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July 11, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2nd HIT
IEU2 WEEK!

seconid fronit page

futr440Ptgan

Daiti

NWSES PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0551

Now
DIAL 8-6416

Friday, July11, 1969

-NL

LET IT SUFFICE TO
SAY THAT ILIS A
MASTERPIECE." PLo VO
" THE MOST
INTERESTING FILM
SO FAR THIS YEAR::.
-VOGUE

Ann Arbor, Michigan

"IF YOU'RE YOUNG,
YOU'LL REALLY DIG
-CosOPOLITAN
.which side will yu he on?

I

Page Three

Trial set
for band
leader,
Terry W. Tate, 26, leader of the
Tate Blues Band of Ann Arbor
was bound over to Circuit Court
yesterday on an indecent exposure
charge.
Tate, who police say - took his
"American flag" suit off while
performing at the June 29 rock
concert in West Park, was ordered
by Ypsilanti District Court Judge
Henry D. Arkison to appear in
Circuit Court Aug. 8.
Ann Arbor Police Capt. Walter
V. Hawkins, called to the stand by
Assistant Prosecutor Thomas F.
Shea, testified that Tate was
wearing a red, white and blue suit
with a field of stars on the seat of
the pants. Hawkins said the 'suit
resembled an American flag.
The captain said he saw Tate
take offA the trousers of his suit
and remove h i s shirt. Hawkins
said Tate then began "jumping up
and down" in front of t h e au-
dience.
Della Boice, a witness for the
defense, testified that Tate's suit
had been sown together the night
before the concert and t h a t it
"just came apart."
Under cross examination from
Shea, Miss Boice said Tate threw
his clothes and boots into the au-
dience. She also testified that oth-
er clothing was brought to him
and that helput it on.
In addition to calling Capt.
Hawkins andhDet. Sgt. Norman
Olmstead to the stand, Shea in-
troduced eight copies of pictures
taken at the, concert as evidence
against Tate.
Judge Arkison ordered Tate's'
$5,000 surety bond to be contin-
ued.
Tate currently is in t h e first
year of a five year probation giv-
en him in Circuit on a conviction
for felonious assault. He was con-
victed 1 a st year of firing a .22
caliber pistol into the side of an
unmarked Ann Arbor police car.'

-Associated Press

Walk on the wild side?

Astronaut Neil Armstrong will look like this when he takes his first step on the moon July 21. The

drawing from Grumman Aerospace Corp. depicts the astronaut just
der from the lunar module. Earth is in the background.
Council tightens
ark restrictions

(Continued from Page 1)
a 11 o w electronically amplified
music).
"They do not appreciate having
Ann Arbor be opened up and
bared to the specter of hard or
acid rock."
However, Councilman L e r o y
Cappeart (D-Fifth Ward) said the
"inherent" arguments were all,
"verbal garbage."
"Tell me, what is inherent in

football games that brings 75,000
people to Ann Arbor from outside
the city," he asked. "I guarantee
that if 500 policemen went to the
stadium there would be a mini-
mum of 5,000 arrests."
"These regulations are reason-
able," said Councilman Nicholas
Kazarinoff (D-Third Ward). "We
do not have the constitutional
right to forbid the performance of
a major art form in the city
parks."
Councilman Roy Weber (R-
Fourth Ward) claimed that the
White Panthers had forfeited the
right to sponsor future concerts
because of alleged law violations.
However Harris countered that the
regulations do not preclude grant-
ing of permits to White Panthers
and that their representative will
be in the citizens group.

KW IK

N KLEEN

after he has descended the lad-
Mrder
wea on
(Continued from Page 1)
Krasny said yesterday only
bullets from the Phillips murder
have been found. These matched
the bore marks on the submerged
gun, but Krasny emphasized po-
lice do not have bullets from any
other murders recently, contrary
to earlier reports crediting police
with finding bullets in the murder
of Alice Kalom.
Prosecutor Delhey explained
that the July 25 court date is a
brief Circuit Court arraignment,
similar to the District court pro-
cedure. Delhey speculated the
actual trial could possibly be de-
layed as long as the first or mid-
dle of next year.
Delhey based his time estimate
partially on the details that must
be taken care of before the trial
can begin and also on the busy
Circuit Court docket.
After the arraignment July 25,
a pre-trial summary must be set.
The summary is held to allow
the defense and the prosecution to
decide what matters' must be
cleared up before the actual trial
can begin.
Defense Attorney Ralph Keyes
said last night, "It is really too
early to make a statement about
the plans of the defense at this
time." Keyes explained the case
is "in a limbo" between District
and Circuit Courts now, and noQ

theI
news today
by The Associated Press and Co/:e Press Service
PRESIDENT NIXON'S voting rights bill was ignored by a
House judiciary subcommittee yesterday.
Instead the committee overwhelmingly approved a five-year ex-
tension of the present law.
Nixon's bill would extend the ban on literacy to all states and
eliminate state residency requirements for voting in presidential elec-
tions.
Chairman Emanuel Celler, (D-NY). said he thought the full
judiciary Committee will take an equally strong stand for extension
of the 1965 Voting Rights Act next week and that the House will ap-
prove it.
Celler felt that a straight extension of. the 1965 bill would be
harder to get through the Senate, but he discounted the possibility of
filibuster by the opponents of the act.
Nixon's proposal to replace the existing act, which affects only
seven southern states, was not offered at the subcommittee meeting.
Civil rights leaders feel the bill would weaken black voter protection
in the south.
UNITED STEEL WORKERS stopped work at the two main
plants of the International Nickel Co. of Canada (INCO), Ltd.
yesterday, freezing the flow of the world's biggest nickel producer.
More than 17,000 workers stayed out at the Sudbury and Port Col-
borne Inco plants as bargaining for a new three-year contract and
higher wages went on in a Toronto hotel.
One announcement from the bargaining chamber said Inco had
upped its early wage offer to an 87-cent an hour increase over a three
year period. But the union was reported holding out for a $1.50 boost.
Although workers refused to call the work stoppage a strike, pick-
et lines were set up around the plants.
A prolonged work stoppage could paralyze output of steel pro-
ducts in Canada, the United States, Japan and Western Europe, of-
ficials say. Inco supplies 40 per cent of the world's nickel.
* *
ANDREI GROMYKO, Soviet Foreign Minister, yesterday made
an appeal for "friendly relations" with the United States, and
denounced Communist China for its hostility toward Russia and
her Communist allies.
The foreign policy statement, delivered at a Soviet parliament
meeting, underscored the worsening of Soviet-Chinese relations. Gro-
myko said "Even our most rabid enemies have never used such unwor-
thy methods on such a scale as the Chinese leaders."
Gromyko said the Soviet Union favors wide-ranging negotiations
with the Nixon administration. Explaining that Nixon's statements
for a well-prepared summit meeting have not gone unnoticed in the
Soviet Union, Gromyko said "We are developing good relations with
the United States and we want these relations to be frientdly."
Gromyko denounced the war in Vietnam in milder tones than
usual, and explained that the sooner the United States recognizes the
need for ending the war and withdrawing all American troops, the
better-"the better also for the United States,"
FRENCH PRESIDENT GEORGES POMPIDOU, in a news
conference yesterday, suggested France might ease its embargo
on arms shipments to Israel.
Informed sources believe this means resumption of weapons de-
liveries to Israel should begin within a few months.
Pompidou said France might be led to make its embargo more
flexible, restoring a pattern where spare parts, some defensive arms
and weaponsrwith "a small offensive capacity" could be sold and
shipped to Israel.
Pompidou, however, did not raise the possibility of a complete
end to the embargo, particularly the unblocking of delivery of air-
craft.
* *
PRESIDENT NIXON unveiled a broad health program yes-
terday aimed at holding down soaring medical costs while pro-
viding effective medical care to all Americans.
"We face a massive crisis," the President said. If something ur-
gent is not done, there would be a breakdown of medical services in
three years, he predicted. His report blamed "crippling inflation in
medical costs" onthe previous administration.
Main points of the president's plan include the elimination of
allowance to hospitals and nursing homes for unidentified costs and
new regulations curbing medical fees. There will be an expansion of
programs like review of drug utilization, pricing effectiveness and
safety.
The program, however, contained little that was new or unex-
pected. Instead, it appeared to be more of a gathering of programs
and policies that Secretary of Welfare Robert Finch or his aides have
discussed for weeks.'
A BRITISH DRAFT TREATY to outlaw germ warfare was
submitted yesterday to the 19-nation disarmament conference.
The draft, presented by Minister of State Fred Mulley, calls for
a ban on manufacture, use or stockpiling of 'any kind of biological
agent.
There was, no immediate reaction to the proposal but last week

President Nixon indicated the United States is "prepared to examine
carefully, together with other delegations, any approaches that offer
the prospect of reliable arms control in this field."
Nixon's message came after a United Nations report warned that
use of biological and chemical weapons could "open the doors to hor-

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motions, briefs, or other action
can take place until the case is
oficially on file in Circuit Court
after the July 25 arraignment.
.4

U
CL
h0
S
a'

PLAYBOY ran ten
well-stacked pages on this film!

a

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"A sort of 'What's New Pussycat?' brought up to
today's level! Filmed in the new style...slick
cinema...bright wit...satiric barbs!"
-Judith Crist. N.Y. Magazine

GINIMA LUILD'
Friday and Saturday
Mutiny on the Bounty
dir. FRANK LLOYD (1935)

rors beyond man's control."

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CHARLES LAUGHTON

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