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May 07, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-05-07

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ENDING
TODAY

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DIAL
8-6416

second front pagie

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

2 Academy Award Winners
"The Producers" at 7:15 ONLY
"The Subject Was Roses" at 9 P.M. ONLY
Thursday
"MONT EREY POP"

Wednesday, May 7, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page

1aq

Programs aid pre-med

! )

TON IGHT
BACK
ByOverwhelming Popular Demand
THE
HO.t -

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
FREE-

By TOBE LEV
Twenty-seven black students
will be working in the medical
school this summer in two spe-
cial projects.
A Summer Fellowship pro-
gram will enroll twenty blacks
who will work in Ann Arbor
r e s e a r c hlaboratories and
Compensatory Educational Pro-
gram will enroll seven students
"who wish to study medicine
but need additional education
to bring them up to academic
parity."
Both programs have been fi-
nanced by a $47,500 grant from
the Macy Foundation. The Uni-
versity has contributed an ad-
ditional $5,000 to the Summer
Fellowship Program which was
also run last year for fifteen
black students from Southern
colleges.
This year, however, there
has been a deliberate emphasis
to enroll blacks from Michigan
colleges. Eight of the twenty
students enrolled are from Mich-

igan, five from the University.
Seven of the participating
students started research Mon-
day and will work for three
months. The other 13 will arrive
next month and will remain for
two months.
Dr. James Ranck, member of
the University committee which
planned the program, says it
was originally designed for
Southern blacks becausethere
is little or no laboratory re-
search going on at Southern col-
leges.
Black students in Michigan
colleges were expected to find
research opportunities on their
own, he adds. "But most Uni-
versity students feel terrorized
by the idea of research and
don't go around looking for
their own opportunities," Ranck
explained.
"This year, says Ranck, we
feel especially responsible to
students from the University,
then to students from the state

of Michigan and then to the
nation at large."
Ranck says last year the plan-
ning committee had only one
black member and one black
consultant, however, this year
four of the ten committee men
are black.
The committee wrote to a
contact person in several col-
leges, usually the chairman of
the biology department or di-
rector, of the Opportunities
Awards Program. The contact
person was asked to recommend
qualified students or to dis-
tribute information on the pro-
gram so any interested student
could apply. About half of the
applicants were accepted, Ranck
says.
The $18,000 Compensatory
Educational Program, funded
entirely by the Macy Founda-
tion, will enroll only University
students. A special committee,
composed of black medical stu-
dents and eight' teaching fac-
ulty at the Medical School se-

blacks
lected the students by personal
interview.
Professor Andrew Zwiffler, di-
rector of the program, says "es-
sentially any black student with
less than a 2.5 average but who
wanted to work in medicine was
eligible for interview," The com-
mittee obtained the names of
eligible students from the black
medical students on the com-
mittee and through the oppor-
tunity awards office.
Fifteen blacks were invited to
come in for interview's. Eight
responded and were interviewed,
and seven of them were chosen.
Two faculty members, one
teaching a special course and
another to work with him, will
administrate the program.
Approximately 12 faculty
members from the literary col-
lege and the medical school'
worked seven months on the
development study, which es-
tablished the budget, the selec-
tion methods and the curriculum
of the compensatory program.

Sec. of Navy
vetoes Pueb.arlo.
coulrt- -martiakS
.rot Wire Service Reports
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of the Navy John H. Cha
yesterday overruled Navy officials to save Cmdr. Lloyd
Bucher and two other Pueblo officers from possible puni
ment because of North Korea's seizure of their slip,
At the s a m e time Chafee blocked official reprima:
against two senior naval officers, including Rear Adm. Fro
L. Johnson, who commanded U.S. naval forces in Kore:
Japanese waters at the time of the incident Jan. 23, 1968,
But Chafee stopped short of absolving Bucher, the Pue
skipper, or any of the other officers in connection with
loss of the intelligence gathering ship in international watt
"I make no judgment regarding the guilt or innocence
any of the officers of the of-h

For Overwhelming Popular Consumption
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-
BILL ANAVE R
"HE'S WHAT'S HAPPENING IN FOLK MUSIC."
-Michael Cooney

rap MICHIGAN

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

"B1O... EXTRAORDINARY
.: SIMPLY 'GREAT!
MAGGIE SMITH'S PERFORMANCE IS STAGGERING!"
-Vincent Canby, New York Times
ctNTuY-sox, presents
Strong B o~
S Coy
w~wi~ir rrrw~wiwnw~ wwww

the
news to day
by The Ass.,ocated Press and College Press Service

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE of South Carolina and its hospital
may have to close because of a strike against that hospital and
the Charleston County Hospital.
The president of the college, Dr. William McCord, said the school
might close because the 500-bed hospital, operating at half capacity,
will no longer be a sufficient training facility for interns.
Meanwhile, the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, head of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference which is leading demonstrations to
support hospital strikers announced a massive march in Charleston
Sunday "in dramatic witness against government oppression."
At least three Congressmen will participate in the May 11 march,
including Michigan representative John Canyers (D-Detroit), Aber-
nathy said.

