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May 04, 1968 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-04

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday,

May 4, 1968

PageSbc THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Satuday Ma 4.196

CLASSIC TODAY
Forward Pass heads 3-year-olds in Kentucky Derby

Celtics scuttle Lakers for
ninth NBA title in ten years

LOUISVILLE (AP)-Fourteen of
America's finest 3-year-old colts,
with Calumet Farms' Forward
Pass as the probable favorite, are
set to start in today's 94th run-
ning of the Kentucky Derby.
The Churchill Downs handi-
capper figured Forward Pass, win-
ner of the Florida Derby and Blue
Grass Stakes, would be 8-5 by the
4:38 p.m. 'start of the 14-mile
classic.
Meanwhile, trainer Lou Cava-
laris and his veterinarian, Dr. Alex
Harthill, pronounced Dancer's
Image fit after an early morning
blowout of three-eighths of a
mile in 37 seconds.

Dancer's Image is plagued with
ankle trouble, but Cavalaris said
tie son of Native Dancer returned
from the work in good shape.
The colt stands in a bucket of
ice water two hours a day. i
Dancer's Image will start from
dal
spor s

the No. 12 slot while Forward
Pass comes out of No. 13. a spot
that may cut into his odds.
Only C. Y. Whitney's Gleam-
ing Sword, a 30-1 choice, starts
from a position outside of Forward
Pass.
Race experts say that the fa-
vorite will have to run two lengths
more than Iron Ruler, from the
October House Farm, who is
slated to go from the No. 1 berth.
Other starters in order from No.
2 through No. 11, are T.V. Com-
mercial, Jig Time, Kentucky
Sherry, Trouble Brewing, Te Vega,
Don B., Verbatim, Captain's Gig,
Francie's Hat and Proper Proof,
whip
~ ~ - -

With more than 12 betting in-
terests, Kentucky Sherry, Trouble
Brewing and Te Vega were lump-
ed together as the field entry.
The weatherman said there was
a 10 per cent chance for showers,
although there would be clouds.
The track is expected to be fast.
With the 94th Derby's post
time only hours away, the talk on
the Churchill' Downs backstretch
centered around the favorite, Ca-
lumet Farms' Forward Pass.
"I'm sure glad this isn't a
match race," said Lou Cavalaris,
trainer of Dancer's Image. "If it
was, there wouldn't be a way in
the world to beat him.

"If that big brute was against
you in a match race and had his
own way, I don't think there's a
horse around that could beat
him."
Peter Fuller, owner of probable
second choice Dancer's Image,
was a bundle of jagged nerves as
he searched for signs of victory
in the $125,000-added classic that
will be the second richest Derby
ever if all 14 start.
"A horse I named for my
daughter Abigil won Thursday at
Suffolk. Boy, I sure hope that's
the start of a winning weekend,"
the tanned Boston sportsman said.

LOS ANGELES A', - Boston's
Celtics blitzed the Los Angeles
Lakers 124-109 Thursday nightj
to win back the championship of
the National Basketball Associa-
tion.
Paced by John Havlicek with
40 points, the Eastern kingpins
built a 20-point halftime advan-
tage and clung to a big lead
through the final two quarters be-
fore 17,298 at the Forum.
The convincing victory gave the
Celtics a 4-2 triumph in their
best-of-7 final playoff series.
Taking advantage of cold shoot-
ing by the Lakers, Boston built a
35-28 lead by the end of the first
quarter and had whipped it to a
20-point advantage before the
second stanza was half over.
Elgin Baylor, who led the Lakers
with 28, missed a free throw with
Los Angeles trailing by seven.
He retrieved the ball but incred-
ibly failed on a stuff shot. I
When Havlicek was fouled in
the back court, the Celtic star
dropped in a pair of free throws.
That started Boston enroute to a
surge during which the Celtics
garnered 15 points with Jerry

