100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1969 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wedn+esdoy, May 7, 1969.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pac

Wednesday, May 7, 1969THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ORMANDY, ORMANDY
Ma Festial: Deja Vu'

Regents
close 'U'

_.a

Rent strike accepts
eviction arbitration

Daily Classiiueds

(Continued from Page 2)
prisingly energetic performance
that almost managed to sur-
mount the numerous failings of
the chorus.
This Mass, unlike Schubert's
exquisite E-flat major Mass,
makes little use of soloists, but
when they were called upon,

Maria Stader, Joanna Simon,
John McCollum and Willis Pat-
terson sung movingly. It seemed
a shame to bring a singer the
stature of Maria Stader all the
way to Ann Arbor, and then
make so little use of her excel-
lent skills.
The concluding fifth concert

* Lomax discusses
'rolein society

(Continued from Page 1)
It is a sin not to go find out,"
he explained.
Lomax maintained, for exam-
ple that black studies must not
mean therapy for students but
rather provide tools to deal with
society.
At an open panel discussion
yesterday, Lonnie Peek, presi-
dent of the Association of Black
Students at Wayne State Uni-
versity, said, like Lomax, that
black studies must be designed
to meet the needs of the comp,
munity.
Engineers and urban designers
who decide where the roads go
in and which homes are de-
stroyed or left must have an
awareness of the black com-
munilty, Peek explained.
Ronald C. Harris, 'chairman
of the black Student Union and

one of the original pla""ers of
the conference, said that Afro-
American centers will bring to-
gether social critics who are
aware of what is going on. These
centers will be developed into
types of brain trusts where peo-
ple can find out how to change
the institutions that affect them
daily, he said.
Harris believes these centers
would open a "crack in the wall"
although there would not be any
immediate sweeping changes.
Other resource people attend-
ing the conference include Ivan-
hoe Donaldson, a fellow of the
Institute for Policy Studies in
Washington, D.C., who also
spoke at the panel discussion;
Norman Hodges, professor of
history at the Hampton Insti-
tute, and Regent Otis Smith,
former Michigan Supreme Court
Justice.

was, all things considered, a dis-
appointment. After a shaggy
and mannered performance of
Mozart's "Paris" Symphony, one
of the world's most respected
singers, Regine Crespin, took the
stage with a decolletage ample
enough to make you just want
to lay down your head and
slumber.
But Miss Crespin has a voice
that lets you do anything but
slumber: its volume and reserve
are enormous, her low register
wonderfully firm, her enuncia-
tion anddramatic ability com-
mendable, and her sensitivity
well-trained. Yet I did not enjoy
her recital of either Beethoven's
"Ah, perfido," or Ravel's "She-
herazade," primarily b e c a u s e
when she sang loudly and in
the upper registers, her voice
took on a slightly grating, steely
quality, tightened at the edges.
Especially in the Ravel setting
of the Klingsor poems, the voice
needs a much greater melliflu-
ence for the subtle gradations
of tone and meaning. Miss Cres-
pin has sounded much better on
records and indeed she seemed
nervous before the harmless Ann
Arbor audience.
And so, four days and five
concerts later, I emerged from
Hill resolved not to play any
more records for at least a
month . . . well, would you
believe twenty-four hours?

Continued from Page 1) sawyers representing landlords at
Sch ool The complaint also covers, be- District Judge Pieter Thomassen's
sides the 91 strikers, "all organi- suggestion.
zations they represent or belong Ten cases were settled last week
Continued from Page 1i to, including the so called Ten- without juries for strikers who de-
also attended the meeting. These ants Union and anyone involved manded jury trials when they
professors say the school has been in it, and all co-conspirators failed to pay jury fees.
valuable to them as a research fa- whether named or not." Jack Becker and Graydon H.
Ellis Jr., two attorney for land-
cility and should not be closed. It asks that the defendants be lords, said jury trials in the re-
The administration has de- restrained and enjoined from, maining cases might not have
The dminstrtion has e- soliciting, requesting or impor-benpsilutlJlyoAgs,
scribed the closing as a financial tuning others to breach contracts been possible until July or August,
necessity. This view has been sup- existing or in their inception, or while the arbitration will begin
ported by a special blue ribbon today.
commission on the education cordance with existing contracts The agreement to handle 101
school which issued its report in orfuture contracts." cases through arbitration would
March. not automatically apply to any fu-
Besides the injunction, the land- ture cases landlords or tenants
One key factor in the Regents lords are seeking $10,000 in in- may initiate.
decision to close the school may dividual damages and $300,000 in Berry said that the rent strike
have been recent indications from exemplary damages and recovery will return to jury trials if arbi-
the State Legislature that it of more than $100.000 of unpaid tration proves unsatisfactory.
would not continue to support the rent being held in escrow. He added that arbitration is
school. The landlords originally, sought more convenient because many
President Robben Fleming last a temporary injuction against strikers are out of town for the
month received a letter from Rep, withholding of rent and ordering summer.
William Copeland, chairman of the transfer of the $100,000 to the Berry explained that the rent
the powerful House Appropriations local court's jurisdiction. The strike expects to win some rent
Committee, which stated the Uni- money is in a Canadian bank. reductions from Thomassen. Last
versity's "priorities cannot afford However, last Wednesday the week Thomassen ruled in ten cases
the continuation of that facility hearing on the temporary injunc- and reduced back rents in three.
(the school) in its current use." tion was halted when attorneys for However, the tenants were ordered
his statement to the Regentsthe landlords and the rent strike to pay court costs and the land-
Ihis, who is president of Uni agreed to drop the temporary suit lords were awarded possession in
versity School Parent-Teachers in order to avoid duplication of all the cases.
Organization, made what appeared effort and speed up the process
to be a last ditch proposal to save Circuit Judge William Ager will
tohe alast dhear the permanent injunction
thecase. Ager also heard the tempo-
He suggested that enrollment rary case.
and class size in the school be in- The agreement to submit 101 , ..
creased, with the addition of a cases to binding arbitration was infl lassifieds
significant number of students made by Ronald D. Glotta, attor-
from disadvantaged homes. ney for the rent strikers, and 10()_