.::

NORTHERN IRELAND yesterday declared an amnesty for all
"political prisoners."
The amnesty which affects 133 people was the first major de-
cision of Ulster's three-day Cabinet formed by Prime Minister James
Chichester-Clark. Some of the 133 already are in jail and others are
awaiting trial for offenses arising from the past eight months of
clashes between Protestants and Roman Catholics, The amnesty dates
back too October when civil rights rioting first broke out in London-
derry.
Chichester-Clark, elected prime-minister last Thursday, replaces
Terence O'Neill who resigned because he was unable to end feuding
over demands of the Catholic minority for voting reform and equality
in jobs and housing.
LEBANON RECEIVED commando warnings from Cairo yes-
terday to ease its restrictions on Palestinian guerrillas operating
from Lebanon.
Al Fatah, the most powerful commando group, demanded that
Lebanese officials free imprisoned guerrillas and allow others to op-
erat, from Lebanon soil unhampered.
ThedEgyptian commandos said they would negotiate With Lebanon
for freedom to operate after Beirut officials "lift the siege around
Palestine refugee camps."
The ultimatum was delivered a day after the Lebanese army'
threatened to take "military deterrent measures" against guerrillas
who had attacked Lebanese soldiers.
* * * -
A REVISED FOOD AID PROGRAM was proposed yesterday t
by President Nixon which would cost $2.5 billion a year.x

-Associated Press
A perfect fit?

Two of the three Apollo 10 astronauts, John W. Young and
Eugene A. Cernan, get their spacesuits checked in preparation
for the May 18 launch which will fly within 50,000 feet of the moon
to pave the way for the landing of two Apollo 11 astronauts in July.
GRAPE BOYCOTT:
Marches to Detrolit
to renew pr"otests

fenses alleged against them,"
the Navy secretary said.
Snam convinced, however, that
neither individual discipline, nor
the state of discipline or morale
in the Navy, nor any other in-
terest requires further legal pro-
ceedings with respect to any per-
sonnel involved in the Pueblo in-
cident."
In California Bucher said yes-
terday he is satisfied with Navy
handling of the Pueblo inquiry,
relieved that it's over, and expects
his future will depend on how he
handles his next Navy job.
Chafee disclosed yesterday that;
a court of inquiry, composed of
five admirals, had recommended a
general court-martial on five
charges for Bucher.
Generally, these charges cov-
ered alleged failure to take steps
to prevent his ship from being
overrun and failing to block the
loss of secret material to the
North Koreans.
The court, which sat for 80 days
in San Die go, Calif., also called
for a general court-martial on
three charges for Lt. Stephen R.
Harris, who was in charge of the
intelligence detachment aboard
the Pueblo. His alleged offenses
came under the heading of dere-
liction in the performance of his
duties.
The court, a sort of grand jury,
recommended a letter of admoni-
tion for Lt. Edward R, Murphy
Jr. the Pueblo's executive officer,
for alleged derelictionin perform-
ance of his duties
The"court's findings recom-
mended letters of reprimand for
Johnson, who was U.S. commander
of naval forces, Japan, but nowj
has another ,job, and Capt. Ever-
ett B. Gladding, who was director:
of the Navy security group in the:
Pacific and is now! retired.
However, Chafee said Adm.
John S. Hyland, commander in
chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet,
rejected, the court-martial re-
commendations for Bucher and
Harris, recommending instead let-
ters of reprimand.
Hyland. accepted the recom-
mendations for a letter of repri-
mand to Johnson and turned down
the reprimand for Gladd.
The letter of reprimand, which'
is entered in aknaval officer's rec-
ord, is a black mark which nor-
mally adversely affects chances
Taking a less harsh stance than
the uniformed Navy, Chafee said:
"In reviewing the court's re-
commendations with respect to
Cmdr. Bucher, Lt. Murphy, and Lt.
Harris, it is my opinion that--even
assuming that further proceedings
were had, and even going so far
as to assume that a judgment of
guilt were to be reached-they
have suffered enough, and further
punishment would not be justi-
fied."'