West's two-pointer the only Laker
score.
Sam Jones hit four from the
floor during the quick surge.
Los Angeles fought back in the
third quarter and cut the lead to
84-73 before the Celtics drew away
for their ninth championship in
the past 10 seasons. Only last year,
when the Philadelphia 76ers de-
throned them, have the Celtics
been without the title.
Bailey Howell tallied 30 for the
champions and Larry Siegfried 22.
Strangely, in the 35-point first
quarter, Havlicek, Howell and
Siegfried were Boston's only scor-
ers. By halftime, Player-Coach
Bill Russell. Don Nelson and Sam
Jones had joined the growing list.
Boston never trailed in this
series as they won the first game
107-101, lost the second 123-113,
won 127-119, lost 118-105 and
Tuesday night edged the Lakers
120-117 in overtime in Boston.
Russell scored 12 points for
Shis club but also grabbed 19 re-
bounds. The Lakers' Mel Counts
had a career high rebounding ef-
fort with 25.

Wolverines

osU-

In

twin

BILL RUSSELL
bill

By ROBIN WRIGHT
Michigan's red-hot baseball
team put together steady pitching
and power hitting yesterday as
they took both ends of a double-
header from Ohio State, 6-3 and
8-3.
The twin victories stretched the
Wolverines' winning streak to
'eght games, and left them alone
atop the Bg Ten scramble with a
4-0 mark in conference play.;
Michigan started fast, getting a
run in the first inning of the first
game when captain Doug Nelson
singled home Andy Fister, who
had walked and stolen second,
The Buckeyes, picked by many
to take the conference crown this
year (as, they have the past three
seasons), recovered with two runs
in the third.
But in the bottom of the third,!
Wolverine left-fielder Elliott Mad-
dox blasted his second home run
of the spring with one away before
Nelson and third-baseman Glen
Redmon stroked singles, and Jim
Hosler singled both home to give
Michigan a 4-2 lead.
Maddox clouted a double in the
fourth to scoi'e Fisher from sec-
ond.
RELIEF?
Keith Stilwell came in to re-
place Buckeye starter Dick Boggs
in the sixth, but the reliever wild-
pitched home the final Wolverine
run. Ohio State rallied briefly in
the seventh inning, but the one
run they managed to score was
not enough to have the game.
Dave Renkiewicz went all the
way for Michigan, giving up eight
scattered hits as he raised his
overall record to 3-4 (2-0 in the
Big Ten).
Rod Scott started the second
contest, and was also staked to
an early lead by his teammates.'
Michigan got a single run in
the first when Redmon nailed a
single to xcenter and eventually
scored on a passed ball.
Ohio State again regained the
lead with two runs, this time in
the second.
But Buckeye hurler Ken Ervin
gave up a single to Bud Forsythe
and Pete Titoine and walked Scott
and Maddox for another Michigan
tally. Redman followed with a
Graebner and
Ashe get Davis
Cup zone 'wins
RICHMOND, Va. P) - The
United States Davis Cup team!
swept to a 2-0 lead over the Brit-
ish Caribbean in opening Ameri-
can Zone competition yesterday on
the wings of runaway victories by
Arthur Ashe and Clarke Graebner.
Ashe, a 24-year-old Army lieu-
tenant and native Richmonder,
showed off before the homefolks
by demolishing Lance Lumsden
6-1, 6-1, 6-0 in the second singles
match, which. lasted only 49
minutes.
Graebner, 24, had set the tempo
in the opening singles, experi-
encing moments of anxiety only in
the second set while defeating the
visitors' top player, Richard Rus-
sell, 6-1, 7-5, 6-2.

*

*

*

*

St. Louis Hawk franchise sold to Atlanta

ST. LOUIS (MP-The St. Louis
Hawks of the National Basketball
Association have been sold to an
Atlanta group, owner Bob Ker-
ner announced yesterday. The
franchise will be moved to At-
lanta.
The group buying the Hawks
is headed by Carl E. Sanders,
former governor of Georgia, and
includes Thomas G. Cousins, an
Atlanta real estate developer. At-
torney Jack Ashmore, a law part-
ner of Sanders, represented the
group in the negotiations.
Kerner said the sale is subject
to approval of the NBA's BoardI
of Governors. The Board meets
Tuesday in New York and ap-
proval is expected. '
Kerner, long time owner of the
Hawks, was quoted as saying
"They just don't want our pro-
duct here anymore."!
The story of the sale was first
Major Leagi

made public in this morning's
editions of the St. Louis Globe-
Democrat.
No sale price was announced.
"It was more than the price of
an expansion team, but not much
more," Kerner said. "We had to
do it. There was no way we could
continue in St. Louis. We had tried
to find a St. Louis group inter-
ested, but we didn't find any. This
deal came up unexpectedly."
Kerner said that he and his
attorney, Mike Aubuchon,, talked
last weekend in Los Angeles with
Walter Kennedy, commissioner of
the NBA. Last Tuesday, Ashmore
and a group of accountants came
to St. Louis and met with officials
of the Hawks.
With Sanders in the team will
be Thomas G. Cousins, an Atlanta
real estate broker.
"We have been expanding sports
in Atlanta," Ashmore said. "In

DOUG NELSON

the last few years we have added Throughout the season, the
professional baseball, football and Hawks competed with the St.
soccer." Louis Blues, the city's new entry
In the 1967-68 season, the in the National Hockey League.
Hawks won their division title Kerner would not blame the Blues
under Coach Richie Guerin for for wrecking the club.
the first time in eight years, but Kerner said he would remain
the club was upset in the playoffs in St. Louis. Marty Blake, general
by San Francisco. Less than 9,000 manager of the club, has been
fans turned out for three playoff invited to run the team in Atlanta,
games in St. Louis. but has not reached a decision.
DOES YOUR
STUDENT, DEFERMENT
EXPIRE'IN JUNE?
THE NEW DRAFT LAW
contains 150 pp. of Legal Information:
-TEXT OF NEW LAW AND NEW S.S.S. REGS
-DEFERMENTS AND HOW TO SEEK THEM
-ARMY PHYSICAL STANDARDS
-SUGGESTIONS FOR REGISTRANTS, PARENTS
Send $5, plus 80c first class postage

slow grounder to short, and Scott
scored as Maddox was forced out
at second.
Ohio State got its final run of
the day in the third. Second-base-
man Bruce Heine was robbed of a
sure hit by Maddox before Bill
Long singled and stole second.
Long scored when first-baseman
Dave Heiss singled to center, where
Fisher bobbled the ball.
In other Big Ten action yester-
day, Michigan State defated In-
diana twice to square its confer-
ence markat 2-2. Michigan faces
the' Hoosiers in another twin bill
tomorrow at 1:00 p.m.
Billboard'
The Michigan Tae Kwon Do'
Association will present a dem-
onstration of Korean karate at
9 p.m. today in the McKiney
Union at Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity. Information on the
club's summer schedule will be
available from members at the
demonstration.

"A large part of the troubled American con-
science of the Sixties is laid bare ... The reading
of this book is an intellectual pleasure, a mental
delight."-THOMAS LASK, New York Times
"Only a few books say anything of enduring sig-
nificance about war and the moral response to it.
This is such a book. By interviewing a wide range
of dissenters .. . and relating their opinions by
judicious commentary of his own, Mr. Finn has
produced a classic on contemporary politics."
-WILLIAM V. SHANNON of The New York Times
N
PACIFISM & POLITICS
Some Passionate Views
on War & Nonviolence
By JAMES FINN
$2.45, paperbound, now at your bookstore
A VINTAGE BOOK
Published by
ALFRED." A* KNOPF and RANDOM HOUSE

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Baltimore 13 6 .684
Detroit 13 7 .650
Minnesota 12 8 .600
Washington 11 9 .550
California 10 11 .476
Boston 9 10 .474
New York 9 11 .450
Oakland 9 11 .450
Cleveland 8 11 .421
Chicago 3 13 .188
Yesterday's Results
C*veland 4, Minnesota 0
Oakland 7, Boston 2
California 6, Detroit 5
Baltimore 6, Washington 1
New York 3, Chicago 2
Today's Gaines
Oakland at Boston
New York at Chicago
California at Detroit
Minnesota at Cleveland
Baltimore at Washington

GB
21>
4
4
4
47
5
8?

ie Sta nd i n ts,
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct"
xSt. Louis 14 6 .700
xCincinnati 10 9 .526
xSan Francisco 10 9 .526
xLos Angeles 10 10 .500
Philadelphia 10 10 .500
Pittsburgh 9 10 .474
Chicago 9 11 .450
Houston 9 11 .450
Atlanta 9 12 .429

A

GB
3-
3 1/
4
4
41y
5
5
5%

to: DRAFT MANUAL
Box 673
Berkeley, Calif.
94701

An informational
service by the
National Lawyers
Guild (nonprofit)

x late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2
Houston 5, Atlanta 3
Chicago atNew York, postponed rain
St. Louis at San Francisco, night
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
Today's Games
Chicago at New York
St. Louis at San Francisco
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
Atlanta at Houston
Cincinnati at Los Angeles

WORSHIP

I

Guitar Herb
Studio DaVid
INSTRUMENTS MADE,
SOLD and REPAIRED
Accessories-Lessons-Rentals
209 S. State, Ann Arbor
665-8001

.4

LEARN THE THRILL OF SAILING
Let the CORINTHIAN SCHOOL OF SAILING show
you how easy it is to learn the exhilaration and excite-
ment of mastering wind and waves.
Enroll now (by yourself or with some friends) in
courses adjusted to your individual needs.
The Corinthian School of Sailing
Phone 761-1208 eves.

E4

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William-on the Campus
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Family Service-8:15 a.m.
Regular Service-9:15 and 11:00 a.m:
Theme: "Get On With the Job."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Percival Lerseth, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
7:00 p.m.-Discussion.
HURON FILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-Coffee.
9:45 a.m.-U Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11 :00 a.m.-"Positive Life Through an Old
Legacy."
7:00. p.m. - Panel and Discussion: "My
Thoughts as a Christian on Death, Funeral
and Burial."
8:30 p.m.-College and Careers Fellowship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenow
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
'dfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Service, Sermon, "Com-
plementing Christ's Promises."
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Study of Gospel ac-
cording to St. John.
Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.-Steak fry, Phone 663-
5560 for reservations.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m., and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
ALDERSGATE STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP and THE ANN ARBOR
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
1700 Newport Road

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m:-Bible Study.

jl

Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services--Coll

David E. Jefford, Pastor
945 a.m.-Discussion.
7:00 p.m.-Vespers.
For transportation call 663-2869.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 o.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "A New Church for a New Day."
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt, Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"Crucible of Communication,"
Dr. Calvin Malefyt.
7:00 p.m. - "Prayers of Life," Rev. Paul
Swetz.

4

IT LOOKS LIKE
A KELLY GIRL
SUMMER !
(Why not when you can work
for the notion's leading tem-
porary service?)
HOWEVER or WHENEVER you
want to make money this sum-
mer, join the thousands of col-
lege students, teachers, and
office personnel and adminis-
trators who -make KELLY their
one stop for earnings that often
exceed expectations!
Office skills? KELLY needs them
all . . . secretarial, steno-
graphic, typing (manual or
electric), transcribing machine
operators, bookkeeping, recep-
tionists (light typing), others.
Temporary administrative posi-
tions, too.
WHY NOT SECURE YOUR
POSITION NOW AS A
SUMMER KELLY GIRL?
rrnp i- n + thenmar't ell

9:45 a.m:-Sunday School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.

j

ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway

9:00 a.m.-Morning Prover and
munion.

Holy Com-

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt,
W. C. Wright

Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.-1st in series of
WCC studies on "All Things New."

7

h Two
great ways
to get around
c an cmrii~q

Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:0 a m -Worshin Service S.unc1v School

11:00 a.m.-Coffee in the lounge.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 o.m.-Morning Worship Service. Ser-
mon: "Faith and the Church."
7:00 p.m.-vening Worship Service. Ser-
mon: "Unity in Christ."

Armin C. Bizar,

9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m -Church School.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
1 1:00 a.m.-Easter Service outside on May-
nard St. (weather permitting)
Sermon: "A Fool's Easter", Music and

I.

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