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May 14, 1969 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1969-05-14

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Page Three

Wednesday, May 14, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 14, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ao- . Th r

,,

_- _

the-
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

HRC asks action
against policeman

SENATE OPPONEN TS of the Nixon administration's Safe-
guard antimissile system total 48, an Associated Press survey
showed yesterday.
Advocates of speedy installation of the limited antiballistic
missile system proposed by President Nixon now total 46 with six
senators undecided.
Gen. Robert Griffin (R-Mich) is one of the senators who have
recently come out in favor of the program.
An aide of one senator said that everything depends on what Nixon
does. If he pushes hard for passage many Republicans who oppose the
program- might change their position to support their party's leader.
* * *
AMERICAN OFFICIALS said yesterday that North Viet-
namese rocket attacks across the demilitarized zone were probably
in defiance of U.S. demands in the Paris peace talks.
This morning communist gunners fired a brief rocket barrage
against the Dort city of Da Nang and the nearby helicopter base at
Marble Mountain.
The status of the six-mile wide buffer stripe and its restoration
as a neutral zone have become central issues in the Paris peace talks.
The U.S. contended that North Vietnam agreed to stop military
activity there in exchange for an end to the bombing. North Vietnam
denied this saying the bombing halt was unconditional.
* * * '
BRITAIN AND FRANCE announced rising trade deficits for
April yesterday.
The buildup to this month's currency crisis -hurt each country's
trade and helped turn the French figure into a record.
There were no signs that the news would touch off another mone-
tary crisis in Europe. The franc barely wavered andIthe pound slumped,
but recovgred later in the day. There was no new rush to buy German
marks.
The British board of trade reported a $16.8 million deficit while
France reported a deficit of $272 million.
RACIAL RIOTING broke out in Kuala Lumpur, the capital
of Malaysia, yesterday.
Rioting broke out between Chinese and Malay moos after a deci-
sion by Malaysia's Chinese faction to shun the nation's new govern-
ment.
Police reported 100 persons were killed and other hundreds were
injured when thousands of youths surged through the streets Attack-
ing people and setting buildings ablaze.
4 i Prime Minister Tunku Abaul Rahman blamed opposition elements
for the outbreak and placed Kuala Lumpur under a state of emergency
and a 24 hour curfew.
* *
THE SENATE defeated a resolution calling on President
Nixon to delay his plan to shut down 59 Job Corps centers yes-
terday.
The Democratic sponsored resolution was defeated 52-40.
It was the first major test in the Senate of one of Nixon's policy
decisions in the domestic field.
The resolution was defeated by -the Republicans with help from

(Continued from Page 1)
the bar. The manager claimed she
called police because Chauncey
was being "a nuisance" all eve-
ning.
She said that after she in-
formed him that the bar was
closed he tried to order more beer.
The bartender, she saidinformed
Chauncey twice that the bar was
closing, but Chauncey at that time
refused to order.
It is not clear whether the po-
lice will drop their charges. City
Attorney Peter Forsythe is con-
ducting an investigation of the
incident, which he said may be
completed by today, and will rec-
ommend whether court action
should be taken against Chauncey.
The police department has re-
fused to release any information
concerning the case pending an
investigation.
Chauncey's attorney, Frederick
McDonald, yesterday said that
Chauncey has not yet decided
whether to press charges. McDon-
ald declined to discuss the inci-
dent any further.
Cowley said he did not believe
the HRC should have to press

charges against another depart-
ment of the city.
"Everyone in the city adminis-
tration knows what happened,"
Cowley said, "and the depart-
ments ought to be able to work
out a solution."
"The one who should press
charges against the police if he
wants to. is Chauncey," said Cow-
ley.
Cowley said that the HRC's in-
vestigation "corroborated by wit-
nesses" indicates that Chauncey in
no way acted disorderly and that
he "performed his assignment ex-
actly as instructed."
Rowry said there were also some
conflicting reports that Chauncey
had been disorderly at Uiiversity
Hospital.
However, Walter Paul, HRC
emergency housing coordinator,
said that he secured a signed
statement from William Bender,
public information officer of the
hospital, that Chauncey did not
in fact 'act disorderly.
The statement in fact indicated
the police officer seemed very
friendly to Chauncey at the time,
Paul said.

Hayakawa
testifies
to Congress
(Continued from Page 1)
New York, the new acting presi-
dent turned down a recommenda-
tion from the faculty senate that
classes be called off the rest of the
week so that black and and Puerto
Rican demands could be discussed
further.
A "saltine" banquet is set for to-
morrow to highlight a hunger
strike at Marietta College in Ohio
protesting the expulsion of the
student government president who
called the school's grievance proce-
dure "hogwash."
Nineteen Brooklyn college stu-
dents faced criminal charges yes-
terday in connection with fiery
disorders at the college earlier in
the month.
Twtnty-one sealed indictments
were handed up yesterday by a
grand jury investigating last
month's seizure of a Cornell Uni-
versity building by armed black
militants.

Draft by
lottery
proposed
(Continued from Page 1)
Officials said t h a t a student,
upon graduating from college
would become a sort of "artificial
19-year-older," regardless of his
age and would be vulnerable for a
year.
"-Allow graduate students to
complete, not just one term, but
the. full academic year during
which they are first orderedfor
induction."
At the same time, Nixon ordered
the National Security Council and
the Selective Service System to re-
view thoroughly the guidelines and
standards used by more than 4,000
local draft boards for deferments
and exemptions and report back
to him by next Dec. 1.
In calling for a review of guide-
lines to local boards, Nixon said
that while the autonomy of local
boards provides "valuable flexi-
bility and sensitivity," reasonable
guidelines can "help to limit geo-
graphic inequities a n d enhance
the equity of the entire system."

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Ann Arbor
' Department of Romance Languages
' a lecture in Spanish
DON DAMASO ALONSO
"El realismo literario mediadios del siglo XV.
(En las visperas dye la not cla espanola.) "
Assembly Hall 8:00 P.M.
k Rackham Bldg. May 16, 1969
* SOON *
Great Suspense
"TWISTED NERVE"
Program Information
662-6264
Please Note i
Time s- ,I .M.,3:40,/
Starring
Beryl Reid Susannah York Carolom Bre
Also Starring Rona d Fraser Patricia Medina Hugh Paddick
Cyril Delevanti Music by Gerald Fried From the Play by
Frank MarcusScreenplay by Lukas Heller
Produced and Directed by Robert' Aldrichtix

i - -- .__.__

77-

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Day Calendarj
Wednesday, May 14
Bureau of'Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 89": North CampusCommons.
8:15 a.m.
College and University Machine Rec-
ords Conference, - Data Communica-
tions in the Next Decade - South
Quadrangle, 9:00 a.m.
Ann Arbor Branch, American Asso-
ciation of University Women Lecture -
Design in Our Lives - Our Time-Em-
me Lea Bippus, senior lecturer, Tole-I
do Museum of Art, "Design for Visual
Pleasure": Rackham Tmphitheater, 7:30
p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
Department of Chemistry A.C.S. Lee- j

in the Application of NMR to the Study
of Macrorolecules, Thursday, May 15,
8:00 p.m., 1300 Chemistry.
1968..University of Michigan Biblio-
graphy: Forms for bibliographic infor-
mation for the 1968 University of
Michigan Bibliography have been mail-
ed to faculty and staff members at their
home address. Any University employee
who has publications to report for the
calendar year 1968 and who has not
received the form should call the ORA
Editorial Office, 764-4277.
Doctoral Exa'Ms
Jeffrey, Robert Sampson, Computer
and Communications Sciences, Disser-
tation: "A Neutral Subassembly Model
of Human Learning and Memory," on
Wednesday, May 14 at 9:00 a.m. in
Room 2026 Ouimet Building, Chairman:
J. H. Holland,
S Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Placement Servic~es Is Open Through-

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ture - Dr. Frank A. Bovey, Bell Tele- out The Summer, General Placement,
phone Laboratories, "Recent Progress (Continued on Page 4)

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Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Oecond
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
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RENTAL
T.V.-Stereo--
Air Conditioner
LOWEST STUDENT
RATES
FULL SERVICE
Hi Fi Studio
NO 8-7942
121 W. Washington
Downtown-across from
Old German

BRAZIL_
SUMMER STUDY IN RIO
EIGHT WEEKS JULY-AUGUST 1969
-UN IVERSITY COURSES: Brazilian History, Govt,
Literature, Anthrop, Econ. Devel, Portuguese, etc.
-FACULTY: Harvard, Columbia, M.I.T., N.Y.U.
-EXCURSIONS: Bahia, Brasilia, Sao Paulo, etc.
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-ENROLLMENT FEE includes: Air Passage, Lodgings,
Tuitioni Excursions, Workshops-$1220
WRITE INTERAMERICAN SUMMER STUDY ASSOC.
310 Madison Ave.-New York 10017
APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: MAY 25, 1969

"An unprecedented
psychedelic roller
coaster of an
experience."
-Life
"BEST VISUAL EFFECTS"

I.

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SUPER PANAVISION'O. METROCOLOR

TONIGHT

--

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Cycles sell
in Classifieds

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AIRPORT:
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Ticketsi are:available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

TV RENTALS
prmonth Nb Deposit FREE service
permot Required and delivery
Call
NEJAC TV RENTALS 662-5671
SERVING BIG 10SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

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ND SATURDAY-
SARA GREY
"She's Great!"-Beirry O'Neill

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ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
C presents
!~SeStoops toConquer"
ror
r .The Mistakes of a Night
by OLIVER GOLDSMITH
o MAY 21, 22, 23 & 24 1
8:00 P.M.
at
Lydia Mendelssohn TheatreA
Ticket Prices: $1.50-$2.50;c
c Box Office Opens Mon., May 19
10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Phone 668-6300 0
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ENDING WEDNESDAY
*What is yourmind-blowing level?
A guitar beingaped at a pop festival?
Something more substantial,like'Ravi
Shankar tearing loose with a dazling
display of musicianship?So much
Is packed into this documentary of the Monterey
op Festival of June, 1967. Plus more, more, more"
-William wolf, cue Magazine

DIAL
8-6416

ter- _- i1
_

STARTING
THURSDAY'

C4 MAI =jli

ENDING TONIGHT
Peter O'Toole Zero Mostel
"GREAT CATHERINE"

I

..."We have your daughter. You can have her back intact
if you do what we say and keep silent. We've made
no mistakes. Don't you make any. Just follow our in-
structions or..."

THURSDAY
Premiere Advance Engagement!

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
The Adventures of

Marion money
Brando

I

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- ~ x~x I I I U

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17

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