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May 17, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f

MONDAY LUNCHEON
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
Buffet .25
ROBERT ANTHONY, Physics Dep't.
TOPIC: Finding Mankind on
Nature's Evolution
MRS& SEAMAN'S
SOUND BAND.
t
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 9 p.m.
$1.00 MAY 16-17
hcaving fun and making mrerry

second front page

ar4p

Sfri~jn

taai

NEWS PUqE: 7640552
BUSINESS 1'ONE: 764-0554

I

S-nA

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Teachers'

vote

L

WvvANTED
Personnel for UAC Summer.
Publicity, Publications, Summer,
Blues Festival, University Services
'MASS MEETING
Wednesday, May 21, 7:30 P.M.
Union, Rm 3A

MILITARY SPENDING will not be drastically reduced even
if the war in Vietnam ends, Defense Secretary Melvin Laird said
yesterday.
"Even If we eliminate cost over-runs, improve our cost estimates,
cut out .the unnecessary items and keep our systems simple, we are
not "going to come up with a low defense budget," Laird said. "A,
drastically reduced budget will not provide adequate national security
in the world in which we live."
Laird said his department "needs all the constructive help we
can get," but he called "unfortunate" criticism that "lashes out in
vague terms at the military structure."
Deputy Secretary of Defense David Packard, who went to the
Pentagon from the upper echelons of the electronic industry, said
he rejected the thedry that "the military-industrial complex is a factor
in determining our level of spending." He added, "I think the whole
thing is really a bunch of nonsense."
THE APOLLO 10 LAUNCH CREW last night discovered a
possible leak in the spacecraft's fuel system that could affect
Sunday's scheduled lunar orbital launch.
Space agency officials said they hoped the trouble was minor
and that it could be corrected. They ordered that the count down be
continued while the problem was being studied.
Earlier in the day mission director George Hage had reported
all aspects of the mission were ready, and launch operations manager
Paul Donnelly said launch preparations were running from four to
five hours ahead of the countdown schedule.
Two of the astronauts, Air Force Col. Thomas P. Stafford and
Navy Cmdr. John W. Young spent several hours inside a trainer
spaceship practicing rapid actions they would have to take if their
Saturn 5 booster rocket were to misfire during the launch.
"It's definitely the riskiest of any mission; the only one that will
be more risky is the landing itself," Stafford said.
Twice during the eight-day flight, Stafford and Cernan are to
fly a LEM landing craft over the moon's surface nine miles above
the intended site where two Apollo 11 astronauts are to land July 20.
*. * * *
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION appears headed for a col-
lision with House Democratic committee chairman over the
President's rejection of a proposed $192.9 billion ceiling on
federal spending.
Budget Director Robert Mayo told the Senate Appropriations
Committee he is opposed to the ceiling voted Thursday by the House
Appropriations Committee, even though it is the same as the budget
submitted to Congress last month by President Nixon.r
He said a ceiling would not provide sufficient flexibility' to deal
with unpredictable changes in spending on such uncontrollable items
as Vietnam farm price payments, and the interest on the national
debt.
STRIKING HOSPITAL WORKERS in Charleston, S.C. will
not starve, a union spokesman says.
"It's a tight squeeze, but the donations and the promise of con-
tinued help indicates the emergency needs of the strikers will be met
as long as they have to be met," Dave Prostn said yesterday. Prostn,
a member of the national organizing committee of the Nation Drug
and Hospital Workers Union, AFL-CIO, estimated about $10,000 comes
in weekly to support the strikers.
About 400 black non-professional workers are striking against the
state-operated Medical College Hospital and the Charleston County
Hospital. They are seeking higher pay and recognition of the New
York based union-or some type of employes' association-as their
bargaining agent with the state and county governments. Their wages
now range from $1.30 an hour to $2.05 an hour.

~Associated Press

Ready to go
Final preparations for the Apollo 10 launch were made yesterday.
A fuel leak was discovered and fixed as the countdown continued.
The spacecraft will be launched Sunday at 12:49 p.m. for its
eight-day lunar orbit.

favors stri~ke i~n
Chi~cago schools
CHICAGO (A-Union teachers voted two-to-one yesterday
in favor of staging their first strike against Chicago's public
schools on Thursday, May 22.
John Desmond, president of the Chicago Teachers Union,
said the vote was 10,944 in favor of the strike and 5,438
against
Desmond told newsmen' that teachers are "pretty well
disgusted with the school system and it's time to make
change."
The union, an affiliate of the American Federation of
Teachers, wants a raise of $150 a month, effective in Septem.
ber, a limitation on size off

ELECTRIC MUSIC:

West Park lives

i

(Continued from Page 1)
"I hope it will pass," the
mayor added.
After the meeting yesterday,
Borut said the city would try
to rotate the concerts in the
future by using a different park
each week.
Skip Taube, spokesman for
the concert enthusiasts, said,
"Sure I'm pleased." "All the
power to the people," he added
on his way out of City Hall.
The resolution prohibiting el-
ectric music had been intro-
duced to council last summer
after the city received com-
plaints of "excess noise" from
residents in the West Park area.
In addition to the prohibition
on amplified music, the ordi-
nance says "No person shall use.
the West Park Band Shelf for
any type of public show or per-
formance without written per-
mission granted by the Super-
intendent of Parks and Recrea-;
ation."
Such permission must be ob-
tained one week in advance of

"SENSUAL, THE THINGS PEOPLE WILL
DO TO AMUSE THEMSELVES ON THE
COTE D'AZUR IN WINTER!"
-Newsweek
A DEVIATE*
DOCEVITA Tme
"cooest, wryest treatment
of a menage containing
homosexuals of both sexes."r IFE
MAKES"AND ISABEL
LOOK TAME.ue

the event, the resolution adds.
In last summer's vote Council-
man Leroy Cappaert (D-nth
ward) was the only dissenting
vote.' He said at the time that
the proposal does "in effect pro-
hibit" all rock music in the city.
At last Monday's council
meeting, Taube presented peti-
tions with the signatures of
3,000 people who want the con-
certs reinstated. He told coun-
.cil that meetings earlier in the
month with Lt. Eugene Staud-,
enmaier had yielded little posi-
tive action.
Although the concert partici-
pants would have faced possible
fines or arrest if the event had
gone on in defiance of the ordi-
nance, presumably now music
shall permeate Ann Arbor on
Sunday afternoons unimpeded
by possessors of sensitive ears.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier. $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: *2.50, by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

classes and no cutbacks in
personnel or programs.
Current wage s c a le s vary.
Teachers with bachelors' degrees,
for example, earn $7,350 a year.
Mayor Richard J. Daley has
offered to mediate - offering a
chance that the strike may be
averted.
Asked whether he thought the
teachers would actually go on
strike, Desmond answered, "The
future will hold that answer, the
decision-making will come later."
Desmond said the teachers uniion
will look for support from other
Chicago unions and he expects a
statement about this to be issued
next week.
He said that it would take a
vote of the full membership to
stop the strike, -but added that
the union's House of Represent-
atives could recommend the strike
be called off or postponed if prog-
ress was being made on the union's
demands.
The union has 19,000 members
in the public school system. Teach-
ers, including those who don't be-
long to the union, total 23,000.
There are 523 schools.
The union deals with the Board
of Education. But there is another
potent party in the complex con-
troversy-the Illinois Legislature.
The board faces a $54 million
deficit in the last six months of
this year. That will force a cut-
back in teachers and programs
unless there is a big hike in state
aid.
The state currently guarantees,
at least $400 a year per pupil. Gov.
Richard B. Ogilvie has proposed to
raise it to $520. School Supt,
James Redmond and Desmond
have asked a boost to $600.'
Redmond, 'who is in the posi-
tion of a man who can't offer cash
he hasn't got, said a strike would
injure the city's chances of get-
ting the additional state funds it
needs.
And Ogilvie has termed the
union's strike threat ridiculous.

Arrest two
In police
squabble
(Continued from Page 1)
hams and Bingham had been ar-
rested Thursday night.
IHarris and Wheeler talked with
the sheriff's department command
officers and, Olson concerning the
release on bond of Abrahams and
Binghamn, sheriff's deputies said.
Sheriff's men said they inform-
ed Harris and Wheeler that the
arrested men could be 'released on
bond by \a district Judge.
District Judge Pieter G. V.
ThomasseA was then called to his
office where' Abrahams was ar-
raigned. Thomassen' set bond at
$75., Abrahams 'was released after
it was posted.
'Officials were unable to secure
the immediate release of Bingham
because he was $5,000 arrears in
support' payments and was held in
jail" on a writ of attachment filed
against him, Sheriff's Detective
Lt. Stanton L. Bordine reported.
Wheeler said last night he had
been told the amount: Bingham
was in arrears' was "considerablyr
less."
Wheeler said that he, "was not
in a position to make a statement
at this time.",
"Things have been tense and
I don't want to make a statement
that could be misinterpreted," he
said.
Mayor Harris, who declined to
comnment, said,, "I can't do any
good commenting and it's possible
that I might do some harm."
Police have not released the de-
tails, but it is reported that a
scuf'fel began /after one of the
men tore ┬░up a ticket issued by p
policeman.

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