FOR SALE
MANUAL SMITH-CORONA Typewriter.
Ex, cond. Call 665-0573. BI
FOR RENT
ESPECIALLY attractive apartment for
summer sublet, 2-4 people; $175/mo.
Cali 761-3595 mornings or evenings.
02
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
Incoming freshman medical student
Iwould like another freshman med
student to share a two-man, two bed-
room apt. If interested contact:
Howard Grossbard
Box 524, Hobart College
Geneva, New York 14456. C3
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL - Reduced. Very
attractive paneled, carpeted, furnish-
ed rooms for men or women. House
refrigerator and phone. Leases thru
June, August, or longer. $8-$11 week.
Call 663-5666, 662-7992, or 971-6270. C4
OWN BDRM. for male grad. 7 room
house. Cheap. Call 665-6263. 05
F'ALL RENTALS
1111 S. STATE
401 E. MADISON
1035 WALL STREET
near Medical Center
2, 3, & 4 MAN
Modern, well kept, furnished, air con-
ditioned, privately owned-References
_Ask our tenants.
One & Two Bedrooms Available
Call 1-864-3852
or 1-353-7389
039
DON'T BE
LEFT OUT!
Get in one of the
few remaining,
1 -2-3 Bedroom units
available at...
Arbor
Manor
townhouses
For as little as
$103.00
per month
Ypsilanti-Ann Arbor area
Phone 484-1210
OffiialIndinaplia500 ace CarCam ro 5 Co veribl C

HELP WANTED
"DO YOUR THING"-Immediate open-
ings in young publishing company
for ad space salesmen/saleswomen.
Work in your city or travel the USA,
Salary, commission and car expenses.
Call Collect (312) 726-9326 or send
resume to J and J Publications, Inc.,
153 North Michigan Ave., Chicago,
Illinois 60601, H1
PERSONNEL ASSISTANT
SECRETARY TO
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR
WE NEED: A college gfaduate with
some work in psychology and with
acceptable clerical skills to double as
Secretary and Personnel Assistant.
Preliminary testing and interviewing
requliring pleasant personality and
good grooming. Sohne experience de-
sirable.
WE OFFER: Good pay; permanent,
steady employment; pleasant sur-
roundings in downtown Detroit.
WRITE: Personnel Director, Detroit
Free Press, 321 W. Lafayette, Detroit
46231.
Give full details of education and
experience. H2
DAYTIME BABYSITTER, 2 or 3 times
weekly, 3-5 hours daily. Call 971-7364.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for cheerful 21
year old boy. M, t W 4F, 12:30-3:30.
Near campus. Call 662-1684. H4
HISTO-TECHNOLOGISTS
CYTO-TECHNOLOGISTS
Needed for immediate employment.
ASCP registered or eligible. Excellent
salary and benefits. Apply Sparrow
Hospital Personnel, Lansing, or call
collect 1-517-487-6111, ext. 333, H5
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Yellow mutt, smale male, short
ears, pink nose, chain collar, rabies
tag, very friendly. Reward. Phone 662-
7992 or 764-8377. Al
PHOTO SUPPLIES
BRAND NEW, including guarantee -
BRAUN EF-300 electronic flash with
Nicad batteries, very powerful. Lists
at $199.50, yours for $150. Call Richard,
764-6755. D
ZEISS CONTAFLEX SUPER, 35 mm.,
115 mm., lenses, acc. Best offer. 971-
1368. DI
BUSINESS SERVICES
STENCILS, THESIS, and term papers
typed in my home. 769-5441.,* Ji
'USED CARS
A SET OF little used tires (8x14) will
be sold. Extra bonus: get 1957 Opel
Caravan (sta. .) for spare parts. Call
Peter at 764-2395 (days) or 665-8517
(nights). N1
1965 TEMPSET, 8 cylinder ,superb con-
dition, $975. Call 761-5950. N2
SUMMER SUBLET
THIRD FEMALE NEEDED. Grad or pro-
fessional. Modern 2 bdrm. apt. Con-
venient location, Call 761-2059. U2

