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May 17, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-17

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Friday, May 17, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, May 17, L968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
S

,,,

Vietnam peace tallks may falter
over buffer zone disagreement

4 PARIS (P) - A serious disagree-
ment appears to be developing in
the Paris peace talks over re-
establishing an effective buffer
zone between North and South
Vietnam as an important step
toward scaling down the war.'
The outcome of U.S.-North
Vietnamese discussions on this
issue could vitally influence fu-
ture decisions by President John-
son on ending the rest of the
bombing and other acts of war
against North Vietnam.
SU.S. authorities analyzing the
problem are reported to believe
that the discussions on this issue
so far show it to be a real issue
as distinguished from arguments
made and poses struck in the

conference here primarily for
their impact on world opinion.
North Vietnamese representa-
tive Xuan Thuy, demanded,
Wednesday that the United States
halt all military actions against
North Vietnam, including "the
bombardment of artillery based
in the southern part of the DMZ"
as well as air strikes there and
elsewhere.
He also demanded that the
United States withdraw from the
zone, but U.S. officials said nei-
ther the United States nor its al-
lies had established bases or sent
troops into the zone for other than
brief sweep operations. They said
so far as they knew no U.S. or
allied troops are there now.
Thus Thuy's call for the United

States to evacuate the zone-like
his argument that only U.S. con-
cessions can bring success to the
Paris talks - is considered on
the American side to be mainly
aimed at world opinion. But the
question of military operations in
the area of the zone is critical.
U.S. Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman proposed to Thuy
Wednesday that the United States
and North Vietnam agree on joint
measures to revive the demilitar-
ized zone as a buffer.
Deaths increase
in VietnamWar
SAIGON (P)--North Vietnam-
ese troops launched strong attacks
yesterday north of Saigon and in
the Central Highlands as the U.S.
Command announced that more
American soldiers were killed in
combat last week than in any
week of. the Vietnam war.
U.S. Command said 562 Amer-
icans were killed, 19 more than
the previous record in the week
of Feb. 1147.
A U.S. spokesman said much of
the American death toll resulted
from heavy action in the north-
ernmost provinces, where U.S.
Marines fought several battles last
week around Dong Ha, 11 miles
south of the demilitarized zone.

House delays
surtax action
May increase budget deficit,
yield higher income taxes
WASHINGTON (R) - House leaders have postponed ac-
tion on the compromise $10-billion income surtax bill, and
this means that taxpayers may have to pay more when they
file their returns next year.
It also may push the potential budget deficit for the
current fiscal year ending June 30 to $25 billion.
As now written, the 10 per cent tax surcharge approved
by Senate House negotiators as part of the compromise pack-
age calling also for $6 billion in spending cuts would go into
effect as of last April 1 for y

Open: WHISTLE STOP
Serving Hot Roast Beef and Corned Beef Sand-
wiches. Fast take out service. In our delicatessen
department--Hebrew National products.

-Associated Press
Happy Birthday
Yesterday marked the six month anniversary of Detroit's continuing newspaper strike. Two mem-
bers of the typographical union picket the emp ty Free Press loading dock. Negotiations are still
deadlocked.
'POOR' PEOPLE:
Finances slowmarch

611 S. FOREST
Across from
AA parking structure

WEEKDAYS:
11 A.M. to 12 Midnight
FRIDAYS and SATURDAYS:
Until 2 A.M.

li



___

THE POLITICS OF 1968
The politics of 1968, the politics of Kennedy and cCarthy, indicate that
America has been transformed into a nation opposed to the Viet Nam
war and a people who have repudiated consensus politics. Americans are
seeking realistic answers to specific crises both at home and abroad.
A number of political figures have attempted to change their outward
appearances so they will not be viewed as espousing yesterday's com-
promises, compromises with America's future. The voters will have to
decide whether a slightly altered image should be the basis for electoral
support or whether more should be requird from tomorrow's leaders.
Images must not overrun issues. Today's voters cannot accept a public
figure who believes that a picture of him in Selma, Alabama, is more
important than espousing legislation providing for a minimum yearly
income of $4000.00 per family.
The President of the United States realized that he could not provide the
leadership of tomorrow based on the liberalism of the 50's. We must have
as high a standard from our congressional candidates. Wouldn't you
rather support Jerome Dupont for Congress?
Paid for by the Dupont for Congress Committee, Box D, Ann Arbor, Mich.,
Albert Schneider, M.D., chairman.

I I I ,

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Poor
People's Campaign halted a cara-
van of 1,000 marchers in Pitts-
burgh, Pa., yesterday for a two
day delay while leaders tried to
close a construction lag at their
Washington encampment.
Campaign leaders said con-
struction was trailing two to three
days behind schedule. The Rev.
Bernard Lafayette, campaign co-
ordinator, said, If we don't get
TONIGHT & TOMORROW at
RODGERS' & HAMMERSTEIN'S
OIKLAHOMA
"Oscar Hammerstein & I owe our
professional lives to it'' - R.
Rodgers
Featuring Shirley Jones, Rod I
Steiger & Gordon MacCrae;
also the songs you remember,
from "Surrey With the Fringe
On Top" to "Pore Jud Is Daid"
in color at 7:00 & 9:30
ARCHITECTURE AUD.-75c '
(Note change in regular schedule
"Casablanca" was shown earlier.
"East of Eden" will be hopefully
later in the summer.)

more money, we'll have to stop
construction."
Lafayette placed the cost of
building "Resurrection 'C i t y,
U.S.A.," now about one third com-
pleted on the Mall near- the Lin-
coln Memorial, at about $3 mil-
lion. He wouldn't say how much
had been spent, but claimed a
$100,000 reserve fund is "just
about exhausted."
But construction of the shan-
ties seemed to continue at a rapid
pace with no evident shortage of
building materials. Some staff
members said privately they were
not aware money was a serious
problem.
"TheSouthern Christian Lead-
ership Conference has beeh on,
the verge of going, broke since
it was founded," one said. La-
Ee6~
AIR CHARTER
SERVICE -
* Round-the-clock service
" 6 place aircraft
s Rates as low as 25
per mile
call 663.7771
for information
Ann Arbor Municipal Airport
,4322 South State Road
Ann Arbor, Michigan

fayette himself predicted that de-
spite financial problems, the city
would be finished.
"We have faith in the American
people to help us fulfill this
dream," he said.
Campaign leaders estimated
about 500 persons have moved
into the long rows of tent shaped,
unpainted plywood shelters in the
park between the Lincoln Memo-
rial and the Washington Monu-
ment. Most'of the early arrivals
came from Mississippi and Ten-
nessee.
About 320 more protesters reach-
ed Washington from Chicago yes-
terday. Downtown churches ar-
ranged temporary housing for
them.-
The shantytown, which is plan-
ned to house 3,000 demonstrators
by next week, remains about three
fourths unfinished. A University
of Maryland architectural profes-
sor, John Wiebenson, who design-
ed the camp ,said - there is no
shortage of material, but labor is
lagging behind schedule.
WORK FOR
McCa rtlhy
in Friday's
AICHIGAN COUNTY
CONVENTIONS
For Information,
Call 663-7076 or 761-1292

individuals and last Jan. 1
for corporations.
The Treasury Department had
fixed June 10 as the tentative
date to begin collecting the sur-
charge through increased payroll
deductions - if the House and
Senate acted quickly on the com-
promise.
Whatever additional tax was
owed for the period between April
1 and June 10 would have been
paid by the taxpayer when he
filed his return early in the next
calendar year.
REVISED TIMETABLE
But House leaders disclosed
yesterday they have, decided to
delay any vote at least until the
first week in June, forcing the
Treasury to revise its timetable.
What this delay does is increase,
estimated revenues from the tax
package to $15.22 billion in the
next fiscal year, moving $1.18
million in potential collections out
of the current fiscal year.
Actually, the tax increase would
go into effect 15 days after it is
signed by President Johnson and
he has never said he will accept
the compromise.
Because of the delay,, the
Treasury will get no new revenue
in the current fiscal year from
the surcharge or the planned
speedup of corporate tax pay-
ments.
The only additional revenue
will be $306 million from exten-
sion of the automobile and tele-
phone excise taxes which the gov-
ernment is still collecting.
BUDGET DEFICIT
Coupled with increased defense
costs, the changed revenue esti-
mates will mean a potential bud-
get deficit of $25 billion this year
and perhaps as low as $2.3 bil-
lion next year. r
As for the increased deficit, the
delay in the House will slice again
the Treasury's estimate of tax
collections in the current fiscal
year.
-But revenue lost now will be
piclted up in the new fiscal year
which begins July 1 and produce
an even lower deficit then.

Gold ,hits
newhgh
inL llol
LONDON UP) - The price of
gold bullion jumped toan aln
time, high of $41.75 an ounce on
the ,London gold market -yester-
day, but most gold hoarders re-
fused to sell,
Speculators held onto their
gold - much of it bought at the
official price of $35 an ounce -
and waited for even higher prices
and a bigger profit.
The closing price was set be-
tween $41.20 and $41.50.
The price on the ,Paris market
shot up to $41.40.
FEW SELLERS
With buyers greatly outnum-
bering sellers, London's five bul-
lion dealers did not have enough
gold to .meet the demand, so the
record price was posted to fend
off buyers.
At one point before the official
afternoon price fixing - set at a
new peak of $41.25, up 40 cents
f4rom the morning price, - bulllonl
was changing hands at $41.75.
Trading was kept to a small
scale and there was nothing re-
sembling a new gold rush.
POUND STRUCK
The ~fluctuating gold price,
however, struck at the pound on
the foreign exchange market and
sterling, dipped by 26 points, to
$2.3877. The Bank of England's
reserves were left untouched,
however, and the pound began re-
covering.
Market sources said the uneasi
ness of the pound was boosting
the demand for gold.
The dollar stayed firm - an in-
dication that speculators were not
abandoning paper money for gold
the way they did An this spring's
gold rush.

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11I

S ~/
A $ I.>
LEVI'S* FOR GALS
The look you love -the trim Levi's jeans'look in all-.cotton and
Sta-Prest cotton blends. Pick from a great selection
of keep-cool colors.

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FSaturday, 9::0 M

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GALLA MOON BALL
Swing to the strains of the
FARMERS MARKET

50c adi.

I

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at
BOB
W HITE741
1421 H111 5t.
8:30 P.M.

I

returning from his tour, of coffee
houses on the East coast by over-
whelming popular demand tox sing
traditional ballads, fun songs, and
contemporary folk music - playing
guitar, banjo, and AUTOHARP.

I

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$1.00 cover includes free food

.,
,
i

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Russ Gibb presents in Detroit
PROCULIIA-RUM
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Admission $3.50
The Influence, Nivana, and
the Nickel Plate Express

JUST ARRIVED!
COTTON TURTLENECKS $1.95 & $2.29
Short and Long Sleeve

r , .., /f i! ' , trr., . .r'f r ffr J.. t.'rtrff1 f t f << s f?''ff

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