.. Screw the over-
thirties. What is grass to a golf pro on the make?

I By DAVE SCOTT
When Michigan meets Minne-
sota later this week, the Gop-
hers will be attempting to wrap
up its second straight Big Ten
title. To do so, however, they
will have to stop John Kraft,
the Wolverines' slugging left-
fielder.
Kraft has been Michigan's top
hitter throughout t h e current
season, batting well o v e r the
.300 mark.
Kraft, a catcher by trade, was
shifted to left field this season
when Pete Titone landed t h e
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR*
BILL DINNER
top receiving spot. "I don't
think Moby (Michigan coach
Moby Benedict) trusts my field-
ing yet, he looks kind of ner-
vous whenever a ball is hit my
way," he says. Though Kraft
has only one error in 26 games,
he feels his defense needs a lot
of work. "I try to catch every-
thing that comes my way, and
sometimes the ball gets by me."
Would he prefer catching?
"Definitely, I love to catch and
to call the game. I like being in
on every pitch," Kraft com-
mented.
John got started catching

when he was seven in his home-
town of Franklin, Michigan. "It
was a nine year old's league, but
I was the only one willing to
catch," he commented. "Besides,
my mother was t h e manager.
She and Dad have been my
number one and two fans ever
since,"
Kraft continued his journey
into baseball via Little League,
American Legion League, a n d
most any league t ha t would
have him; few turned him away.
At North Farmington High
School he developed into an All
Conference catcher.
Colleges took notice. "I could
have gone to Eastern on a full
ride, but I wanted to play in the
Big Ten." Though lacking a
scholarship, Kraft joined the
Wolverines. "When I wasn't
playing much I had some second
thoughts, but now that I'm a
starter, I'm sure Michigan was
the right choice," the slugger
observed.d
John Kraft's~arrival at Michi-
gan was marked by a .393 aver-
age as a sophomore, though he
played only half the games due
to defensive weaknesses.
Th'is y e a r, as a regular, he
holds not only Michigan's top
batting average, but also heads
the list in extra base hits and
has figured among the Big Ten's
top sluggers. When asked about
this, he replied, "I swing as hard
as I can at every pitch. People
tell me to hold back sometimes,
but I don't do well that way."
Kraft's hard swinging had
helped keep Michigan in con-

Chicago to reinstate football;
Van Breda Koif Piston coachI
By The Associated Press
0 CHICAGO-Varsity football, dormant since 1939 at the Uni-
versity of Chicago after a glorious run under Amos Alonzo Stagg, is
being revived this fall, it was announced yesterday.
The Maroons, once the scourge of the Big Ten, have played in-
formal games and have had football classes since 1963. Now varsity
letters will be awarded.
Chicago, a member of the Big Ten since 1896, withdrew from
football after the 1939 season. It left the Big Ten in 1946, unable to
field representative teams in any sport.
* * * *.
@ DETROIT-Nearly the entire professional basketball world
knows Bill van Breda Kolff is the new unofficial head coach of the
National Bosketball Association Detroit Pistons.
But the poorly kept secret was expected to be made official at
a news conference phis morning.
"We don't want it announced before 9:30 a.m., although it's really
no secret at this stage," said a Piston's spokesman Tuesday.
S PHILADELPHIA-In a sweeping reorganization, the. Phila-
delphia Flyers of the National Hockey League named Vic Stasiuk
head coach Keith Allen upstairs into the front office.
Flyers' excutives said it was fulfillment of a plan made three
years ago, but until last week, Allen was headed for at least another
year as coach and Stasiuk was a fixture at Quebec in the American
Hockey League.
FIFE DISASTER:
Wolverine basmen split

tention ini the Big Ten baseball
race, but the: team's play has
been marked by inconsistancy,
particularly on the mound and
in the field.
When it was suggested that
the difference between perform-
ance in conference a n d non-
conference p 1 a y might be at-
tributed to inferior t e a m s.
Kraft retorted, "The Big Ten is
one of the toughest leagues in
the country, but we had a lot of
games to prepare for Big Ten
play and besides, it's only nat-

4

ural to be up f o r conference
games."
Only a few conference games
remain for John Kraft, a sen-
ior, and soon he. and his wife
Joan will leave Michigan.
As a possible alternative to
the pros, Kraft, a physical edu-
cation major, showed interest in
coaching. "If I could teach a
high school team w i t h every-
thing Moby taught us they'd be
untouchable," the left fielder
mused. The thought seemed to
fascinate him-

I

Major League Standings
........:.:::.......,.%.M..'. . .....::4:4 ..:4..'::: .: .:::...
. a~wiik.Trl,.T T~l " TYNT IOAL TLEAGUE.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB

tx

Baltimore 27 13 .675
Boston 21 -13 .618
Detroit 18 16 .526
Washington 20 20 .500
New York 18 21 .462
Cleveland 8 23 .258
West Division
Oakland 21 13 .618
Minnesota 20 13 .606
Chicago 15 16 .484
Kansas City 16 20 .439
Seattie 15 20 .429
California 11 22 .333
Yesterday's Results
Detroit 7, Chicago 6
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 1
Minnesota 3, Baltimore 2
Washington 6, Seattle 5
New York 2,' Oakland 1
California at Boston, ppd., rain
Today's Games
Detroit at Chicago, night
Kansas City at Cleveland, night
Minnesota at Baltimore, night
Seattle at Washington, night
Oakland at New York, night
California at Boston, night

GB
3
6
7
get
14 ,
4
6
6T:
91 i,

*

xChicago
New York
xPittsburgh
xSt. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Wes'
Atlanta
xLos Angeles
xSannFrancisco
Cincinnati
xSan Diego
Houston

24 13
17 18
16 17
15 19
11 22
t Division
24 10
21 13
20 15
16 19
16 23
16 24

.649
.486
.457
.441
.333
.706
.618
.571
.457
.410
.400

1
3
84T
10'-:
11i:

x-late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 0
Houston 5, Montreal 0
Pittsburgh at San Diego, inc.
Chicago at Los Angeles, inc.
St. Louis at San Francisco, inc.
Today's Games
New York at Atlanta, night
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, night
Montreal at Houston, night
Pittsburgh at San Diego, night
Chicago at Los Angeles, night
St. Louis at San Francisco

Special To The Daily
MT. PLEASANT-The Michigan
baseball team split a double-
header with Central Michigan yes-
terday, winning the first game in
11 innings 7-5, and losing the
second 5-2 on a disastrous first
inning pitching by Dan Fife.
In the first game, a three and
a half hour marathon, Central
Michigan jumped out to a quick 4
run lead in the first inning. Mich-
igan's John Ritter then settled{
down and yielded only one more
run in the fifth when he was re-
lieved by the eventual winner,
I Gerry Christman.

In the second game the Wol-
verines just couldn't get started
and were abetted by Dan Fife who
would have had a hard time hit-
ting the side of a barn. Fife gave
up five walks, hit two batters, and
threw two wild pitches before be-
ing lifted with two men on and no
one out in the second.

41

CM

FIRST GAME
002 102 000 02-7 8 2
400 010 000 00-5 13 4
SECOND GAME
002 000 002-2 7 2
320 000 OOx-5 5 1

'4-

1

Cm

DAILY OFFICIAL

---

BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 3)
Manager, degree in Indust. Rel/Per-
sonnel, exper. Asst. to Vice Pres for
Sales, degree and proven record in sales
and sales mgmt. Controller, degree and
strong exper in controls, auditing exper
pref. Cost Syst, Mgr, degree and exper
in all areas of cost.
ITT Data Services, Paramus, N. J.'-
Data Processing Sales Representatives,
degree and 2 years in DP Sales, good
bckrnd in DP service applications.
State of Oregon, Park Lands Super-
visor, degree and 4 years tech. exper in
admin., dev. of parks a n d recreation
plans, design of utilities, and park fa-
cilities.
State of Wisconsin - Lndscpe. Arch.
Libr. Tech, Office Machine Operator.
Conservation Wardin. Curator, Fid. and
ResearchArcheologist. Public Utility
Rate Anal. and other career candidate
positions for college graduates.
State of North Carolina - Artist Ill-
ustrator. Puppeteer with State Board of
Health, college work in drama. Research
and Statistics positions. Community
Services Assistants and Consultants.
IResearch and Training Center in Vo-
cational Rehabilitation, West Virginia-
Associate Director of Training, PhD or
Ed. D. and exper in areas of educ., trng.
ed. admin., couns, rehab., guid,, ed.
psych.
§ SUCCESSFUL §
MEDITATION
§ is an Art-one that YOU can §
master. However, you must
have the proper atmosphere,
and follow the correct proced- §
ure. You must be shielded from
§ outside magnetic influences by
§your own Personal Meditation §
Robe. §
LOBSANG §
§ RAMPA §
Tibetan Lama and
Famous Author §
s the Man Who
Knows. Let Dr.
Rampa instruct
you in the Art of Meditation.
Gain the inestimable benefits
. ... Peace, Tranquility, Inner
Harmony, Knowledge . . . that
§ can be yours so easily.
"MEDITATION FOR
THE MILLIONS"
§ LOBSANG RAMPA
MEDITATION AIDS §
Meditation Robe (made espe-
S cially for YOU;
indicate S, M, L ... $25.00§
S"Meditation," a 33V3 rpm §
F § LP Phono disc (instructions
by Dr. Rampa himself) 4.95
Meditating Figure .......5.00
Rampa Meditation Incense §
& t.ihPof nst.... ....3.0 §