It""- -

IF YOU LEAD A
i QUIET LIFE
Then the DAILY
DISPLAY ADVERTISINC
STAFF is the place
for you!

Why is Camar9
the pace car a gain?

om

G

1

Join the New
Generation of Readers
We can teach you to read
faster - (3-4-5 Times Faster)
with better comprehension

Summer
Sules

Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics For
Improved
* Grades
" Concentration
" Comprehension'
" Study Skills
" Recall Skills
" Research Skills

with Rally Sport equipment and new Super Scoop hood.
Because its the Hugger.
Camaro SS has been chosen to be the Indy 500 up suspension and power disc brakes.
pace car for the second time in three years. That's The transmission comes linked to a 3-speed floor
because it has vf'hat it takes. shift. If you want still more, there's a 4-speed Hurst
Engine choices start with a standard 300-hp shifter available.
350-cuf-in. Turbo-Fire V8 and run up to a 325-hp Indy's tough. So's Camaro SS.
396-cu.-in. Turbo-Jet job. There's even a new Wnis to. So's.mar S S.
Super Scoop hood you can order. It opens on When it comes to pacesettig, it's pretty clear
acceleration, pouring cooler air into the engine for that Camaro knows its way around.
more go power. Start setting a pace of your own. At your
The SS version of the Hugger grips the road with Chevrolet dealer's now.
wide-oval tires on A4 x 7-inch-wide wheels, beefed- Putting you first, keeps us first.
- Pacesetter Values at our Sports Department.

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

We have a complete listing of
apartments. that will Abe available
for this summer.
Campus
Management
337 E. Huron
662-7787
11
WANTED-MALE ROOMMATE
FOR SUMMER
$45 per month
to share furnished 3 room apartment
at 538 N. State St.
Generous closet space
Storage room in basement
Large well equipped kitchen
Near Farmer's Market
15 minutes from Diag by foot
Begin last week April
CALL JOE PATTERSON, 764-3353
U36
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA 305 cc Scrambler. Call 769-5718.
zl
YAMAHA 350. 1967 model YRI. Low
mileage, very fast, excellent condition,
Many extras. $500. Call 764-6711 any-
time. Z.
HONDA 160, helmet, tools. Call 761-
7924 after 7 p.m. Z3

MRS. EVELYN WOOD

Join the new generation of readers. They are students, ad.
ministrators, congressmen, educators, businessmen, executives,
professional people and housewives, who read more in less
time, are better informed. They are more competitive, de-
rive more pleasure from reading, and achieve improved grades
in their studies.
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics can teach you to read 3, 4,
5 times faster with equal or better comprehension. The
The Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics teaching staff has thse
background of over 400,000 successfully completed students,
including the staff of the late Presidenit Kennedy, and his
brother Senator Edward Kennedy.
Thousands of Michigan people have been taught to read 3, 4,
5 times faster with equal or better comprehension. You can,
too! Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics will guaranteed to refund
your tuition if you do not triple your reading efficie-cy.
Free Introductory
Reading Lesson

I

72aftr7pm

Wednesday, May 7
N. Campus Commons
Valley Room
6 &98p.m..

Thursday, May 8
Holiday Inn
U.S 23 &
washtenaw
12,6 & 8p.m.

Friday, May 9
hIoward Johnson's
U.S.-23 &
Washtenaw
6 & 8 p.m.

i2
JACK HAND-is one of The Associated Press byline writers cov-
ering sports for this newspaper. He's typical of the talented world-
wide AP staff that brings you perceptive accounts of sports events
and the people who make them-on and off the field.
Jack writes with the expert's knowledge on almost any sport, but
specializes in baseball, football and boxing. He's on first-name basis
with great and small in those fields. Why not? Jack's been writing
national and international snrts for AP sine i(;_ That1' 4IrP

If You Cannot .Attend a Demonstration
call collect 313-353-5111 or mail coupon

Evelyn Wood

.100. .....,.. 4 .. ,. C7Cf.., ....:'?Q .... ::> ... ..

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan