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August 02, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-08-02

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Friday, August 2, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, August 2, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

Congress halts employment cut;
Saturday mail service continues

LBJ

asks world

WASHINGTON (/P) - Congress
voted yesterday to exempt postal
workers and several other cate-
gories from the employment cut-
back it imposed on the federal
government.
The action headed off a shut-
down of smaller post offices and
cuts in other postal services, in,-
eluding Saturday delivery, which
had been due to start this week-
end.
In addition to saving the Jobs of
an estimated 83,000 postal work-
ers, the exemptions voted by the
House would spare some FBI em-
ployes and add 2,399 new jobs in
the federal air traffic control
system.
Exemptions from the personnel
cutback which Congress itself or-
dered in passing the 10 per cent
income tax surcharge brought this
comment from Rep. Charles R.
Jonas (R-N.C.), of the House
Appropriations Committee:

"The snowball has started roll-
ing now and there's no way to
stop it."
The Post Office exemption was
sped to President Johnson ty the
House just one day in advance of
the Aug. 2 date Postmaster Gen-
eral W. Marvin Watson had set
to start closing nearly 350 fourth-{
class post offices.
Watson also had ordered all
ocal post offices closed on Sat-
urdays, starting this week, and
less frequent mail collections.
"Because of this action," he
said in a statement, "I have called
off plans for postal service cut-
backs scheduled for this Saturday,
and service' will be normal."
Watson said the congressional
action "means that the Post Of-
fice will get the additional people
required to handle the two billion-
piece increase in mail expected
this year."
Watson had ordered the service
curtailment in response to the
congressional edict that federal
employment be rolled back to 1966
levels.
Despite grumbling that Watson
was blackmailing Congress into
taking his department off the
economy hook, the House passed
the bill 345-to-24.
In addition, the House decided
to exempt personnel engaged in
air traffic control operations of
the Federal Aviation Administra-
tion.
The exemption was written into
a House bill by the Senate and
the House accepted the change.

to restrain Hanoi
Seeks international aid in persuading
enemy to restrain military buildup
WASHINGTON (R) - President Johnson sought interna-
tional help yesterday in persuading North Vietnam to match
U.S. restraint in the Vietnam war.
The plea to world opinion was issued in a formal White
House statement one day after Johnson warned the United
States it can expect a massive attack by the enemy in Viet-
nam.
The statement was issued following a half-hour meeting
between Johnson and William J. Jorden, a member of the
U.S. d'elegation to the Parist,

Peace talk delegate Jorden confers with President Johnson
SOVIET DEFEAT?

Postmaster Watson

Chambers Brothers,
IRON BUTTERFLY
Sly and The Family Stone
WABX-FM presents
Underground- Sounds
Ford Auditorium, August 10
2 SHOWS: 5:30 p.m.'and 9:30 p.m.

Czech
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
Results of the showdown meet-
ing between Czechoslovakia's re-
form Communists and Soviet lead-
ers seem to be unclear, with the
Russians struggling to stave off
the appearance of defeat.
Until the tense border meeting
at Cierna in Slovakia, Soviet
pressure on Czechoslovakia was
so heavy and so public that it

Come Hear!

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Come Vote for your favorites

RESERVED TICKETS ONLY:
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suggested no room for compro-
mise.
Tomorrow there will be a new
meeting, in Bratislava, Slovakia,
with Moscow's faithful four bloc
allies taking part. The Russians
still face alternatives which leave
them little room for victory.
The way out for Moscow, to
save some face, may be keyed to
an agreement between Czechoslo-
vakia and "the five"-the U.S.S.R.
Poland, Bulgaria, East Germany
and Hungary - on Prague's fu-
ture attitude toward its next-door
neighbor, West Germany.
The alleged threat of West Ger-
many to the Communist bloc has
been one of the reasons given for
the severe Soviet pressure on
Czechoslovakia, a sensitive out-
post of the Warsaw military pact.
Perhaps the Russians will be
obliged to settle for a (zechioslo-
vak pledge to follow Moscow's
general foreign policy line with
a promise to keep the West Ger-
-mans at arm's length.
Tonight and Tomorrow
CINEMA GUILD
A
NIGHT OF
CHARLIE
CHAPL IN
FILMS

Such an outcome, however,
would be a poor substitute fcr
'what the Russians wanted -- a
reversal of the whole Czechoslovak
Internal trend toward liberaliza-
tion.
The Russians had a poor choice.
Having committed themselves
against the Czechoslovak move-
ment, they could resort to crude
measures, up to or including
naked military force, and thus
risk severe new damage to inter-
national communism. Or they
could back away. One way or the
other, it would be a bad bargain.
The Russians may still hope
to reverse the Czechoslovak vrend
by using economic weapons to
help hard-line Muscovites in
Prague restore themselves to
power.
The political, economic and
military pressure on Czechoslo-
vakia has been extreme for sev-
eral months.
If it appears to fail, Moscow
will be left with more problems
than it started with. The Russians
went for broke. They demanded
reestablishment of total control,
re-imposition of tight censorship,
a elampdown on the influx of
Western visitors, and an unlimited
right to station troops inside
Czechoslovakia.
The noncommittal wording of
the Cierna communique suggests
the Russians are far from satIsi
Pied. The fact that the meeting
tomorrow 'vill also be on Czecho-
slovak soil, however, indicates
that the Prague side stubbornly
and successfully held its ground.
The Famous
CHARGING
RHINOCEROS
OF -SOUL
Dance-Concert
CANTERBURY
HOUSE
SUNDAY, Aug: 4
9 p.m. '$1.00

peace talks. The meeting was
not announced in advance.
> Johnson, the statement said,
told Jorden : "The world had
called upon the United States to
exercise restraint in Vietnam"
and he responded March 31 by
limiting the bombing area of
North Vietnam.
"The President now hoped that
the world wouldcall on North
Vietnam to show similar re-
straint," the statement said.
Johnson was reported to have
expressed to Jorden an earnest
desire for an early and honorable
peace and "his sincere hope that
the North Vietnamese representa-'
tives in Paris would soon join
with the American delegation in
serious consideration of meaning-
ful measures to bring the fight-
ing in Vietnam to an end."
Jorden reviewed for Johnson
the Paris talks and "also described
the consistent refusal of the North
Vietnamese delegation to enter"
into serious discussions of any
proposals, except their demand
that all bombing of the North."
In a previous statement John-
son said: "I cannot order the
cessation of furtherhunilateral
acts of bombing of the infiltra-
tion routes
"We are prepared ,to halt the
bombing when we feel confident
that the halt in the bombing will
not lead to the loss of heavy
American, and allied casualties.
More than that I cannot do.

Enemy

prepares
off ensive
SAIGON '(P)-Preparing for an
offensive that may open this
month, North Vietnam has built
up its forces in South Vietnam
at five times the rate of the Unit-
ed States in the past four months,
a U.S. Command source said yes-
terday.
'As if to underscore the prepa-
rations, the senemy launched six
coordinated attacks before dawn
at South Vietnamese positions
guarding the approaches to Sai-
gon. The attacks were broken off
after about an hour. The com-
mand had no report do casualties.
Bitter fighting continid for
the second day near the Cam-
bodian border five miles north-
west of Saigon. This is one of the
buildup areas for North Vietnam-
ese forces.
The command source supported
what President Johnson told a
news conference in Washington
Wednesday, that the North Viet-
namese were making massive pre-
parations for a new offensive and
the United States might have to
take "additional military meas-
ures."

MAIL ORDERS: Send stamped self-addressed envelope
with check or money order to: Civic Center Ticket
Commission, 20 E. Jefferson, Detroit Mich.

-WALTRAUD PRODUCTION-

APOLLO
Music Center

LIBERTY
Music Shop-

AL NALLI
Music Store

Steel raise may.
hike retail c'osts,-
NEW YORK (P) - The well as the higher labor costs
spreading steel price increase is resulting from their own labor
likely to mean higher prices for settlement of last year."
products from toasters to auto- Bethlehem also estimated ,
mobiles, that the cost of a refrigerator
If the boost becomes indus- would rise about 72 cents, an
try-wide expectations are that automatic washer 80 cents, a
higher metal costs will be bathtub 44 cents and a toaster
passed on to consumers at the' or electric iron less than one
retail level, cent.
This has been the experience Appliance manufacturers spid
athreiohshee n the prcethey were studying the 'price
afte revious hikes inhe price situation but that it was too
of steel, early to tell how It would af-
Bethlehem Steel Corp., the feet them.
No. 2 producer, announced a ,5 "We iJut don't know vet"

U

ar ction. 4z modern Goozin

mom

TODAY!I

Program Information
NO 5-6290

Th mxith~e wtimilg sflt 1w~b with...

PALOMAR PICTURES
INTERNATIONAL presets
Nrw r it' s im rnm tR ,fg11 i owei

per cent general increase on
Wednesday. U.S. Steel Corp.,
the biggest steelmaker, held its
boost to tin products.
Republic Steel Corp., anoth-
er major producer, raised prices
on principal mill products. Two
smaller steelmakers, Pittsburgh
Steel and Phoenix Steel, went
along in varying degrees.
The added cost of producing
an automobile, Bethlehem said,
would be $12.
Iron Age maagzine, an au-
thoritative trade publication,
estimated the additional cost
at $16 to $20 a car.
"But more important," it
said, "is the fact that manu-
facturers frequently add on
other cost increases when steel
prices rise.
"This fall the auto industry
can be expected to add higher
costs for copper, aluminum,
rubber and other products as

%-,
said a spokesman for General
E l e c t r i e Corp. "Our guys
haven't seen any of the price
lists. Until they see prices on
what grades of steel and what
size they just can't say. We
don't raise the price every time,
a supplier of one item for an
appliance raises his price."
The price increase had minor
effect 'on stocks 'of major steel
companies traded on the New
York Stock Exchange. Bethle-
hem and U.S. Steel stocks ad-
vanced a few cents a share.
The steel price boost came on
top of a rash of price raises
covering a wide variety of prod-
ucts this week.
Admiral Corp. raised prices
of refrigerators, freezers and
electric ranges 1 to 5 per cent.
Reynolds Metals Co. hiked
prices of certain packaging ma-
terials 3% per cent. Both cited
rising labor and materials costs.

:.4 j

r mmummmmommommmi

1

I

UNDERGROUND -at the

, a

AMSN NEW TIMES: S.UN. MATINEE--1:0©4P.M. NEW PRICE: ONLYA$1.50 F..MAIE
ALWAYS THE FINEST AND MOST PROVOCATIVE PSYCHEDELIC AND EXPERIMENTAL
FILMS - PROGRAM FOR FRI., SAT., SUN. - AUGUST 2, 3, 4:
* INAUGURATION OF THE PLEASURE DOME/SACRED MUSHROOM VERSION
40 min. by Kenneth Anger. The new psychedelic version of this award-winning mystical, ex-
perimental film classic "Blow your mind on this one!"
" UP TIGHT . . . L.A. IS BORNING . . . 20 min. by Ben Van Mefer
One of the most powerful, thought-provoking Underground films produced to date. Almost
schizophrenic in its kaleidoscopic barrage of images, this film, more than any other, dynamic-
ally conveys the bewilderment, frustration, annoyance and anger of the modern generation
against the absurdities of civilization as they find it. "A MUST TO SEE"-L.A. Free Press
First Prize Ann Arbor Film Festival 1966.

CO-STARRING ABBEY BEAU NAN
LINCOLN as-iVy-. BRIDGES. MARTIN
LAURI CARROLL U

I

I

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