MORE NEWS

Campbell
Succeeds
B rea ke
Ross W., Campbell has been
sworn in as the successor to the
late Circuit Court Judge James
Breaker,
Campbell, previously a counti
probate judge, was appointed by
Gov. William Milliken to com-
plete a term ending in January,
1971. He trill face re-election i1n
November, 1970.
Campbell was recommended by
county Republican officials and by
Ypsilanti attorneys who hoped to
fill the vacancy with a man from
their area.
He was elected probate judge
April 3, 1966, in a special election
for a successor to John Conlin,
who had been elected circuit judge
the preceding November.
Ypsilanti District Judge Rodney

While we were away, everything
else kept on going, More exten~-
sive coverage of local news con-
tinues on Page 8.

I

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prepared by the United States National Student Association
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how you can do it for less .. it's the official source book for over
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up-to-date -
more detailed information on Australia and Japan
* a completely new section on Africa
** information on every important city, country, and continent
to which an American student is allowed to travel
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Please send me copy(ies) of THE STUDENT TRAVELER
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Nixon asked for new laws which would provide all poor families
with enough food stamps to buy a nutritionally balanced diet free of
cost to those families who fall into the very lowest income brackets.
No recipients of food stamps would pay more than 30 per cent
of their income for the stamps, the plan adds. Officials say some
families now spend over half theit income on food.
In addition, Nixon said the program would extend to 440 countries,
Read and V se The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Daily Llassifieds Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard ,St., Ann Arbor,
Mvichigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier. 810 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

r
p
e
F
C
f
e
c
C
F
s
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s:
i

By LORNA CHEROT
Mexican - Americans, students
and workers will participate in a
four day march from Ann Arbor
to Detroit May 7-10 to show sym-
pathy for migrant farm workers,
Michigan is the second largest em-
ployer of migrant labor - 80,000
each summer.
The march, scheduled to end in
a May 10 rally in Detroit's Ken-
nedy Square, will be led by Hijinio
Rangel, director of the Detroit
California Grape Boycott and a
former migrant worker.
Other marches to emphasize the
existence of the California boy-
cott will be' taking place in Battle
Creek, Saginaw, Flint, and Grand
Rapids.'
The rally in Kennedy Square,
set for 3:30 p.m. Saturday coin-i
cides with the arrival of. the first
shipment of California grapes to
Detroit supermarkets.
In Ann Arbor four major chain

grocery stores have been persuad-
ed not to stock California grapes,
A & P, Krogers, Wrigley, and Ves-
cio- Other local groups have en-
dorsed the boycott..
The march to Detroit will start
from~ City Hall at 10 a.m. after a
rally and will proceed along Route
17. S t a t e Senator Roger Craig,
Rangel, City Councilman Nicholas
Kazaranoff and Father Patrick
Jackson are scheduled to speak at
the rally. There also will be a rally
in Ypsilanti at the Eastern Michi-
gan University Newman Center at
7:30 p.m.
Thursday night the march will
proceed aloig Route 12 to Inkster,
where there will be another rally
at St. Clement's Church.
From there the march will con-
tinue on Friday along Route 12 to
Detroit.
On Saturday morning all march-
ing groups w i11 assemble in
Roosevelt Park for the final walk
to Kennedy Square.

Hutchinson is likely to be appoint-
ed to replace Campbell in Probate
Court. Hutchinson has run for the
office several times, and was de-
feated by Campbell in 1967 by 478
votes.
C mpbell headed the estates and
mental health division of probate
court. He has written for the state
bar journal on the role of at-
torneys in juvenile courts and on
recommended changes in the hos-
pitalization of mental patients.
For nearly three years Camp-
bell served as a referee in the
Juvenile Division of Probate Court.
He has also been a member of thie
county bar's legal aid committee.
Campbell graduated from West
Point and holds a juris doctor
degree from the University Law
School. He has also taken grad-
uate work in sociology and psy.
chology at the Institute for Con-
tinuing Legal Education.
He has practiced patent, trade-
mark, and copyright law as a spe-
cialty along with his general prac-
tice since 1960. He formerly taught
business law at Eastern Michigan
University and Cleary College.
The new circuit judge said he
hopes to "serve the people of the
county in a manier which will
carry out the high traditions and
standards that Juctge Breaky set."

3
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