100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 03, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 3, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, July 3, 1969

{ 1 S .!.; . ..

I

C'l U"3Trw-i ' rTrV "Tlh W 0l ' ANYMt1

The Texas Wedge

MAJOR LEAGUE STANDINGS
J:XiT¢ieia"-: itx}::: .::Si . *:-: : : : .;:.: .: u : .p ":{. +p . . . . . . :;..
TreshMcLain pace Tiger victory { . MRCN- EGE......,....;. ;i'..NAINLLAU
r R Pe g rV O yAMIERICAN LEAGUCE NATIONA asLEAGUE
East Cast
it L { .ct lV T . Pot. flu

A case against Space
By DREW BOGEMA
A great spectacle is about to come off. We're going to the
moon! Come July 16th American expertise will point a missile
toward the middle of the sky. A mighty thunderclap will roar
as powerful boosters fling the capsule far into distant space.
And, with luck, its shiny hull and sturdy legs will land a pair
of astronauts upon the distant sphere that for so long has
preocupied our fantasies and haunted our perversions.
Back home we will watch each stage in silent, uneasy, antici-
pation, lest unknown forces. or human error destroy the precious
moments of our long-awaited glory. Such a triumph! A man on
the moon! How distant and remote it seemed a decade back
after the Soviet Union hung thier abrasive Sputnik over our heads
and put Ike and all of us to shame. How could we, our leaders
cried, allow these inferior Communist blackguards relegate dear
America to second-place? And then, on top of it all, that balding
brat had the audacity and conceit to announce that his ideas and
men would bury our dearest dreams!
Our spirit fell, our heads hung with futile dread. A new chief-
tain gained power as we waited with delight for the national exert-
ion to catch and surpass those devils with their inhuman ideas and
unChristian ways. After all, our national way was synonymous
with good, our heritage of ingenuity the wonder of the world,
the things that happened in the States, some claimed, fore-
shadowed the eventual history of mankind. We waited with ap-
prehension for our confidence and.-spirit to be restored, our
labor and achievement to once again be vaulted high for all
the world to see and marvel at.
BUT WAIT Something's wrong here. Doubt lurks closely to
the edge of our collective conscience and the ugly head of guilt
is raised to suggest a dubious purpose, a childish whim, a mis-
begotten deed. Magazines and journals ask whether the accomp-
lishment will represent a laurel or a thorn. Our national priori-
ties lay elsewhere, some say, in the ghetto perhaps,min controlling
the machines, in straightening out our foreign policy, in destroy-
ing our empire. But never mind them, they do not matter; their
spokesmen and ideas a potpouri. of tommyrot and riffraff; evil
saboteurs of our deepest dreams.
A cosmic vision will arise! One that promises to free man
from the narrow concerns and selfish interests that plague
our ideals with avarice, greed, ambition, and ignorance, one that
will free us from war, exploitation, tyranny, and blight. We will
communicate with the stars, contact distant civilizations whose
knowledge will guarantee ever greater strides toward the event-
ual ascent to the utopia of man. We will extend our control
across the heavens. We will compress our civilization and export
it past the Milky Way. Man will finally control nature.
But then again, if we cannot control ourselves where are we?
Will not the adventure of the rocket and its crew foreshadow a
momentuous expansion and ruthless colonialization of the solar
system? Will we not transmit our ever-increasing capacity for
destruction along with the same ideas we have for so long
sought and failed to, make real? Together- with the infinite ra-
tionality of our computers will not also travel our fiercest pas-
sions, prejudices, and conflicts? Will the immensity of our task
be able to transcend the always evident barbarous, ugly, and
brutal nature of man? Will not the divisions, rivalries, and
loyalties that mark us as separate, the ones we carry with us
into the heavens just transform its serenity intq another battle-
ground for our senselessness?
FOR SURE, we do not have a chance to -win. The technocrats
are insistent upon doing their thing. The sights, the knowledge,
the joys, the mysteries all demand that we increase and enhance
our effort to a peak of exhilaration not collectively felt since
the end of Hitler's War. Our leaders will tell us that we must
maintain our present rate of research and development because
of the possibility our enemies will stick warheads to their satel-
lites, to surprise our sleep with a merciless attack some early
dawn. It is not possible to once again begin to iron out the
reasons why we are enemies the differences between cultures
and nations, to accept the continuing heritage of hatred and
deceit but force resolution through a new sincerity?
Our panic and hysteria, however, has been conditioned into
our minds by the mentors of science fiction - the Vonneguts,
Bradburys, Heinleins, and Clarkes. It is entirely possible that
space exploration will not involve any of the aforementioned
dangers. It is possible that the nations of the world will develop
an international agency to control development in a most ra-
tional and careful way. It is possible that the interest and moti-
vation that pushed us into this unrewarding adventure will wane,
making it indeed possible for men to turn inward to the waste-
lands of our culture. But it is not likely.
Can you imagine a distant day when people ask why such
expansion came about? . What will we say? "It seemed a good
idea, at the time," "because it was there,", or maybe, "we had
nothing better to do?"
Far better it would be after we have put a man on the
moon for us to quit, lending our expertise to the United Nations
if they decided such a venture was in order. Along this line
of /thought, witness the wisdom of Lewis Mumford:
"Any square mile of inhabited earth has more significance
for man's future than all the planets in our solar system. It is

not the outermost reaches of space, but the innermost recesses
of the human soul that now demand our most intense exploration
and cultivation."

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Tom Tresh and Don
Wert belted'home runs and drove
in three runs apiece last night,
making it easy for Lenny McLain
to become the American League's
first 12-game winner as the De-
troit Tigers walloped Boston 7-0.
McLain, 12-5, scattered eight
hits as the Tigers extended Bos-
ton's losing streak to five games
and moved within one-half game
of the second-place Red Sox in
the American League East.
Tresh slammed his third homer
in two days and a pair of singles
while Wert hit his third homer to
give Detroit a 1-0 lead in the
second.
The Tigers' long ball spree in-

cluded four doubles in a three-
run sixth as Bill Freehan, Jim
Northrup, Jim Price and Wert all
collected two-baggers off Red Sox
starter and loser Bill Landis.
He gave the 25,487 fans a scare
in the eighth when he was hit in
the left leg by a line drive off the
bat of Dick Schofield. McLain re-
covered the ball, threw out Scho-
field and fell to his knees but
shook off the injury and contin-
ued to pitch.
Cubs crunch Expos
' MONTREAL-Rookie Jim Qualls
drove in the first two runs of his
major league career with a fourth
inning triple and sparked the Chi-
cago Cubs to a 4-2 victory over
Montreal last night.
Qualls' blast scored Willie Smith,
who had singled, and Randy
Hundley, who. had walked, snap-
ping a 1-1 tie and sending Bill
Stoneman down to his eleventh
loss in fifteen decision. Qualls
eventually came home on Don.
Kessinger's sacrifice fly.
The Cubs took a 1-0 lead in the
first on singles by Kessinger and
Glenn Beckert and Ron Santo's
sacrifice fly. Montreal tied it in
BULLETIN
OAKLAND (OP) - Slugging
Reggie Jackson continued his
assault on the home run rec-
ords of Babe Ruth and Roger
Madis Wednesday night, slam-
ming his 31st, 32nd and 33rd as
the Oakland Athletics whipped
Seattle 5-0.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
LEE KIRK

ing the New York Yankees to Baltimore
their second straight victory, 3-2, Boston
over the high-riding Baltimore Dashrit
Orioles. New York

W L P
55 23
43 33
41 32 ;
41 39 3
38 42 .
29 47

I

I
7

the third on Stoneman's double
and singles by Gary Sutherlandr
and Rusty Staub. The other Expo
tally came on singles by Mack
Jones, Bob Bailey and Coco La-
boy.
Phils stretch streak
PITTSBURGH - Reliever Al
Raffo drove in three runs with
a single and a squeeze bunt while
pitching his first major league
victory as, Philadelphia battered
Pittsburgh 14-4 last night for
their ninth straight victory.
Raffo capped a four-run second
inning with a two-run single and
then squeezed in an insurance
run with a bases-loaded bunt in
the sixth.
Starter Billy Champion gave up:
two runs in the first and left the
game with two outs and the bases:
loaded. Raffo got Fred Patek to
hit into a force out to end the:
inning.
Yanks clip Birds
Mel Stottlemyre scattered eightl
hits and Horace Clarke cracked'
out three hits yesterday in pac-I

The American League's Eastern'
Division leaders snapped the
streak in the ninth when they
threatened to pull it out. Paul
Blair led off with a double down
the left field line and scoredon
Frank Robinson's single to cen-I
ter. Stottlemyre, however, got
Boog Powell, who drove in seven
runs Tuesday night, on a fly to
center and forced Brooks Robin-
son to hit into a game-ending
double play.
The Yankees got the winning
run in the sixth on a pair of
walks, a bunt single by Frank
Fernandez and Bobby Murcher's.
ground out, which scored Bill Rob-
inson.

Oakland
Minnesota
Seattle
Kansas City
Chicago
California

West
41
43
35
32
31
26

31
33
40
44
43
48

.

Cleveland

Pt..
705
566
X62
513
475
382
569
566
467
.421
.419
.351

G11
11.
15
18
25
11
11
16

I
'' k
r
3

Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Houston
San Di)ego.

SWest
45
46
41
38
39
27

Chicago
New Yor
Pittsburg
Philadellp
St. Louis
Montreal

29
30
36
34
40
54

.
.#
.

W L . F
50 28 .
k 41 34 .
ll 38 40
hia 35 39
37 42
22 53

Yt.
.641
.547
.487
.473
.468
.293
.608
.605
.532
.528
.494
.332

Results
Ne-= York 3. Baltimore 2
Detroit 7, Boston 0
Washington 5, Cleveland 1
Kansas City 1, California 0
Minnesota 4, Chicago 2
Oakland 5, Seattle 0
Today's Games
Washington at Cleveland
Seattle at Oakland
Minnesota at Chicago
California at Kansas City
Boston at Detroit
Only games scheduled.

Results
Chicago 4, Montreal 2
New York 6, St. Louis 4, 14 inn,
Philadelphia 12, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 9, Cincinnati 4
San Francisco 6, San Diego 3
Houston at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
Chicago at Montreal
New York at St. Louis
Atlanta at San Francisco
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
only games scheduled.

71.
12
13
131,
26'.
5',,
21'.

ANN ARBOR COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES
(Bet Midrash )
Sponsored by
ThmeDetroit College of Jewish Studies (midrasha)
SUMMER COURSES -
HEBREW-Beginning, Intermediate, and Conversational
Mr. Shmuel Raz, Tuesday and Thursday 7 p.m. (tentative)
-For further information call 971-1865-
YIDDISH-Intermediate. Dr. Charles Krahmalkov
Tuesday Evening - For further information call 665-4844
CONTEMPORARY JEWISH LIFE-Prospects and Problems
Mr. Robert Rockaway (761-7768 Tuesday, 8:30-10 p.m.
REGISTRATION-Tuesday and Wednesday, July 1 and 2 and 8 and 9
8 - 9 p.m. at Hillel - 1429 Hill Street
FIRST CLASSES- Hebrew, Thursday, July 3. Others Tuesday, July 8

41

Tom Tresh

King moves to Wimbledon finals

WIMBLETON, England (A) -
California's Billie Jean King, aim-
ing for a record-tying fourth
straight Winbleton crown, and;
England's Ann Haydon Jones, up-
set conqueror of Margaret Smiths
Court, will battle tomorrow f o r
tennis' most prestigious champ-
ionship.
The two touring professionalsa
advanced to the final yesterday
with strikingly contrasting vic-
tories.
Mrs. King, a bouncy, 25-year-old
from Long Beach, crushed nervous
Rosemary Casals of San Fran-
cisco, 6-1, 6-0, in the first emi-
final that required just 30
minutes.'
Rosie, a 20-year-old pro who
tours with Mrs. King, won only
13 points in the lopsided match
that brought only the barest rip-
ple of applause from the 15,000
fans packed around the center
court.
The spectators, however, rock-
ed the staid old tennis center
with applause as Mrs. Jones, a
30-year-old blonde, rallied to up-'
set Mrs. Court 26, the top-seed-
ed played from Australia, 10-12,
6-3, 6-2, in a two-hour classic.
The men's semifinals will be
played today with Arthur Ashe,
the No. 1 American from Rich-
mond, Va., trying to hold the
fort against three Australian
pros.
Ashe will meet Rod Laver, the
defending championaand top
seed. Tony Roche, beaten in the
final by Laver last year, will take
on John Newcombe, the champ-

ion in 1967 when Wimbledon still
was an all-amateur tournament.
The men's final will be played
Saturday, with Laver favored to
make it two straight and four in
all. He also won in 1961 and 1962
as an amateur.
Mrs. King, an erratic player
most of the year, hopes to emu-
late California's Helen Wills
Moody, who won Wimbledon four
straight times - 'from 1937
through 1940.
She may be hard pushed by
Mrs. Jones. This was Ann's
eighth semifinal but it will only
be her second final. Two years
ago Billie Jean beat her in the
championship match in straight
sets.
The Briton, racing around the
court like a youngster, ran up
5-2 leads in each set. She didn't
let down after losing the opening
set to Mrs. Court's strong come-
back.
Mrs. Jones just kept on hitting
and running in an exciting match
that had the crowd in an up-
roar. Both played magnificent
tennis but the British star was
up for her greatest game.
In thefinal set she broke the
powerful Aussie's strong service
three times in four games.

It was one of the finest women's
matches ever played here and
both received a standing ova-
tion as they left the court.
The defeat ended the Austra-
lian's hopes for a grand slam.
She had won the Australian and
French titles on her comeback
this year.
Mrs. Court, the 1963 and 1965
Wimbledon champion, had retir-
ed and then married. She decided
to return to big-time competition
for just one year.
All Mrs. King had to do in her
match was to keep the ball in the
court. Rosie, normally a busty-
bustling player, seemed to have
legs of lead and the match was
a slaughter. She seemed scared
to rush the netand her serves
sailed gently over the barrier,
asking to be killed.

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!
" NO WAITING
* 6 BARBERS
0 OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
at Maple Village-Campus

LeeeomRing
JULUY 4,1776
.K..r
rr-MICHIGAN COUNGl. TO REPEAL T HE DRAFT
-... -- ---mmm mm m..--------------- ------m.. -- ----- ------- m
Enclosed is my contribution: $.._ _which will be used to continue the
work of MCRD's all volunteer staff and friends.
NAME____ -. --______
ADDRSS CITY ZIP
cf ;myb ae u cD 99Nra AnAbr c 80

I
I

I

r

.

SUBJECTS
WANTED

NO EXCUSE
Life expectancy for farmworkers is 49
years. NO EXCUSE. Average annual
earnings for migrant workers notion-
ally is $1,307. NO EXCUSE. Infant
mortality rate is 125% higher than the
national rate. NO EXCUSE.
WHAT CAN- YOU DO:
Boycott Kroger's and any other store
which sells California Grapes.
JOIN THE GRAPE BOYCOTT COMMIT?

I9

Listening
Experiment
$1.00 for 15 minutes
Must be right handed
with no hearing disorders
CALL MR. PISONI
764-2594

TEE

Phone 769-1326 for information

I

I I

I

-I

A1

i

discount records,
300S. STATE - 1235 S. UNIVERSITY

-HOURS-

'a

0'

Mon.-Fri. 9:30 - 9
Saturday 9:30 - 6
Sun. 12-5 (S. Univ. only)

Presents to you

DON'T FORGET-

. Joan Lee Hooker 'snewS TAX L.P.
"That's Where, It's At r"
WILL BE ON SPECIAL. SALE
TOMORROW (July 4th)
12-7 p.m.
at our 1235 S. University Store

SPECIAL

OF

ER

for $25

. . ONE PAIR OF PANTS, plus
. ONE FITTED TUNIC TOP
... MACHINE WASHABLE

I

i

I

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan