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August 15, 1968 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1968-08-15

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THE MICH16AN DAILY

Thursday, August 15, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, August 15, 1968

Canadians

save

NL

franchise

LANI LOKEN, a Michigan sophomore, demonstrates a perfect pike during training for the upcoming
Olympic diving trials. Miss Loken placed eighth in the national AAU championships two weeks ago,
and with past- AAU champ Micki King gives'Michigan a great opportunity for representation on
the Olympic team.
'Al'well r -epretsented as.
'968 Oympicsapproach

By PHIL BROWN
Summer Sports Editor
For most of us the end of August means either
1) summer is over, or 2) school is starting; most
of us, in fact, are forced to accept both inter-
pretations.
For at least one select group, however, August
is no more than a heartbeat away from Septem-
ber, which is nothing less than a stepping-stone
to October. And October could mean an easy-to-
take working vacation in Mexico City.
While the Big Ten is figured to send surprising-
ly few athletes with the United States Olympic
Team this year, Michigan is expected to be very
well represented.
No less than four divers will carry Michigan's
colors in the upcoming Olympic Trials in Long
Beach, Cal., while at least, two Wolverine tankers
may be in the swim at Mexico City.
Almost certain to wave the Michigan flag in
Aztec land are a pair of Wolverine gymnasts, al-
though they will be among numerous representa-'
tives of foreign countries who attend the Uni-
versity.
Also expected to go to the 1968 Summer Games
are Juai Bello, a swimmer of considerable talent,
and Alex McDonald, graduated captain of this
year's track team. Bello will compete for Peru.
while McDonald's allegiance is to his native
Jamaica.
The list goes on and on, containing such lumin-
aries as swimmer Carl Roble, a veteran of the
Tokyo Games of 1964, and Ron Kutschinski,
whose half-mile heroics'have made him a popular
dark horse candidate for a team berth.
And-while all have worked very hard in hopes
of finding a place in the Mexican sun, possibly
no group has punished itself more than the par-
ticipants in the aquatic sports - swimming and
diving-
Two men will represent Michigan on the trial
boards in California - sophomore Dick Rydze,
and Jay Meaden, a senior. Like all of Dick Kitn-
ball's products they can be confidently labeled
"Olympic timber."
Kimball, the Wolverine diving coach, has spent
the summer with dozens of determined competi-
tors, and now can do no more than sit back and

pray that his prodding will result in another
Olympic champion.
Accompanying Rydze and Meaden will be a
comely pair of distaff divers, one a relative new-
comer and one an established veteran in com-
petitive diving..
Micki King is a past national AAU outdoor
champion determined to regain her rightful place
among the pool elite after being relegated to
sixth place in this dear's title meet.
Also bolstering Kimball's chances for coaching
success is sophomore Lani Loken, daughter of
Wolverine gym coach Newt Loken and a star in
her own right.
Both girls will compete on two boards, the ten-
meter (or tower) and three-meter. Meaden will
also go from both boards, while Rydze will be
diving only from the tower.
There is no one-meter competition in the
Olympics, which limits American divers some-
what because of the predominance of one-meter
events in the U.S.
Further handicapping American divers is the
system used for judging Olympic diving. Under
Olympic rules all divers must perform a certain
number of required dives before their optional
dives.
The required dives invariably out-number the
optionals, which not only limits truly talented
divers but makes judging the competition ex-
tremely difficult.,
The airborne ballet that is diving has a more
down-to-earth parallel in gymnastics, and Michi-
gan's contribution to that area of Mexico's mad-
ness is as impressive as the divers.
After two national trial meets, a pair of Wol-
verines held the top spots for the Canadian gym
squad.
Gil Larnse, captain of the 1963 Michigan team
and that year's NCAA all-around champion, seems
to have a solid hold on first; Sid Jensen a sen-
sational sophomore from last season's team, is
securely in second.
Also given a chance of making the Canadian
team is Fred Rodney, who was eighth after two
trials but needs to move up two places to make
the trip south. His opportunity comes this week-
end, at the final trial meet in Toronto.

MONTREAL () - Montreal
secured its National League base-
ball franchise yesterday.
Sponsors of the team beat the
deadline by more than 24 hours
when they turned over a check
for $1,120,000 in United States
funds to league president Warren
Giles at a news conference here.
At the same time, John McHale,
a leading baseball figure, was
named president and chief execu-
tive of the team and Jim Fanning,
a close friend of McHale, was
named general manager.
Lester B. Pearson, former Prime
Minister of Canada, was named
honorary president of the still un-
named team.
The $1,120,000 was the initial
payment of the $10 million fran-
chise fee.
"Montreal is now a full-fledged
member of the league," Giles told
a jammed-packed audience.
"I believe Montreal is a vibrant
city,' 'Giles said. "I'm sure you're
going to enjoy baseball here. In
fact, I know you'll enjoy it."
Charles Bronfman, a leading
sponsor of the new team, was
named chairman of the board of
the Montreal syndicate while Paul
Beaudry, a new backer and Mon-
treal cement company executive,
and Lorne Webster, an original
backer, were named vice-chair.-
men.
McHale, who has been connect-
ed with organized baseball for 28
years, announced the club has
hired three scouts - Ed Lopat,
Bobby Bragan and Johnny Moore,
all former big league players.
McHale, who held the post as
administrator in baseball Com-
missioner William D.. Eckert's of-
fice, said he joined the club be-
cause he had a chance to invest
in it and because of the challenge
of handling a new club.
Fanning was assistant general
manager of the Braves from 1964
and held that position until as-
suming the scouting and farming
duties of the Braves in September,
1966.
City officials who attended the
news conference, including May-
or Jean Drapeau, did not an-
nounce plans for Jarry Park, in
north Montreal, which will be us-
ed as a temporary stadium for
the team until a new park is con-;
structed in -192,'
Mayor Drapeau told the gather-
ing he preferred not to speak dur-
ing the news conference but did
say that faith "saved the fran-
chise."
"Gerry Snyder had faith right
from the beginning and I thank
him," the mayor said.
Snyder, vice-chairman of the
city's executive committee,, was
the man who took Montreal's case
to Chicago for expansion talks
and sold the National League on
Montreal.
1 /21
Bll board.-
Freshman football coach Bill
Dodd has scheduled a meeting'
at 4 p.m., Aug. 26, at the Ath-
letie Building, 1000 S. State St.,
for anyone wishing to try out
for the Michigan freshman
football team.

*

Irate tourney sponsors step into PGA battle

By The Associated Press
NEW 'FORK (.') - The Pro-
fessional Golfers Association kept
the door open to the rebelling
tournament pros yesterday as
players stiffened their determina-
tion to strike out on a tour of
their own.
"I don't believe the PGA posi-
tion has been fairly presented to
the players," said Max Elbin, PGA
president, from his office at the
Burning Tree Golf Club in Beth-
esda, Md.
"We would like to appear be-
fore a meeting of all the men so
that we can present the facts of
the case. I don't believe - when.
AND BIRDS LOSE

the issues are aired - that the
situation is irreconcilable."
Gardner Dickinson, Jr., chair-
man of the Players Tournament
dailyt
spor, ts
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

Committee, said he felt a limit
had been reached in negotiations.
"The PGA knows what we want
and has refused to budge," Dick-
inson said. "I honestly wish that
we could get together, but it
doesn't appear possible. I just
hope it isn't nasty."
The tournament p l a y e r s,
through their New York attorney
Sam Gates, announced Tuesday
that they would divorce the PGA,
at the end of existing tournament
contracts, and form an indepen-
dent organization for conduct of
the $5.6 million tour.
The action caught tournament
sponsors, television officials and

Surging Tigers whitewash Indians, 3-0

*

many of the players themselves
by surprise.
The 16-man PGA executive
committee has called an emergen-
cy meeting Friday at the National
Headquarters in Palm Beach Gar-
dens, Fla. Sponsors have been
summoned to a meeting in Hous-
ton Sept. 5-6.
Meanwhile, the people who
stage professional golf tourna-
ments - the local sponsors -
stepped into the PGA revolt and3
said they plan to flex their m~us-
les to get a piece of the action
in running the pro tour.
Angus M. Mairs of Minneapolis,
president of the International
Golf Sponsors' Association, said
the group he heads wants to add
its voice to the decision-making
in administering the pro golf tour.
The revolt by the tour pros
against the so-called establish-
ment in the PGA, which, broke
,into the open Tuesday, also brings
to a head the matter of how much
say sponsors should *have in run-
ning the tour, Mairs said.
"I've received calls from all ov-
er the country in the past few
weeks from sponsors wh are fed
up to here," Mairs told The Asso-
ciated Press. "In recent years I
think there has been almost overt
action on the part of the PGA to
ignore the sponsors."
The IGSA, Mairs said, wants'ja
voice in the scheduling of tourna-
ments, and a voice in the televi-
sion contracts.
"Instead of the present plan of
four players and four PGA rep-
resentatives on the governing
board, I would say a final com-
mittee that would work out the
schedule should also include four
representatives of the sponsors,
at least. This is an example of
what we're aiming at."

By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Bill Freehan's
18th home run launced the De-
troit Tigers to a 3-0 victory over
Cleveland last night as Joe Spar-
ma and Mickey Lolich checked the
Indians on six hits.

It was the Tiger's sixth victory
over Cleveland in seven games
over a nine-day span.
Freehan homered off Indians'
ace Luis Tiant in the second in-
ning, giving Sparma a 1-0 lead.
Al Kaline doubled in the sixth
and scored on Gates Brown's

.A

i

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Detroit 76 43 .639 -
Baltimore 68 49 .581 7
Boston 65 55 .542 11l'
Cleveland 64 58 .525 131
Oakland 61 57 .517 14,1
Minnesota 55 61 .474 19!
xNew York 53 60 .469 20
xCalifornia 53 65 .449 22r
Chicago 49 68 .419 26
Washington 44 72 .379 3012
x-Late game not included.
Yesterday's Results
Washington 4, Minnesota 2
Oakland 4, Baltimore 1
Chicago 5-5, Boston 3-7, day-night
Detroit 3, Cleveland 0
New York at California, inc.
Today's Games
Chicago at Boston
New York at Oakland, night
Washington at California, night
Baltimore at Minnesota 2, twi-night
Only games scheduled.

*

*

NATIONAL LEAGUE

single before Norm Cash tripled
off the right field wall.
Lolich replaced Sparma with
two on and one out in the fourth,
struck out pinch hitter Chico Sal-
mon and got Larry Brown to
ground out, then scattered three
hiths the rest of the way for his
11th victory against seven losses.
The Indians failed to capitalize
on several scoring opportunities,
leaving 10 runners stranded.
OAKLAND - Reggie Jackson's
two-run homer in the sixth inning
powered the Oakland A's to a 4-1
victory over the Baltimore Orioles
yesterday.
Jackson's homer, his 21st of the
sea┬žon, came against loser Dave
Leonhard.
Don Buford homered in the'
sixth for Baltimore's only run.

St. Louis
Chicago
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
New York
Los Angeles
Houston

W L Pct .NGB
77 43 .642 -
64 56 .533 13
62 56 .525 14
59 56 .513 15%4
61 59 .508 16
56 63 .471 2014
55 62 .470 202
56 66 .459 22
53 66 .445 2311
52 68 .433 25

Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 3, Chicago 1
New York 4, Los Angeles 1
Philadelphia 4, Houston 3
Cincinnati 7, Atlanta 4
San Francisco 2, Pittsburgh 1, 10 inn.
Today's Games
St. Louis at Chicago
Houston at Philadelphla, night
San Francisco at Pittsburgh, night
only games scheduled.

I

ELDRIDGECLEAVER
SPEAKS,

Persian, Indian, Bengali and Madras
BEDSRE'A',ADS 0
India Art Shop
0 330 Maynard
<""" """O'""> C m

A.

4 p.m. T
Hill Auditorium,

rhursday, Aug. 15
$2 donation

Eldridge Cleaver is Minister of Information of the
Black Panther Party, author of Soul on lee, and a
New Politics Party candidate for President of the
U. S.

theswifcched-on class

i

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
----I

IN

( :ontinued fro : Page 2
Programmer, SPECTRA 70. Sales Rep-
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Men or women, degree and data pro-
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Area Office of Large Publishing Firm'
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req., teaching exper. pref.
Area Weekly Newspapers - 2 Editor-
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degree and/or newspaper bckrnd. pre-
ferred. One is 30 or so hrs. week, other
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Applied Management Research, Inc.,
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Consultants to Management, Birpi-
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assistant and secretary, prefer woman,
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skills should 'V good. Perhaps a person
without a degree and 1-2 years In busi-
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would be considered.

isunt records, 1235 S. University
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WORSTED WHIP-
CORD whips up into
one of fall's more
handsome blazers: a
six-buttoned shaped
coat with. high side
vents, natural shoul-
ders, slanted flap
pockets, and heavy
welting all around.
Navy blue, naturally,
with gold buttons.
From our Charter Club
collection at $55. And
this is just one; we
have other six-button
double-breasteds in
hopsacks and inter-
esting patterns.

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