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August 19, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-08-19

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Tuesday, August 1, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, August 19, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

,,.

SThursday, August 21 I
is the last
issue of THE
DAILY for the
summer term.
The ad deadlines for this

Woodstock: Pot,

music

mud

WHITE LAKE, N.Y. (R)-With
a final strum from the last
guitar, a huge crowd quietly de-
parted yesterday from the mu-
sic, mud and marijuana of a
unique rock festival, weekend
mecca for an estimated 400,000
people.
"This generation was brought
together and showed it was
beautiful," said Michael Lang, a
promoter of the festival, who
along with three associates in
the venture estimated a finan-
cial loss that might approach
$2 million.
"The kids were wonderful,
honest, sincere, good kids-.
and they forced me to open my
eyes," decla red their host, Max
Yasgur, a dairy tarmer I
think America has to take no-
tice."
It was across his 600-acre
farm that the multitude slogged
and grooved through three days
of intermittent rain to the music
of such favorites as Joan Baez,
Janis Joplin, the Jefferson Air-
plane, Sly and the Family Stone
and the Credence Clearwater
Revival.
Lou Yank, head of the consta-
bularly in nearby Monticello,
U OWN.,

paper are

as follows.

said: "Nothwithstanding their
personality, their dress and their
ideas, they were and are the
most courteous, considerate and
well-behaved group of kids I
have ever been in contact with
during my 24 years of police
work.
Two deaths were reported.
One apparently was from an
overdose of heroin, and one
teenage boy was run over by a
tractor. Two babies were born.
Close to 5,000 people, most of
them in the mid and late teens,
were treated for injuries, illness
and dope reaction. There were
about 80 arrests on the more
serious drugs charges. But for
the most part marijuana smok-
ers were left alone to do their
thing.
"There was so much grass
being smoked last night that
you could get stoned just sitting
there breathing," said the col-
lege student.
Sgt. John Krom, at State Po-
lice headquarters in Middletown,
said: "We're just happy they're
leaving. They can take their
narcotics with them. We've had
it."
More than 100,000 bought tick-
ets in advance to what was
billed as the Woodstock Music
and Art Fair, an Aquarian Ex-
position. When four times that
number showed up, shortages of
food, water and sanitary facili-
ties quickly develop amid im-

provised camp sites set up in
seas of mud.
Lang, 24, said it cost $50,000
to rent the Yasgur farm. There
were payments to the musicians,
plus an estimated $600,000 in
emergency expenses. Creditors
were demanding cash or certi-
fied checks from Woodstock
Ventures, Inc., with which Long
and the other organizers are
associated.
Lang said it was impossible to
collect admissions from more
than half the audienece because
of the crowd's size.
He said receipts totaled about
$1.3 million, with expenses of at
least $2.4 million, possibly much
more. He offered no word on
how they hoped to make up the
deficit.
Despite the impact of the
youth invasion on this Catskill
mountain community of 3,000,
farmer Yasgur was enthusiastic.
A graying, 6-footer of 50 who
describes himself as a conserva-
tive Republican, he declared:,
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Official publication of the Univer-
sity o Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN o r n to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
a pm. of the day preceding publi-
ction and by 2 p.m., Friday for

DISPLAY-3 P.M. Tuesday, Aug. 19
(LASSIIED-3 P.M. Tuesday, Aug. 19

11

: = 1

W I

JUMBO'

I~

Fp

RADICAL FILM SERIES

M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger of 14 lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pickles and ketchup.
M u S TIR
I O LING ®PEEDY @ERVICE
West of Arborland

I

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
AGI F-PROP
105
A film by Norman Fruchter and John Douglas
Distributed by NEWSREEL
-Draft Resistance organizing in Boston
-A Boston organizer's trip to North Vietnam
-A G.1. coffee house in Texas
-Newsreel's appearance on Channel 13 in N.Y.
-Production of THE RAT'S special issue in Chicago
-Chicago during the Democratic Convention-the
planning and carrying out of five days of protest
Each section focuses on on organizer central to each project-
the attempt is to define the nature of commitment to "the Move-
ment" against a backdrop of last summer's activity.