TEACHER PLACEMENT
Overseas "Teaching Positions - The
following schools have listed teaching
vacancies for September, 1969.
Dominican Republic - Carol Morgan
Schools, Santo Domingo. Music (Grades
1-12), Biology/Earth Science, Interme-
diate Science (Grades' 5,6), Elem.
(Grade 1).
Vietiane Laos - American School of
Vientiane. English (prin. Jr. High), Jr.
High M a th, Biology/Gen. Science,
French (sec. & Intermed. grades) Span-
ish (sec. & intermed. grades), Girls PE,
Elementary (intermed.), Elem. (Grades
1 thru 4 located in branch school in
Pakse).
Japan - Tokyo, Nagoya & Osaka. The
Nikko Shoji Co. is interested in hiring
teachers of English as a Foreign Lan-
guage for its employees. 30 hours per
week, 2 year contract to begin imme-
diately.
F aor additional information contact
Mrs. Flynn, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

If you are a full-time
GRAD STUDENT
FACING INDUCTION
but have not received an undergraduate Il-S since
June 30, 1967, please see the
DRAFT COUNSELING CENTER
immediately

I

502 E. Huron, 769-4414

NOTICE-
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics
FREE Graduate Workshop
For Graduates of Reading Dynamics Only
Wednesday, May 28-1 .M 1o. P.M
NORTH CAMPUS COMMONS
Valley Room
FOR RESERVATION CALL 353-5111
or Mail Note to
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics
17320 W. 8 Mile Rd.
Southfield, Mich. 48075
-F

Vii..

0

Sam's Store
LEVI'S Galore For
Gals and Guys!
LEVI DEN IMS:
Button Fly.... 5.9
(Guaranteed to Shrink)
Super Slims ......$6.00
Pre-Shrunk
Dungarees.......$6.50
Now Levi Denims
for Gals ........$6,00

Immediate Occupancy
One Bedroom
$145/mo. $50 damage deposit, carpet-
ing, drapes, appliances, carport, all
utilities except electricity. Married 'or
grad. only. 971-8488. 37Ttc
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA 50. Reasonable. Good cond. 764-
2560. 812
Honda of Ann Arbor
3000 Packard at Platt-971-4500
serving U of M since 1963
9Ztc
305 CC HONDA, 1966-Great shape. Call
Paul at 761-7060. 7Z11
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND on Walnut St. Sat. night-1
man's watch. Call P. R. Muck, 761-
9167. Ala
LOST-Glasses in black and white case.
Betw. Hosp. and S. Division. 761-9801.
2A1 1
FOUND-Gold Bulova girl's watch in
front of LSA Bldg. Either call or
come in at The Daily. A14
HELP! LOST in Er Packard area -
Brownish-grey tom cat; long-haired;
wearing collar and tag; named Kosh-

iscoun1t records, inc.
300S. Stae-1235 S. University
NOW IN STOCK!

FROM UNITED ARTISTS

LEVI'S STA PREST:
"White" Levis
(5 Colors)
Nuvo Hopsack
"Stitches" ..... .
S-T-R-E-T-C-H.
"White"sLevis .
(5 Colors)

$6.98
$8.00
.$6.98
$4.98

A4

rAlf

---

WANTED

BELL BOTTOM LEVI'S
NOW IN STOCK,

Personnelfor UAC Summer
Committees'

- ; I

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