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July 30, 1968 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-30

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

'T'uesday, July 30, 1968

Page SIx THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, July 30, 1968

Yankeessmash

Tigers,

7

-2

By WALTER SHAPIRO
Associate Editorial Director
Another strong relief appear-
ance by Lindy McDaniel held the
league-leading Detroit Tigers at
bay last night as the NewrYork
Yankees pounded them to a 7-2
defeat behind two-run homers by
Jake Gibbs and Roy White.
NO HITTER
PHILADELPHIA MP)-Right-
hander George Culver of the
Cincinnati Reds pitched the
major leagues' third no hitter,
of the 1968 season as he beat
the Philadelphia Phillies 6-1
last night in the second game
of a twi-night doubleheader.
Even while losing the Tigers
widened their Americant League
lead to a comfortable seven, games
as the Baltimore Orioles outdid
them by dropping both ends of a
double-header to the Boston Red
-ox.
And the Cleveland Indians, also
seven games out, bowed to the
hapless Washington Senators.
Yielding only a .bases-empty
homer to Norm Cash, the veteran
McDaniel, recently acquired from
the San Francisco Giants, pre-
served the victory for the Yan-
kees' Joe Verbonic over the last'
3% innings.
McDaniel began his long career
over a decade ago when he teamed
all too briefly with his younger
brother Von to give the St. Louis
Cardinals their most exciting
brother act on the mound since
the hey-day of Dizzy and Daffy
Dean.
The ex-Cardinal in the few
weeks he has been with the tat-
tered Yankees has given them
something they have been sorely
lacking since the pennant-winning
days of Luis Arroyo - solid and
dependable relief pitching.
The Yankees broke open a 1-1
deadlock in the top of the fifth
on Joe Pepitone's two-run single.
Gibbs followed in the next inning
with his blast, the second of the
season for the Yankee catcher.
The Tigers failed to take advan-
tage of countless scoring oppor-
tunities in the early innings
agaipst the erratic Verbonic who
walked six by the time he gave
way to McDaniel in- the middle
of the sixth.
The Yankees raked. Joe Sparma
for five runs and nine hits be-
fore Tiger Manager Mayo Smith
yanked him at the end of the fifth.
The loss gave Sparma the dubious
honor of becoming the first Tiger
hurler to enter double figures in
the loss column.
One political note. The Tigers
proved they were a far more po-
tent drawing card than Minnesota
Senator Eugene McCarthy who
brought his uphill fight for the
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion to Tiger Stadium Saturday
Slightly over 15,000 turned out,
for McCarthy's campaign tally. A
paid crowd of 31,231 witnessed
last night's Tiger defeajt.I

*

*

*'

Locate backers for
Montreal franchise

WARREN GILES

da*ly
NIGHT EDITOR:
DAVID WEIR
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE1-
Wi L Pct. GB
Detroit 63 39 .618 -
Baltimore 55 45 .550 7
Cleveland 57 47 .548 7
Boston 53 46 .535 81,4
xOakland 50 50 .500 12
xMmnnesota 48 52 .480 14
Netil York 47 51 .480)14
xCalifornia 17 53 .470 15
xChicago 43 54 .443 1-,.
Washington 36 62 .36 25
xLate game not included.
Yesterday's Results
Boston 3-8, Baltimore 2-3, Day-Night
(Day Game 10 innings) .
"ashington 4, Cleveland 2,nigit
New York 7, Detroit 2, night
Chicago at Oakland, night
Minnesota at California, night
Today's Games
New York at Detroit, night
Chicago at Oakland
Washington at Cleveland, night
Baltimore at Boston
Only games scheduled.

By The Associated Press
MONTREAL - Charles Bronf-
man says he has found the money
needed to replace the investment
withdrawn by two backers last
week and Montreal's future in
baseball's National League now
rests solely in suitable stadium
facilities.
Bronfman, one of the original
backers of Montreal's professional
baseball franchise, said that
while a new French-speaking
partner has yet to be located,
"We have the necessary money."
Last week, financier J. Louis
Levesque and funeral director
Marc Bourgie withdrew as back-
ers of the Montreal team.
Bronfman said that names
would not be immediately an-
nounced and could be revealed on-
ly if the City of Montreal offered
the club the necessary facilities
at the Autostade, home of the
Montreal Alouettes of the Eastern
Football Conference.
Wayren Giles, president of the
National League, said in New York
that he wasn't concerned that
Montreal wouldn't be able to go
through with its commitment.
Giles said that he was in close
touch with the Montreal situation
and was prepared to go to the
Canadian city in case of a crisis,
which he did not expect.
"We anticipated last week's
withdrawals," the National League
president said, "We had 10 back-
ers of the franchise originally.
For every one that drops out, an-
other member seems ready to take
up the slack."
Bronfman said he has been
Braun predicts
Olympic Split
JOHANNESBURG, South Afri-
ca UP) - African proposals to re-
place the International Olympic
SCommittee will lead to the break
up of the Olympic movement,
Frank: Braun, South African
Olympic and National Games As-
sociation president, said yester-
day.
"The United States and Britain
are not going to be dictated to
by little countries. In the end, the
movement will be split and will,
break up." said Braun.
He was commenting on reports
that Kenya, Uganda, Sudan,
Egypt and Ethiopia were pressing
for a new Olympic body repre-
senting all countries with Olym-
pic committees. The present IOC
is the selecting body whose mem-
bers serve for life.

working hard to keep the fran-
chise.y
Apparently he has succeeded by
finding the necessary funds, al-
though he still is looking for a
French-speaking associate and
feels hopeful the right man has
been located and may enter the
picture shortly.
With the new cash, the pot is
said to have swelled to the nec-
essary $10,000,000 to cover ex-
pense of the franchise, players
and initial operating costs. The
first payment-1,200,000-is due
Thursday and most of the balance
in January, 1969.
Concerning the stadium facili-
ties, some authorities have sug-
gested a roof could be built to
guarantee fair weather baseball
for b e t w e e n $3,000,000 and
$5,000,000.'
The expected addition of Mon-
treal to the National League rost-
er expands major league baseball
to Canada for the first time.
Canadien teams have long com-
peted on the minorrleague level,
but until this year have not
reached the big time.

McLain sets sights
on turttwneason.
By The Associated Press
DETROIT - If all goes well, Denny McLain will start about 16
more games this season. That gives him 16 chances to become the
first 30 game winner in the major leagues since Dizzy Dean posted
a 30-7 record with the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League in
1934,
McLain is expected to shoot for his 21st victory of the season o-
morrow when he likely will start against Washington at Tiger
Stadium.
He missed becoming the earliest 20-game winner in majdr league
history Saturday by only nine days as he pitched the American
League-leading Tigers to a 9-0, three-hit shutout over second-place
Baltimore.
Back in 1912, the year the Titanic sunk, Rube Marquand of the
old New York Giants sank opposing teams with 19 straight victories
at the start of the, year and went on to post his 20tlh= on July 19.
McLain's 20th came July 27.
The talented, 24year-old right-hander ;has lost only three games
so' far this year, while posting a remarkable 2.10 earned run average
in 210 innings.
He has now beaten every team in the league at least once for
the fourth straight year he has accomplished the feat. No other
pitcher in the league has beaten every opponent during that period.
The year Dean won his 30 garhes he didn't collect his 20th until
Aug. 7. Lefty Grove had'a 31-4 record with the Philadelphia Ath-
letics in 1931 to become the latest American Leaguer to post 90
victories. His 20th triumph came July 25.
Last year McLain,, although he chalked up a 17-16 :record,
struggled along most of the season and finished with a '3.79 earned-
run average.
He dislocated a tpe last. September when Detroit was in its
stretch drive to capture the pennant. McLain started only five games
that month and failed to win any of them as the Tigers lost the
pennant on the last day of the season when they bowed to California,
enabling the Boston Red Sox to capture first place alone.
IU

f1

Associated Press

Dennis McLain

FORMER ASSISTANT:
1'MLean replaces Hunt ashead'M trainer
Lindsy McLean, 30, former here under Hunt. Len Paddock tricity, etc.; also, the branch of
trainer at San Jose State College, and Ed Dirks will remain on the medicine concerned with such
was named head athletic trainer Michigan staff as assistant train- treatment.
yesterday, replacing the retired ers. The trainer is recognized by
Jim Hunt.,; McLean started his training as modern sports scholars as having
"McLean, who was released re- student assistant to Joe Worden an integral role in the successes
cently from a contract with the at Vanderbilt University, leaving and failures of the team he serves.
San Francisco 49ers in order to there with a degree in psychology. He acts both as a cymbal and a
accept the Michigan post, had He earned a physical therapist symbol, that is, he can both cheer
served two years as an assistant certicate at Herman Hospital in a team on to victory like the
Houston, Texas. crashing percussion section of a
McLean worked as an -assistant brass band and he can simultan-
athletic trainer at Michigan in eously repair the injured limbs
1961-62, then took the head train- of his athletes, thereby being a
ing job at the University of Cali- personification of strength.
fornia at Santa Barbara for two Those who know JimH and
years before moving to San Jose Kenny Mcoean are certan
State.eKenny Mceaneceraint
Presntl Chirma oftheeach will do a regular bang-up
Norher C 1 fo rn ia Ahleicjob in his respective position. I
Trainers Association, McLean has
been active with the National uC 1k
Athletic Trainers Association. WE Ltl.. VME
Hunt, who had been Michigan's{
top trainer for 21 years, plans to TUDENTS!
enter private practice in physical * DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
therapy here in Ann Arbor. HAIRSTYLING for Men-
Webster defines physical ther- And Women-
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NATIONAL LEAGUE
WiL

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Tooth Paste

5-DAY SPRAY
DEODORANT

St. Louis 1 68 36 .651 -
Atianita 54 49 .524 31
Cincinnati 51 47 .520 1-
San Francisco 5? 50 .510 15
Chicago 52? 52 .5011 16
Philadelphia 48 53 .475 17
Pittsburgh 48 53 .475 17
New York 49 56 .467 191
Houstonl 45 58 .137 ?21
,0s Angeles 45 58 .137?21
Yesterday's Results
San Francisco 4. Chicago I
Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 2, night
Houston, Los Angeles 0, night
St. Louis 5, New York 1, night
Cincinnati 7-6. Philadelphia 6-I,
twi-night
Today's Game,
St. Louis at New York, night
San Francisco at Chicago
Atlanta at Pittsburgth, 2, twi-night.
Los Angeles at Houston, night
,Cincinnati at Philadelphia, night

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LINDSY McLEAN

The knee
By The Associated Press He also
The All-America tackle was turf whe
carried to the sidelines with a cleats are
knee injury and the team's hopes knee inju
for a conference championship ' Dr. Car
left with him. sity of No
The squad's leading ground- is no que
gainer hopped to the bench, his has redu
arms around the shoulders of two added, "T
teanmates and one leg dangling whether i
useless. shorter cl
These are familiar stories and the two."
sights during any football season Blyth i
anda problem that keeps coaches,
and trainers in a never-ending
search for methods of preventing
the frequent knee injury.
Recent studies listed damage to
the knee as the most common dis-
abling injury in football.h
They show twice as many knee
injuries suffered by defensive
players than by those on offense,
with guards and tackles the most
frequent victims.,
NO CONTACT
Game movies showed, the sur-
vey continued, that there was no
contact involved in fully one-
fourth of the injuries. A player ,
was hurt without even being hit
when he attempted to pivot with
a foot planted solidly on the
ground'and his cleats dug deeply,
into the' turf.
Now, physicians say, many knee
injuries could be eliminated by
the use of synthetic turf, a new
type of football shoe with revolv-j
ing cleats, and proper condition-
ing.
Dr. Ed Martinet, chief of physi-
cal medicine and rehabilitation at
Bowman-Gray Hospital at Wake
Forest University in Winston-
Salem, N.C., said the use of swivel
bleats could cut down sharply on
the incidences of knee injuries.
CUT ANGLE FORCEy
Martinet, former team doctor
for the U.S. Naval Academy squad,
said the swivel cleats prevent the
fnntd 'frn.j'whtArgo larted solidlyv in

FORESEE CURE:
injury: A

case study

said the new synthetic'
re shoes with shorter
e used can cut down on
ries.
rI S. Blyth of the Univer-
orth Carolina said there
stion that synthetic turf
ced knee injuries but
There is a question as to
t is just the turf, or the

education, director of the univer- an effort to cut down on the knee
sity's laboratory of applied psy- injuries.l
chology and president-elect of the Developed by Dr. Bruce Cam-
eron of Houston, Tex., the cleats
American College of Sports Medi- under the front part of the foot

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He suggested that an in-depth
study be made on the modification
of football cleats and on the syn-
thetic turf.

eats, or a combination of At Duke University, all fresh-
man football players this year will
s a professor of physical , be wearing a new type of shoe in"

are mounted on a swivel disc that
rotates 360 degrees.
ALLOW SPIN
The revolving cleats enable a
player to spin around rapidly dur-
ing play, promoting agility and
mobility and also reducing strain
and tension on the knees and
ankles.
Physical conditioning, said Dr.
J. Leonard Goldner, chief of or-
thopaedic surgery at Duke Uni-
versity Medical Center, can play
an equally important part in re-'
ducing knee injuries.
Goldner said specific condition-
ing must focus on the thigh and
calf muscles.
But he is strongly opposed to
the deep-knee bends and duck}
walking exercises used by many
college coaches.
These, he said, put undue stress
on the meniscus, the crescent-'
shaped cartilage within the knee
joint that's the object of so many
athletic injuries to the knee.
TURF HELPS
Dr. James R. Whitehurst, med-
ical director of the University of
Houston health center, said there
has been a "remarkable lower-
ing" in the number of knee and
ankle injuries suffered by athletes
playing on the synthetic turf at
Houston's Astrodome.
In a report to the American
College Health Association meet-
ing in Minneapolis, Whitehurst
said the drop in lower extremity
injuries was due mainly to the use
of the soccer-type shoe.
The shoe, with a short cleat,
does not penetrate the man-made
grass.
He said that in 13 games played
by the University of Houston in
f.. Ita A.., 4. cf^Ama i i, :-.A l1487

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FORUM ON,
REVOLUTION
with
TOM and MARGE MELVILLE
Tom Melville and his wife Marge are a priest and a
nin who had been sent to Guatemala byth e Mary-
knoll order for the express purpose of helping the
people. When it was exposed thatthey were sup-
portinig local guerilla movements in their struggle
against oppression, they were forced to leave the
country,. and were subsequently expelled from the
church.
Most recently, they were involved with the Can-

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