"In the beginning, when I re-
ceived threats from some neigh-
bors, that they'd burn my place
down, or boycott my milk; I
stopped and thought, 'If they're
right and I'm wrong, let them
stop me legally.
"The kids were wonderful,
honest, sincere, good kids who
said, 'Here we are. This is what
we are. This is the way we dress.
These are our morals.'
"There wasn't one incident
the whole time. The kids were
polite, shared everything with
everyone, and they forced me to
open my eyes. I think America
has to take notice. These are the
future voters. This is the future
population.
"If they're using drugs, it's
because they have emotioal
problems, and that's our fault,
the fault of me and my genera-
tion. We made them this way
and we've got to try and help
them now and prevent younger
ones from taking drugs."
Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Studen~t organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270
Day Calendar
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19
Degree Recital - Linda Jaffarian, pi-
ano: School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00
p.m.t
Opera - The Merry wifes of Wind-
sor by Otto Nicolai, Josef Blatt, con-
ductor; Ralph Herbert, stage director:
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, 8:00 p.m.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Current Positions Received by Gen-
eral Division please call 764-7460 for
further information:
U of Wisconsin Medical Center -
Biol., Chem., Biochem., Med tech, de-
grees for work In Preventative med.,
onocology, path, Obs., Med. Genetics,
Anatory, Plant Path, Food S, Pharm-
acol.
Management Consultants - Chief
Engineer, BSME, new product design
and exper in directing engrs, s h e e t
metal fabrication exper.
Mobil Oil Corp, Ninle, nl. - Process
Engr,.ChE, 'bper pref. Mechan engr.
Marketing Rep, CE pref.
Ford Motor Company, Utica, Mich. -
Engineers, any area, Indust. Relations
Personnel, Bus. Ad., Psych, Indust Rel.
degree. Finance, Bus. Ad.
City of Chicago - Air Pollution Con-
trol personnel, research in meteorology,
bl., math, or systems exper, MS or
PhD pref. and several years exper.
Local Office - Placement Assistant,
some office exper. helpful, no degree
needed. Arranges visits to campus of
recruiters, and other duties.
The Michigan Daiy, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard'- St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published dailyTues-
day through Sunday morning University
year. Subscription rates: $9 by carrier,
$10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $300 by
mail.
1 I
-. 1'.ecttont Lne )loe'prn GaOlrrtg
DIAL 5-6290
TODAY at 1:30 and 8 P.M.

the
n e ws oday
by, Tblx Assochirfd Pressand C oW t Prcs & ri c

THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION has ordered Mississippi
to delay spending federal funds for the schooling of disadvantaged
children, charging racial discrimination in the state program.
Federal officials say that Mississippi's per-pupil expenditures
are higher for white children than for black students. The funding
delay is the government's first attempt to enforce regulations re-
quiring equal educational opportunity for whites and blacks. Previous
federal efforts have concentrated on racial desegregation.
The order to halt aid funds exempts "essential" health, welfare
and teaching programs, which claim more than half of the state's
$32.1 million in federal aid for disadvantaged children.
* * *
A FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION spokesman has
suggested that air traffic control systems be automated to increase
the safety of the nation's jammed airways and overcrowded air-
ports.
The plan was announced before yesterday's release of a report
by Republican congressmen which predicted an increase in air cata-
strophes due to the heavy volume of air traffic.
The FAA official said that if Congress is not willing to appropriate
funds for automation, the FAA, which has felt increasing pressure
from air traffic controllers protesting stressful work loads, will have
to impose further restrictions on landings and takeoffs at major air-
ports.
* * *
U.S. ARMY OFFICIALS in South Vietnam ended the close
confinement of eight Special Forces soldiers accused of mur-
dering a suspected Vietnamese double-agent.
The Army said their confinement was "no longer ne'cessary,"
while a lawyer for three of the men said charges against all the ac-
cused, including the former commander of all Special Forces in Viet-
nam, may be dropped by tomorrow. Military spokesmen have released
no word of the results of a pre-court martial investigation of the
case.
* * *
THE U.N. COMMAND has asked North Korea for a meeting
of the Korean Armistice Commission in Panmunjom, apparently
to discuss the downing of a U.S. helicopter over the North on Sun-
day.
North Korea acknowledged shooting down the aircraft, but gave
no information on the survival of the three-man crew. The Remember
the Pueblo Committee has announced that it learned from North Ko-
rean contacts that all three are alive.
The U.N. command said that continuiig investigations show that
the helicopter entered North Korean air-space accidentally.
HUMAN RELATIONS COUNCILS should be established at
military bases to promote racial harmony among servicemen, the
Pentagon's civil rights head recommended yesterday.
The acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for civil rights
has drawn up a detailed report of racial conflicts at U.S. bases at
home and in South Vietnam, including Camp Lejeune, N.C., *here
one man was recently killed in a racial clash.
The report, which notes the absence of racial conflict among
soldiers in combat, suggests that 285 local councils be established to
deal with on-base racial problems.
FUNERAL SERVICES were held yesterday in Cape Town,
South Africa for Dr. Philip Blaiberg, who died Sunday after sur-
viving 19% months with a transplante# heart.
Dr. Christian Barnard, who performed the world's second heart
transplant on Blaiberg, indicated that autopsy results which have not
yet been released would show Biaiberg died of an unstoppable immu-
nological rejection of the alien heart tissue.
PENTAGON BUDGET OPPONENTS in the Senate are lire-
paring amendments to the $20 billion current military procure-
ment authorization bill which would block $50 billion in long-
range expenditures on four items.
Current development funds for the C5-A transport plane, the
Advanced Manned Strategic .Aircraft, the F14-A replacement for the
Navy's TFX-F111B fighter, and a nuclear attack carrier would be
eliminated or withheld by measures presented to Congress after its
summer recess by military critics.
Additionally, another pending amendment would reduce U.S. troop
strength by the number of servicemen withdrawn from Vietnam. Sen.
John Stennis (D-Miss) .has indicated that reducing U.S. forces from
a total of 3.5 million to 2.5 million could save $10 billion yearly.
A PEACE COMMITTEE set u by North Ireland Prime, Min-
ister James Chichester-Clark last night called- for the use of
more British troops to cool fighting between Roman Catholics
and Protestants.
The British commander said his troop strength would rise to
6,000 by Thursday, but added that he was uncertain the good rela-
tions between his men and the populace would continue.
Quiet prevailed in Befast as six victims of the religious strife
were buried and 22 men received jail sentences for participating in
earlier fighting. But in Dublin, the outlawed Irish Republican Army
began recruitment of volunteers to aid the Catholic minority in the
North.
Chichester-Clark is scheduled to meet today with British Prime
Minister Harold Wilson to discuss additional peace-keeping meas-
ures. Britain, which has a veto in the UN Security Council, has op-
posed the Irish Republic's call for a UN peace force in Ulster.

Program Information 662-6264
Shows at 1,13,5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 10 Min. Later
What made you leave
him, Cathy...
was it the way
he made love,
or why?

Wednesday, Aug. 20 7-8-9-10-1 1 p.m.
Admission 50c
CANTERBURY HOUSE 330-Maynard

- .

..dM'"'" """

/010

*UNIVERSITY *
MUSICAL SOCIEY

"SIT DOWN AND ENJOY YOURSELF!
Tom Courtenay turns up as Otley himself, who exists
on the fringes of London's younger, swinging set!"
-Archer Winsten. New York Post
"OTLEY IS FULL OF LAUGHTER!
A rollicking adventure for Tom Courtenay
and fun for the entire audience!"
-Frances Taylor. Long Island Press
CARL FOREMAN P uw AE
TOM COURTENAY
ROMYSQHNEIDER
~i D CECWICURTISi'RDDUCTIOlI
.ALAN BADEI-wVwER 4tEONMDROSmTERsAMSfA
Eaewhi t wCARLt FOREMAN- ft baBRUCE COIN CURTIS- Wwuj, CLEME~NT
tU1At, A aIS c ecsw-o
"OTLEY starts tomorrow
SFIFTH FORUM 761-9700

®A.M.P.A,.S.

BEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR!
"To Miss It Is To
Throw Away
Ecstasy!"
-Drew Bogema
Mich. Dail

NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES
A MARK ROBSON PRODUCTION
' 0;%VYiS6dNi
gmt ~ Technicolor" a

WINNER 6
ACADEMYAWARDS!
Today Mat. $1.75, Eve. $2.00

I

I

ends
today

"La Prisonnaire"

7:00
9:00

Try Daily Classifieds

I

I

DIAL 8-6416
TWIN PROGRAM
Odd an
Sfirst.

NOW
0OF

REGULAR TAG PRICE OF ALL
USED
PHOTO AND SOUND EQUIPMENT

The Mirisch Production Company
Presents
thefirst
-time"
COLOR by Deluxe United Artists
AND
TH UlRlSCti CORPORAIONpresents
A JOHN HUSTON- WAITER MIRISCH

11lt11Vmus1icZ'.morn1 mannoro ...,. we~U., tJ4U. xO 1111

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