100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 22, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Third World Liberation
RADICAL CAUCUS & SGC EDUCATION MEETING
3529 SAB-8 P.M.
--Tonight-
ALL WELCOME!
HELD OVER-2nd Big Week

second front page

im4c

ltkr4i~an

Datitn-

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, July 22, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Private donations aid

Makes
'Killing of
sister ori6'
look like
a warm up."
-Salmaggi, N.Y. Daily Column

i
Faced with rising costs and
an increasing deficit, the Uni-
versity Musical Society last
winter was forced to turn to
private donations in order to
stay alive.
UMS is an independent non-
profit organization and receives
no subsidy from the University,
although President Robben
Fleming and other University
administrators sit on its board
of directors.
An audit made public at Fri-
day's Regents meeting showed
that the UMS operating deficit
had been reduced to $9,336 as of
May 31, although a deficit of
as much as $50,000 had been
predicted. It was this predic-
tion which prompted the UMS
fund-raising drive.

That drive has already raised
$22,914 in a six-month period
from over 300 donors, and UMS
Director Gale Rector reported
to the Regents that with the
continued assistance of these
and other donors UMS will be
able to maintain its traditional
offerings of concerts and musi-
cal performances.
UMS was also helped by an
unexpected increase in ticket
sales, which were up by $22,122,
The Regents received the
audit and Rector's report with-
out comment, and the gift cam-
paign will be continued. Rector
has\often emphasized that ma-
jor musical organizations- in-
cluding large symphony orches-
tras and similar grotps-are be-
coming more and more subject

to financial problems because
musicians are demanding more
pay while ticket prices cannot
be raised to cover increasing
costs.
Rector originally brought the
UMS plight before the Regents
in October, 1968. At that time a
University subsidy was consid-
ered one possible solution to the
problem, but the fund-raising
drive was instead decided on.
His initial report was prompt-
ed by an audit over a year ago
which showed that the UMS
general fund had been reduced
by $115,000. However, some of
this deficit was due to the
sesquicentennial music presen-
tations of 1967, an unusual ex-
penditure for the society.
As a result of the financial

UMS
crisis. UMS has had to cut back
on the number of concerts of-
fered, eliminating the Chamber
Arts series and condensing some
other series.
However, with the success of
the UMS Gift program, it looks
as though no more serious cut-
backs will be necessary, and
UMS will be holding its own-
at least for some time to come.
In his latest report, Rector
said he expected continued sup-
port from donors and increased
concern and assistance from
others, including local busi-
nesses. He added that UMS
would continue to expect sym-
pathetic concern and coopera-
tion from the Regents.

L 4
LUNA 15 HAS LANDED on the moon and has finished its work,
the Soviet Union announced last night.
The announcement ended speculation that the Soviet controllers
would try to bring a sample of moon rock down to earth.
A statement from the official Tass said Luna 15's work was fin-
ished after there were 86 communications sessions to check the work
of "new systems of the automatic station Luna 15."
The statement added that Luna 15 made 52 revolutions around
the moon and was able to land in various areas of the lunar surface
through changing "the seleconcentric orbit."

the
news to day
by The Associated Prss and College Pres Service

a

E

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
"rvd r ".+."-r..+

Apollo 11 crew starts
return trip to Earth

Woman part II

distibutd by a-Muqa,.R~
Coor by PMovi.tab

"X'" persons under 18 not admitted

6:30, 8:00, 9:30
FIFTH FORUM THEATRE

761-9700

i

I

Official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f or n to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
DIAL 5-6290
ENDING THURSDAY
MGM presents
OmarShari
Catheine kDeneuv
James Mason
in Terence Young's
Mayerling -
Ji mRobertson-Justice
Genevieve Page
And AsThe Emrs ~~t
Ava Gardner
PM11AVSKN N'? XOt.NOLi

t *t
PRESENTS
ALEXIS
Internationally Renowned Pianist
In Rackham Auditorium
Wed., July 23-8:30
(Third Concert in the Summer SeriesQ
PROGRAM

TUESDAY, JULY 22
Trumpet Student Recital - School of
Music Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previews - Black History - Lost,
Stolen, or Strayed; "I Have a Dream ..."
Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Multi-
purpose.Room, Undergraduate Library,
3:00 p.m.
University Players ._ Michigan Rep-
ertiry 69 - Hogan's Goat by William
Alfred: Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
The Baroque Trio - Nelson Hauen-
stein, flute; Florian Mueller, oboe;
Lawrence Hurst, double bass and
Charles Fisher, harpsichord: Rackham
Lecture Hall, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Botany Seminar:Dr. Dietrich v g n
Wettstein, University of Copenhagen
will speak on "The Molecular Basis of
Chromosome Paring and Crossing-over
in an Ascomycete," on wednesday, July
23, 1969 at 4:15 p.m., 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg.
Doctoral Exams
George Lee Miller, Education, Disser-
tation: "Relationships Between Teach-
er Flexibility and Teacher Reinforce-
ment on the Attitudes and Internality-
Externality of Students." on Tuesday,
July 22, at 1:30 p.m. in 4209 U.H.S.,
Chairman: N. A. Flanders.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Attention August Graduates: Place-
ment Services offers job hunting as-
sistance for those seeking positions in
all areas. Registration establishes a set
of credentials. Information, literature,
directories, counseling, and current
opening lists. Hours 8:30-12 and 1:30-
4:30, Monday - Friday, 3200, S.A.B.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
Bucyrus-Erie Company, South Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin seeks architectural
student for summer work, want some-
one available now, or after e n d of
spring-% term in late June. Excellent
salary. Further details at S.P.S., come
to 212 SAB.-
Jabs Abroad, permanent job offer in
N.Y. and Brussels for bilingual stu-
dent, girl preferred. Details at Summer
Placement Service.

(Continued from Page 1)
Eagle from Columbia and head-
ed for the moon.
A series of engine burns then
lowered Eagle to the lunar sur-
face at 4:18 p.m. "Houston,
Tranquility Base here," Arm-
strong radioed. "The Eagle has
landed." Immediately the as-
tronauts began testing Eagle's
systems in case an emergency
take-off would have been nec-
essary. When all appeared well,
they reported details of the
landing.
"The auto-targeting was taking
us right- into a football field-
sized crater with a large number
of big boulders," said Arm-
strong. "It required flying man-
ually over the rock field to find
a reasonably good area (to
land)."
'. About 6 p.mn., after prom
ing a simulated count-down and
eating, the astronauts request-
ed permission, quickly granted,
from Mission Control to begin
their moon-walk five hours ear-
ly,
Finally, after several minor
delays, Armstrong and Aldrin
began depressurizing the cabin
about 10:25 p.m. Soon after,
Armstrong went through Eagle's
hatch and began climbing down
the ladder.
Reaching the last rung, Arm-
str'ong jumped to the footpad of
one of Eagle's legs. Hesitantly
he touched the powdery gray
lunar soil at 10:56 p.m.
"I'm going to step off the
LM now," Armstrong said.
"That's one small step for man,
one giant leap for mankind."
Twenty minutes later Aldrin
came outside. After familiarizing
himself with the new conditions,
Aldrin joined Armstrong in set-
ting up an American flag, un-
veiling a plaque, and receiving

Day

Calendar

®

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue

J.S. Bach

Symphonic Etudes.............. . Schumann
Tombeau de Couperin . .Ravel
Three Preludes Rachmaninoff
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$2.00
at
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Hours: 9:00 to 4:30, Mon. thru Fri.; Sat. 9:00 to 12:00
(Also 1% hours before performance at Rackham Auditorium)

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket."
--Kathleen Farrel
(1943.1968)
"Safety belts? They
just make me nervous.
Besides; they wrinkle
your clothes."
--Louis Claypool
(1931-1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things ?"
-Gor on Fenton
(1921.1968)
What's your excse?

I

a telephone call from President
Nixon.
Running a half-hour behind
schedule, the astronauts had to
cut short further rock gathering.
At 12:30 a.m. yesterday, Al-
drin re-entered Eagle. Forty-six
minutes later, Armstrong left
the surface, ending America's
first moon-walk.
LSA student
disciplined
(Continued from Page 1)
fronted another man sitting in an
aisle seat, and said something in
a loud voice about wanting him to
report for military induction."
Galler says, "My first thought
was that this student was allowing
himself to be overwhelmed by some
presumed outside authority, and I
tried to protect him."
But the professor says he real-
ized later it was a hoax.
Ager rules on
rent strike
(Continued from Page 1)
motion to dismiss the entire case
indicates the suit will be brought
to trial, scheduled to begin Aug. 21.
At the same time a counter-con-
conspiracy suit filed May 27 by the
Tenants Union against the seven
landlords apparently will be heard.
The counter suit charges the land-
lords have violated leases and
anti-trust statutes and asks over
$1,000,000 in damages.
Ager also denied a motion from
the Tenants Union to include Stu-
dent Government Council as a co-
defendant. "The court is of the
opinion that the Student Govern-
ment of the University has shown
no right to intervene . . .," Ager
said.
CtAT
on a,
HOT
roof

SENATOR EDWARD KENNEDY was charged yesterday with
leaving the scene of a fatal accident.
The action stems from a weekend auto accident in which a young
woman was drowned.
The mishap occurred between 11 p.m. Friday and 1 a.m. Saturday
as Kennedy was driving Mary J Kopechne, 28, of Washington, to a
landing to catch the ferry back to Martha's Vineyard, a resort ih
Massachussetts.
The car skidded off a narrow bridge and landed bottom up in
eight feet of water. Kennedy escaped with what a physician said was
a mild concussion.
In a police statement, the senator said he was left dazed by the
accident. He said he tried repeatedly to rescue Miss Kopechne, but
was unable to find her.
Kennedy went to the police 10 hours after the accident.
TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS to mainland China will be eased,
the Nixon administration announced yesterday.
The new policy also will allow Americans traveling or living
abroad to buy goods of Communist Chinese origin.
Under the ruling, six categories of U.S. citizens will have auto-
matic permission to use their passports to travel to mainland China.
This includes members of Congress, journalists, professional teachers,
scholars with post-graduate degrees and students presently in col-
lege, scientists and physicians and representatives of the American
Red Cross.
Most members of these groups have been able for some time to
obtain authorization for such travel, but permission was granted on
a case-by-case basis.
Officials estimated the new trade rule could put millions of dol-
lars a year into Communist Chinese hands. The United States has
had a total embargo on trade since it broke diplomatic relations with
mainland China 20 years ago.
THE REV. A.D. WILLIAMS KING, younger brother of the
late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was found dead yesterday in the
swimming pool of his home in Atlanta, Ga.
An associate said King apparently drowned and Atlanta police
authorities said there is no evidence of injury or foul play. However,
authorities say they cannot determine the cause of death until all
lab reports are in.
* * *
THE HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE yesterday
voted into its tax reform package a slash of 7.5 percentage points
in the oil and gas depletion allowance for petroleum producers.
The scaling down of the allowance,'if approved by Congress,
would mean.$600 million more taxes annually from the various min-
ing industries - mainly the petroleum industry.
Although earlier committee decisions on tax reform have been
described as tentative, sources say this latest one, passed by an 18-7
vote, is "pretty firm."
GROUND AND AIR BATTLES raged along the Suez Canal
Sunday in the Middle East's fiercest fighting since the 1967 Arab-
Israeli Wat.
The action began when Israeli commandos attacked Green Island,
an Egyption fortress in the Gulf of Suez, before dawn. Israeli Jets
followed up 12 hours later, hitting Egyptian positions across the canal
for the first time since the war.
Egyptian planes then made a series of raids on Israeli targets in
the occupied Sinai desert.
U.N. observers pleaded twice for the cease-fire, but the fighting
continued for more than six hours.

I"LET IT SUFFICE TO
SAY THAT -IlS A
MASTERPIECE.".yBOY

- * Advertising contributed
/for the public good.

II

. NN

"THE MOST
INTERESTING FILM
SO FAR THIS YEAR:.
-VOGUE

continued for more than six hours.

emu summer theater

.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS'
Micigan Reptertory6 9 Is a lii!.
MU(H ADO ABOUT NOTHING
"a whacking good good christening"
"skill and wit",
a thundering start"-ANN ARBOR NEWS
"abundant laughter"
gaudy vitality"
"highly entertaining"-M ICHIGAN DAILY
HOGAN'S GOAT
"builds in intensity. . . to a shattering climax"
"passion and sensitivity"
"powerful and gripping work"-ANN ARBOR NEWS
"confident and controlled"
"the staging was particularly rich"
"this repertory company has distinguished itself"-M ICHIGAN DAILY
DOCTOR'S DILEMMA
"a thorough delight"
"smooth and deft"
"a virtual textbook of effective technique"-ANN ARBOR NEWS
"a puzzling and therefore interesting play"
"a solid evening of entertainment"
"an important kind of complex experience"-MICHIGAN DAILY
ABOUT THE ACTORS
"enthusiastic versatility ... consistently solid acting"-DAILY
"emphasis on ensemble playing has paid off royally"-NEWS
ABOUT THE COSTUMES

.I:
.:ixxr

WINNER
"BEST FILM"
CANNES

"IF YOU'RE YOUNG,
* YOU'LL REALLY DIG
-COSMOPOLTAN

Thursday
Friday
Saturday,
July 24-26
8:00 pm.

I

GENERAL ADMISSION: $1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
Box Office Open: Week days 12:45-4:30 p.m.
AIR-CONDITIONED DANIEL L. QUIRK AUDITORIUM

BEST PICTURE,
OF THE YEAR!
WINNER 6 ACADEMY AWARDS!
tI OLUIRIA PICTURES Pangs 1er R(AULUS PRMOUCTK)N Il
LIONELBART'S
BOHNWOOL ..CAROL REED
gm PANAVISor TEC0*Io0r Q

Read and Use
Daily Class ffieds

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. S'ubscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.'

I

I

NATIONAL GENERAL, CORPORATION UNXESENHARS E
FOX ESTER THEA RES~VEI
FOR VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RMD-769-1300 CE

RY LAST DAY
1:30-3:25-5:15-
7:00-9:00

I

* STARTS TOMORROW *
HILARITY SHIFTS INTO HIGH GEAR..
11.1
KE s A~lAs o~
lacr/M, suIr sAcMUl~ us

JUMBOY

I

F

STARTING
FRIDAY

MICHIGAN
oly

M-M-m-m-m, yummiet
A giant hamburger of / lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
oickles and ketchup,.
SMILING PEEDYERVICE
West of Arborland

TWICE
DAILY

I

Program Information 662-6264

SHOWS AT:
Sunday-Thursday
1:1 5-3:45-6:1 5-8:50
Friday & Saturday
12:30-1 :35-4:45
6:55-9:05

I

TV I THOMPSON'S
-. . ~PIZZA

i

I

LIri -n ^iVi UD Qv nWnl t AnU rVIkA A klII I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan